Sam Westwood's Hollywood

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by markedward, Sep 22, 2018.

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  1. Threadmarks: Beginnings

    markedward Well-Known Member

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    Sam Westwood's Hollywood
    A Timeline by markedward

    (Based on my prior timeline It Girls, Boys Next Door, Scream Queens, and Dorothy)


    From the documentary film Sam Westwood's Hollywood (2016)
    Disclaimer

    From the time he made his screen debut in the mid-1960's until 1983, there was an actor who seemed to be everywhere. After he was outed as gay, his career went down in flames. During the 1990's, his work was re-evaluated and a comeback ensued. His name? Sam Westwood. This is his story.

    The screen fades to archival footage of a rather good-looking boy next door type. A dark-haired cross between Tab Hunter and Kent McCord only with more of an edge. There is a chronological montage of clips from several of Sam's movies from his peak: Mary Rose (1967), Eye Of The Cat (1969), Never Give An Inch (1970), The Grifters (1970), The Kill-Off (1971), Traffic Jam (1972), The Reincarnation Of Peter Proud (1976), Interlocked (1978), and The Front Runner (1982).

    Cut to the same man. He is in his early 70's now but looks considerably younger. Sam is filmed in his second home, a small beachfront property located on Vancouver Island, Canada.


    Sam: My whole career was an accident (laughs)

    Interviewer: Can you tell us about your early life?

    Sam: Well, I was born in Reno, Nevada on February 8th, 1945. When I was about a year old, my father got a job offer in Tucson, Arizona and we moved there.

    My father, Fred, was a World War II Veteran who worked as a file clerk. My mother, Sylvia, stayed at home until I was old enough to attend school. Later on, she went to work part-time at a travel agency.

    My parents wanted more kids but were unable to. My mom had several miscarriages and it was, you know, rough on both of them. As a result, they poured a lot of affection onto me, which became...smothering at times.

    But you know, they were both very kind, intelligent people and both of them supported my hobbies.

    The interviewer is heard talking in the background

    Sam: I was seen as the good upstanding boy next door who would take a girl out to the school dance and have her home by curfew. It slowly dawned on me as a teenager that I was more interested in dating the football team.

    Sam chuckles before looking serious

    In the dark ages...nobody talked about it.

    Interviewer: Did you feel a need to get out of Arizona?

    Sam: I took journalism for about a semester and then dropped out because I realized writing stories or maybe film scripts interested me more than working at a paper. I saved a little money doing odd jobs and came out to California at the start of 1964 just for the change of scenery.

    My parents gave me a year to figure out what I wanted to do. If I didn't have things together by the new year I had to go back to school. My plan was to maybe take English and be a teacher and, you know, write on the side.

    As everyone knows-- (laughs)

    Interviewer: Things turned out differently

    Sam: Yeah. (nods)

    After a few months of odd jobs, I found work doing maintenance at Disneyland and relocated to Anaheim. Someone who worked higher up for the studio visited the park one day and spotted me.

    A few days later. Someone else was sent to the park to find me and I was asked to report to the studio in Burbank the next morning.

    Interviewer: So it wasn't Disney himself?

    Sam: No. What happened was the publicity department changed the story to Walt Disney spotting me at the park during a routine meet and greet. It was actually someone who worked for the studio in production.

    My first time visiting a studio was intense. I waited. And waited. Finally, a secretary led me into an office. Disney was at a desk. There was this older British fellow with him, who turned out to be Robert Stevenson.

    It was incredibly nervewracking. They both introduced themselves. When Robert Stevenson introduced himself as a director, it was one of those "a-ha!" moments. I tried to act like I knew his work (laughs).

    Interviewer: You hadn't seen 'Mary Poppins'?

    Sam: Hey. I wasn't picky, but their movies weren't really on my radar.

    I was asked if I would like to do a screen test for a role in one of two films the studio was about to shoot. It was one of those Lana Turner stories you hear where you go "Yeah right. Sure that happened!" (Sam comically rolls his eyes)

    Well, it happened to me.

    **********************************************************************************

    From Biography: Sam Westwood (2001)

    Narrator: Unbeknownst to Sam, one of the Disney's top stars, Tommy Kirk, was losing favor with the studio.

    Sam: I was kept in the dark as to why Tommy was on his way out. They weren't sure if Dean Jones was going to continue making films either.

    All I knew at the time was that Robert Stevenson was directing two movies. I tested for 'The Monkey's Uncle' with Annette, which I didn't get. Then I tested for 'That Darn Cat!' with Hayley Mills. I was to play a character named Canoe Henderson.

    Narrator: Tommy Kirk returned to Disney long enough to shoot The Monkey's Uncle, but it would be his last film for the studio before a sharp career decline.

    Cut to footage of HAYLEY MILLS shot for the documentary

    Mills: Sam was just a kid. He seemed very private at first, but polite. He asked a lot of questions about acting.

    Sam: I asked anyone who happened to be on set for pointers. Haley, Roddy McDowell, Dean Jones...

    Narrator: Right away, Sam knew the studio had a screen image set in stone.

    Sam: To them, I was the stereotypical polite, upstanding boy next door. It was...stifling.

    Mills: Sam was a natural

    Cut to Sam

    I was nervous! (laughs)
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2018
  2. Threadmarks: Production on Eye Of The Devil (1966) and Sam's early work

    markedward Well-Known Member

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    September 1965

    From an issue of Variety

    “Sources say Kim Novak narrowly escaped a horse riding injury on the set of the J. Lee Thompson directed film Eye Of The Devil...” [1]

    From a December 1965 issue of Variety

    “Filming has been completed on Eye Of The Devil. The J. Lee Thompson directed film stars Kim Novak, David Niven, David Hemmings, and newcomer Sharon Tate. The John Calley and Martin Ranshoff production is set for a July 1966 release.”

    From Sam Westwood's Hollywood

    Sam: I really don't know if they knew what to do with me. I was too young for the Dick Van Dyke, Dean Jones-type roles and too old for the stuff Kurt Russell did later on. They considered me for the lead in The Ugly Dachshund because, at the time, Dean Jones was thinking about quitting films to become a pastor. They had me on standby in case.

    The interviewer is heard mentioning that Sam still appeared in said film.

    Sam: Yeah, a part was written in just for me as the kid brother who dog sat. I was playing surfers and kid brothers. I picked up surfing in California, so it wasn't a stretch.

    I'd get scripts for things, screen tests. There were a couple of offers for loan outs, but that was limited because they had to be approved. It was a very conservative environment in those days. Ten years later, Jodie Foster was allowed to appear in 'Taxi Driver'. That never would have happened back in '66.

    They were paying me a salary, but I took a part-time job waiting tables at a Japanese restaurant because I needed to be busy. I started learning Japanese which came in handy later.

    Interviewer: When you shot films in Japan--

    Sam nods

    Sam: Anyway, I really wanted to do this movie called 'Lord Love A Duck' with Tuesday Weld and Ruth Gordon. Roddy McDowell was approached and he mentioned me to them. The film was a spoof of beach movies and I liked the dark humor. But it had some subject matter which Disney objected to. To be fair, some of it was questionable in hindsight. Roddy wound up doing it anyway. He was in his late 30's, I think, playing a teenager.

    It was through Roddy that I met Sal Mineo. Sal was kind of...on his way out. To me, he was still a movie star. I respected what work of his I'd seen.

    The off-camera interviewer is heard asking about rumors regarding Sam and Sal Mineo

    Sal was interested, yes. But I secretly had a boyfriend at the time and wasn't interested in sharing.

    Anyway, regarding the previous topic, I finally got loaned out to do 'Fireball 500' over at AIP with Fabian, Frankie Avalon, and Annette. I played this kid named Joey who died in a racing accident.

    At Disney, I'd hear things like "We want you to play the prince in a live-action 'Sleeping Beauty' for television" or we have a script for you with Dean Jones or Dick Van Dyke". Nothing ever panned out. I tested for 'The Happiest Millionaire'. I can't sing to save my life. John Davidson also tested and he got the part. Honestly, John was a better fit. He could at least sing (laughs). And he enjoyed working there.

    I was let go a few months before Disney passed away and was about to move back home. Dick Clayton approached me about being a client of his. Dick helped me land a part in a movie over at Warner Brothers which I shot later in the year. I'd go between New York City to film 'Don't Sleep In The Subway' and Los Angeles for various screentests--

    [1] IOTL, this accident led to Deborah Kerr replacing Novak.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2018
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  3. Unknown Member

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    You forgot the footnote in your first update.

    Good TL...
     
  4. markedward Well-Known Member

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    Thank You!

    Footnote? (If you can explain that would be awesome, thanks!)
     
  5. Unknown Member

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    That, @markedward...
     
  6. unclepatrick Well-Known Member

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    Glad to see this is back. I like the fact that it not Disney who really discovers Sam but that the press reports say it is.

    Nice to see Robert Stevenson appear. I always like him as a Director. He did my favorite version of King Solomon Mines, the 1937 version that was the best adaption of the novel.
    He also did seven episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents. You might consider him as a Director in a film in your timeline, if you can get him away from Disney.
     
  7. markedward Well-Known Member

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    Thought it would make more sense to have it be someone who actually just worked there and the studio twisting it around later for publicity.

    Thanks! Glad you're enjoying it!
     
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  8. claybaskit Gone Fishin'

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    Can you use more roddy McDowall in this? He is my favorite actor.i never heard this person your writing about.maybe he could guest star in gidget.adam 12.also.
     
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  9. markedward Well-Known Member

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    Fixed. Thank you for letting me know. I think I was on hiatus too long! :openedeyewink:
     
  10. markedward Well-Known Member

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    Roddy pops up here and there. This is a reboot of a previous piece I worked on for a couple years. Sam Westwood (and Harris Walker, possibly the most lovable train crash ever) are actors I concocted to move a story about 1970's Hollywood along. They grew on me over the last few years and it's mostly seen through their eyes. There are real and fictional characters. Sharon Tate, Natalie Wood, and Jeffrey Hunter all play a large role. I occasionally use links as some of the OTL celebs mentioned are people who are largely forgotten today. That's why there was a Wiki link to Dick Clayton.

    If you see the names Art Ericson or Edward O'Malley, that is an indication I came up with an OTL film plot.

    Sam doesn't do Adam-12 but Kent McCord (Sam's doppelganger) is going to pop up quite a bit. Martin Milner to a lesser extent.
     
  11. Threadmarks: Don't Sleep In The Subway (1967)

    markedward Well-Known Member

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    From Sam Westwood's Hollywood

    Rare home movie footage from the set of Don't Sleep In The Subway (1967) is shown while Sam talks

    Sam: Dick had me go see Jeff Corey, who was a respected acting teacher. To this day I credit him with helping me to become more comfortable around the camera. 'Don't Sleep In The Subway' wasn't the greatest movie ever made, but it was the first thing I genuinely enjoyed working on. Of course, I worked with Jeffrey Hunter quite a bit during the 1970's--

    Don't Sleep In The Subway (Warner Brothers/7 Arts May 1967)

    Synopsis

    Fluffy romantic comedy from novice screenwriter Edward O'Malley about Broadway actress/pop star Lily Harper (Petula Clark), and her difficult Brill Building composer husband, Michael (Jeffrey Hunter).

    Lily becomes jealous when Michael starts working with French chanteuse Julie Marchand (Francoise Hardy). Michael likewise becomes jealous when Lily invites a young actor, Tom Richardson (Sam Westwood) over to rehearse lines.

    At a party, Julie insults Lily, not knowing the latter is fluent in French. Tom is there with his girlfriend Laura (Heather North). An argument ensues between Michael and the others as well as the popular television host Steve Scott (Paul Lynde). Steve gets a drink thrown in his face when Michael aims for Tom. This causes Julie to lose her much-publicized American television debut on Scott's show. Tom gets mad that Michael would accuse him of making moves on Lily and leaves the party alongside an upset Laura.

    After Lily calls Michael 'stubborn', she too leaves the party. The next morning, after Michael hasn't returned home, Lily goes looking for him, eventually discovering him sleeping in the one place he always threatens to escape to after an arguement--a subway car.

    At Lily's rehearsal, Tom fails to show up. The director tells Lily Tom has quit the show and rehearsals are off until a replacement is found. Lily, alongside Michael, who knows the truth, barge into Tom's apartment and find a distraught Tom who tells them that Laura has dumped him. Lily talks Tom into returning to the show, Michael apologizes to Tom, and the three set out to find Laura.

    The trio shows up at Laura's work (a Madison Avenue advertising firm where she works the front desk) and Tom pleads his case. She takes him back and the four go to find Julie. After Lily talks to Julie in French (even referring to Michael as a 'fool') they all set out to find Steve Scott.

    A series of comic misadventures ensue that result in Julie getting her television booking back (performing a cover of 'Catch A Falling Star') and Lily's show becoming a hit.

    Notes

    From Forgotten Films: 1966-1971 by Nolan Hendricks, 1998


    Don't Sleep In The Subway came about when production on a proposed film to star Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift for Warner Brothers fell through after Clift's death on July 23rd, 1966. [1]

    Sensing trouble on a Cleopatra level scale, Warner's scrapped the Taylor project. instead, the studio went in a different direction by going with a script by an upcoming writer-director named Edward O'Malley that could be shot quickly on a low budget. Warner Brothers Records star Petula Clark and fellow label act Francoise Hardy were the first signed and 'Don't Sleep In The Subway' was rushed into production for a late-1966 production date.

    Jeffrey Hunter was far from the first choice for the male lead. His star had slipped significantly over the last few years and the actor was doing frequent projects overseas. Producers wanted James Garner. Hunter would later credit 'Don't Sleep In The Subway' with reviving his career. [2]

    Reviews were mixed, Vincent Canby, then working for Variety, called the script 'stale'. However, in the same review, Clark and Hunter both received praise and up and comer Sam Westwood was touted as a 'name to watch out for'. The film is best known today for it's hit title track performed by Clark.

    O'Malley would later score an even bigger success later in the year when he received a co-writing credit for the James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service...

    Outtake From Sam Westwood's Hollywood

    After being asked about O'Malley

    Sam: It was 'Traffic Jam' where there were issues and he said things about me later on. We got along fine filming 'Subway'. 'Traffic Jam' is a completely different story (chuckles).

    It's well documented that Edward had a drinking problem and it eventually wrecked his career. I think watching him is what made Jeff realize he also had a problem, to be honest--

    [1]
    With Reflections In A Golden Eye not made ITTL, Warners (and a reluctant Jack Warner), with little else to promote, are forced to push Bonnie and Clyde from the get-go instead of trying to bury it for The Elizabeth Taylor/Marlon Brando film as IOTL.

    [2] Hunter doesn't make the movie that resulted in the on-set accident that later contributed to his OTL death. This also butterflies Hunter's OTL third marriage to soap opera star Emily McLaughlin.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2019
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  12. Threadmarks: Eye Of The Devil is released

    markedward Well-Known Member

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    From Mod Horror Super Special: A look at horror films in the 1960's by Nolan Hendricks, 1996:

    "After a rocky shoot, Eye Of The Devil would finally hit cinemas during July 1966. The film was a box office hit. Sharon Tate received positive reviews for her film debut as the villainous Odile de Caray. Tate's previous credits had consisted of either bit parts or roles on TV shows such as Mister Ed and The Beverly Hillbillies. Most of these early TV roles had been part of a seven-year contract Tate had signed with Filmways in 1963 under Martin Ransohoff. Despite rumors that her voice had been dubbed by a British actress, The film got Sharon Tate noticed. Ransohoff set about planning follow-up films for his new star. However, someone else in Hollywood saw Eye Of The Devil and wanted to use Tate as well. And he wasn't willing to take no for an answer.

    tumblr_ns8fecKbjj1sprhbeo1_1280.jpg
    Kim Novak and Sharon Tate in Eye Of The Devil (1966)

    Prior to Eye Of The Devil hitting movie theatres in the summer of 1966, Alfred Hitchcock asked to view a print of the film. The master of suspense reluctantly considered using Kim Novak (Vertigo), for his latest film production over at Universal. Following the mixed reviews coming in for his latest effort Torn Curtain, studio executives were less than thrilled with Hitchcock's decision to film an adaptation of the J.M. Barrie stage play Mary Rose.

    Legend has it that by the time Hitchcock had finished viewing Eye Of The Devil, Kim Novak was out. it was now Sharon Tate he was interested in casting. Upon learning that Tate was under exclusive contract to Martin Ranshoff at Filmways, Universal Pictures tried to talk the film legend into making a different film. However, Hitchcock was determined that he would do whatever he could to get Mary Rose off the ground with Sharon Tate as his star...
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2018
  13. Threadmarks: Sam Westwood is signed to Universal

    markedward Well-Known Member

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    From Sam Westwood's Hollywood

    Sam:
    Right after I shot 'Subway', Dick called and said he got me a contract at Universal. I wasn't thrilled, to be honest.

    He explained to me that it was for three years, there was a clause in my contract to do films for other studios, and it would help build my career up. Outside of Universal, I tested for 'The Graduate' alongside Goldie Hawn. I really wanted to play Benjamin Braddock. Everybody in town tested for that role. I'm reading for Benjamin Braddock, Goldie's reading for Elaine Robinson...

    Cut to Goldie Hawn on The Tonight Show, 1970

    Goldie: We're doing this audition and I just start giggling. And then Sam Westwood breaks character too and he starts laughing--

    Johnny Carson: It's hard to picture Sam Westwood laughing, Goldie.

    Goldie: Oh he's a really funny guy. Did you see 'Don't Sleep In The Subway'?

    JC: They told me not to sleep in the subway, so I didn't.

    Audience laughs while Goldie giggles and rolls her eyes.

    Goldie: He doesn't get to show that side a lot. Mike Nichols wasn't laughing (giggles)

    Cut back to Sam

    Sam: I'm surprised Goldie or myself even had careers after that incident. Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross...they were all good in it.

    Honestly, I'm glad it fell through. I wouldn't have been able to do 'Mary Rose' if things turned out differently.

    Interviewer: 'Subway' did ok. And you had a contract--

    Sam: There were some decent reviews.

    Dick wasn't very happy about how 'The Graduate' test went. He'd really put a lot of time and effort into convincing Mike Nichols that I was Benjamin Braddock. And I'd blown it. He called me up saying "Universal have a script, but you have to do a screen test. It's for Alfred Hitchcock, so please don't mess this one up".

    Hitchcock wanted me to do a screen test for 'Mary Rose' as the son. Sharon Tate had just got out of her contract with Martin Ransohoff. I had seen her in 'Eye Of The Devil' and the idea of possibly working with her and Hitchcock sounded intriguing.

    I auditioned for Hitchcock with Fay Compton.

    Interviewer: Were you aware of how she played into Hitchcock wanting to make the movie or who she was?

    Sam: No. Dick had to explain to me who Fay Compton was. It was a very intimidating audition. I was shocked when the call came back saying I had the part.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2018
  14. Threadmarks: Sam talks about TV

    markedward Well-Known Member

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    ***I don't generally take requests from readers, but I was trying to wrap this post up when claybaskit asked about Gidget. Seemed like a decent enough fit for Sam so that now brings us to the next post***

    Sam Westwood talking about TV, 1997 public radio interview excerpt found on YouTube

    The second thing I did was for television. I did an episode of 'Gidget'--

    (Sam is talking about episode 15 from the one-season wonder titled 'Now There's A Face'. He played a photography student named Tom Brighton)

    Interviewer: What was Sally Field like to work with?

    Sam: Sally was nice. It was a quick shoot, you know, TV. And only about the...second or third thing I appeared in. I was still under my first film contract.

    I: Did you actively pursue more film work as opposed to television?

    Sam: No. I was open to doing TV.

    I had another, less prominent guest spot on a sitcom with Phyllis Diller. End of 1966, I believe. All I remember is that my character's name was "Chub" (Sam laughs)

    I: What was 'What's My Line' like?

    Sam: It was like doing any other talk show or game show. You'd go in, do your thing and that was that. I was nervous the first time because, and you have to remember, I had been on film sets, but I hadn't done much live TV. It was when I was promoting an early film I did, 'Don't Sleep In The Subway'. Nobody guessed who I was that time (chuckles)

    Sometimes they'd have people who were celebrities on but the guests didn't have to wear masks because they weren't always familiar to the general public at that time in their careers--

    I: I think they did that with Arnold Palmer and, uh, Mary Quant--

    Sam: Yeah. I vaguely recall a few instances of that. They'd sign in with an X and Arlene Francis and the rest of the panel would have to guess.

    There was a young man on that had done a few commercials and they had to guess his name and what he had advertised. The panelists didn't have to wear masks for him. (laughs)

    I shared my dressing room with another guest, so we didn't really cross paths at that time. But, uh, about a year and a half later--
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2018
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  15. Unknown Member

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    You know who Mike Nichols wanted for the role of the main character in the Graduate? Burt Ward--yes, Burt Ward, Robin in the campy Batman tv show (if you believe Burt's autobiography; Burt's bosses on Batman prevented him from taking the role because they feared that Robin's character would be diluted if they saw him in another role)...
     
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  16. OldNavy1988 Well-Known Member

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    Nice job so far.
     
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  17. Threadmarks: The Films of Judy Garland 1965-1969

    markedward Well-Known Member

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    The Films Of Judy Garland, 1965-1969

    Judy Garland talks about her mid-late 1960's films on The Dick Cavett Show, 1974. The musical film legend has just been asked by Cavett about her appearance in the 1965 flop Harlow opposite Carol Lynley

    Judy: After rehearsing for about three weeks, I said to Carol Lynley "Carol, this is going to be a piece of...trash. I’m quitting"--

    Cavett: You didn't say "trash" though, did you?

    Judy (Laughing): You rat! Anyway, after I promised Carol I would stick around, we learned of the other Harlow with Carroll Baker. Then both of us tried to quit. Of course, they threatened to sue so we finished. What a lousy picture!

    Cavett: After that, you did 'Valley Of The Dolls'

    Judy: Another gem-- (Judy rolls her eyes)

    Judy and Cavett chuckle while the audience laughs

    Judy: Look, I absolutely loved working with Patty Duke, and Jean Seberg and Barbara Parkins. And I got to sing. But--

    Cavett: That was an impressive cast

    Judy: (nods) Unfortunately, it was not a very good movie, but those girls really saved it.

    Cavett: Wasn't Sharon Tate supposed to play Jennifer before Jean Seberg was cast?

    Judy: Yes, I believe so. I did do a truly awful, awful film after that--

    Cavett: 'Angel, Angel Down We Go'?

    Judy: Yes. That period of my life is when I was in the absolute gutter. I got married briefly and nearly died before the picture came out. Anyway, regarding the film, I needed the money and was too hopped up on pills to realize what a piece of garbage it was until filming. Poor Roddy McDowall was in that too. I said to him "Roddy, I have a feeling we're not at MGM anymore!" (laughs)

    Cavett: It seems like in the last ten years though, you are less affected by negative reviews--

    Judy: I decided to search for a good script after, even if it took me years. And I had to get off the pills. I wanted to prove the critics wrong, that I wasn't washed up, and it took some time but I did do it. (smiles)

    Cavett: It was around then that you made comments about the gay rights movement.

    Judy: Reporters kept, you know, pressuring me at the time. Poking at me, you know. A reporter asked me "Judy, how do you feel about the Stonewall riots?"

    Cavett: And you felt put on the spot.

    Judy: Well, yes, I did. I said "Look you can let people push you around for so long until you just can't take it anymore. So, yes I understand why they went out and caused a commotion. If you were treated like that wouldn't you snap too?"

    Footage of Judy Garland on the red carpet at a film premiere, 1973

    Judy is there dressed elegantly alongside oldest child Liza Minnelli, fresh off the success of her Oscar-nominated turn in Cabaret. Minnelli is wearing a Halston gown. Daughter Lorna and son Joey are also with the duo. Judy, despite being ravaged by years of substance abuse, looks healthier than she did four years back in her previous movie, having made a conscious effort to kick drugs and alcohol.

    “This is the first movie in years I am truly proud of having made. I hope you all enjoy watching it tonight as much as we all enjoyed making it. And I am happy to have my family by my side tonight with me...”

    Judy Garland, talking about Valley Of The Dolls to After Dark Magazine, early 1978. This would turn out to be Garland's final magazine interview.

    "Oh, I know that it was an awful movie, even though I got some great reviews for my musical number. Did you know that there are midnight showings of it and fans will show up dressed as Neely and Helen? Lorna took me to one in New York some time back and I started coming by to do Q&A sessions with the fans after. They love it!"
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2018
  18. markedward Well-Known Member

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    I very nearly went with that for this TL! XD
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
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  19. markedward Well-Known Member

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    Thanks.

    Just to let you all know, I'll probably marathon post like this on days off depending how much is written in advance because I don't get a lot of time on work days.
     
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  20. Threadmarks: Goldie Hawn

    markedward Well-Known Member

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    Snippets from Variety circa late 1966

    "Connery announces On Her Majesty's Secret Service to be his last James Bond Movie"

    "Sharon Tate has had her contract with Martin Ransohoff bought out by Universal Pictures. The Eye Of The Devil star is set to star in an adaptation of the J.M. Barrie play Mary Rose for Alfred Hitchcock. Tate, who was scheduled to film Don't Make Waves for MGM as part of her contract with Ransohoff. The Tony Curtis vehicle will now feature newcomer Goldie Hawn"

    "Repulsion director Roman Polanski has started work on his latest film Fearless Vampire Killers. The Martin Ransohoff production will star actress Jill St. John (The Oscar)"

    From Forgotten Films: 1966-1971 by Nolan Hendricks, 1998

    goldie.jpg

    Goldie Hawn

    Goldie Hawn had a not particularly enjoyable experience making her debut film Don't Make Waves opposite Tony Curtis.

    As Hawn would recall years later: "The atmosphere on set was already tense and it became worse when there was an accident on set"

    The accident Hawn referred to happened when an uncredited stuntman drowned to death attempting to parachute into the Pacific Ocean.

    The film was originally intended as a vehicle for Sharon Tate, who was replaced with the unknown Hawn after Tate's contract with producer Martin Ransohoff was bought out by Universal Pictures. MGM went all out to promote Hawn. Promotional gimmicks included an extensive publicity campaign based largely on Hawn and her character, Malibu. Life-sized cardboard cutouts of Hawn wearing a bikini were placed in cinema foyers throughout the United States. Hawn also took part in an advertising campaign for Coppertone.

    Sadly, despite the heavy promotion and title track from The Byrds, Don't Make Waves fell flat at the box office, earning 1.25 million.

    As Tony Curtis would later point out "It was a beach picture. And by then nobody wanted to see that"

    Hawn still managed to get positive reviews for her performance. Unfortunately, it didn't translate into other roles right away. There was one offer to test for Elaine in The Graduate opposite Sam Westwood which according to both parties didn't go well. It wouldn't be until January 1968 when Hawn became a regular on TV's Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In that her career truly took off..."
     
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