Royal Flying Host (alt-RAF)

Logical though they might have wanted to avoid overly Germanic names due to the circumstances of the time, hence I think why they went for the Celtic "Ardian". Another Celtic name instead might be better...

Good Point. What about Speurtriath (sky chief) ? Would it be awkward for a native anglophone to pronounce ? Another option is the welsh Awyrprif (same meaning)
 
Grey Wolf's comment gave me a rethink about some of the insignias. As I envisage the squadron to be the largest permanent unit of the RFH, the squadron leader should be the highest officer of its level (nowaday in the RAF a squadron is apparently often commanded by a wing commander but one assume this is just inflation).

So the SL gets 4 silver stars instead of a gold one and the reeve and banneret each loses one.
 
Apart from the helmets worn by field squadrons in combat situations and those of pilots, the sole headgear of the Royal Flying Host is the side cap worn on every occasion. It is of the same blue colour as the uniform and is decorated on the left side with a badge that varies depending on the rank level of the wearer.

EDIT: new Iteration

hat-badge-table.jpg
 
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Apart from the helmets worn by field squadrons in combat situations and those of pilots, the sole headgear of the Royal Flying Host is the side cap worn on every occasion.
EDIT: new Iteration
Not for the Ardians and Lyftwards. When they are in the company of Admirals and Generals they have to look like men of the same status. In side caps they are going to look like underlings just as beret and sailor hat wearers do. Sorry, but please "proper" peaked hats with plenty of scrambled eggs for them.
 
Not for the Ardians and Lyftwards. When they are in the company of Admirals and Generals they have to look like men of the same status. In side caps they are going to look like underlings just as beret and sailor hat wearers do. Sorry, but please "proper" peaked hats with plenty of scrambled eggs for them.

I had envisioned that the upper echelon had their side cap's edges decorated a bit like a canadian air force general only more intricate. the other officers would probably also have some sort of embelishement.

59634918-lieutenant-general.jpg
 
I had envisioned that the upper echelon had their side cap's edges decorated a bit like a canadian air force general only more intricate. the other officers would probably also have some sort of embelishement.
Nice picture and the jacket helps. However, we are taking about the premier air force of the world ;) commanded by gentlemen of the British Empire. Sorry, but that side cap still looks like the head gear of a lackey, or even worse an artisan.
 
Nice picture and the jacket helps. However, we are taking about the premier air force of the world ;) commanded by gentlemen of the British Empire. Sorry, but that side cap still looks like the head gear of a lackey, or even worse an artisan.

still a bit reticent, ont thing I wanted to do was for the RFH to develop traditions that didn't copy too much the other services when possible.

One thing to remember is that the image you have of it is probably based on your experience in OTL, if you lived in an ATL where ardians had worn since 1919 in most commonwealth countries a side cap with wide gold lacing edging, you would probably have a different view of it.
 
I like the headgear, although I've always had an egalitarian mindset to enlisted-officer status; to me, the "officer and a gentleman" philosophy was outdated the moment warfare ceased to be about "gentlemen's disagreements".
 
to me, the "officer and a gentleman" philosophy was outdated the moment warfare ceased to be about "gentlemen's disagreements".
Warfare has not always been about gentlemen's agreements because it preceded gentlemen. They are only able to hijack it because they could afford the natty gear (chariot, horses, flash bow, even flashier duds, etc) whilst the peasant made do with cheap weapons. Even then they would cheat, eg even cads were not supposed to kill chariot drivers, although they of course did :eek:

Then again some people like steppe nomads what with their stealing, knives in the back and running away never "got it." Not that they were not successful, but they were not gentlemen.
 

Krall

Banned
Good Point. What about Speurtriath (sky chief) ? Would it be awkward for a native anglophone to pronounce ? Another option is the welsh Awyrprif (same meaning)

I just saw this now, and - as a native English speaker - pronouncing "Speurtriath" and "Awyrprif" shouldn't really be a problem. It's a little difficult trying to figure out the correct pronunciation from the spelling, but "Lieutenant" is pronounced as "Lef-ten-ent" in British English, so the spelling being wildly different from the phonetic pronunciation isn't really an issue.
 
I still say Steadholder is a better sounding title than Lieutenant, no matter how one pronounces it :p

I realise that "gentlemen's war" was also a relatively recent concept compared to the Late Roman and earlier eras; I guess we can blame the feudal period for that nonsense. In any event, I've always looked at relations between officers and enlisted as being less "Lord-Servant", but rather "Older Brother-Little Brother"; having a commission doesn't make one better than anybody, or more worthy, it's just that SOMEBODY has to be in charge.

Anyway, regarding the subject at hand, I like "Awyrprif" better since it seems somewhat more phonetically simple than the alternative (not that I find Lyftward to be a bad choice at all).
 
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