Rock albums from alternate timelines

Seeing as I haven't posted in any other thread but my own to this point, I thought I'd contribute.



All Things Must Pass by The Beatles
Release Dates: February 11 (UK) & February 15 (US), 1972
Label/Number: Apple 20

SIDE 1
1. Maybe I'm Amazed (McCartney) v-Paul
2. All Things Must Pass (Harrison) v-George
3. Cold Turkey (Harrison-Lennon) v-George & Ringo
4. Ballad Of Sir Frankie Crisp (Harrison) v-George
5. I'm The Greatest (Lennon) v-Ringo
6. Another Day (McCartney) v-Paul
7. Imagine (Lennon) v-John

SIDE 2
1. My Sweet Lord (Harrison) v-George, bv-John & Paul
2. Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey v-Paul, bv-Pattie Harrison & Jane McCartney
3. Apple Scruffs (Harrison) v-George
4. Oh Cynthia! (Lennon) v-John
5. It Don't Come Easy (Harrison-Starkey) v-Ringo, bv-George
6. The Back Seat Of My Car (McCartney) v-Paul
7. Working Class Hero (Lennon) v-John

Background:
Simply put, The Beatles did not break up in 1970. They did however, take one year off from each other after eight years of continuous output. In 1971, they got back together and recorded this album. Of note is that Paul married Jane Asher and John remained married to Cynthia ITTL. The album received a nomination for Album Of The Year and "Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey" was nominated for Record Of The Year in the US.
 
Strictly for the 80's Metal folk here.


Following the tragic death of band leader Ozzy Osbourne (in the crash of a light aircraft joyriding incident on March 19th, 1982), guitarist Randy Rhoads reunites with his original bandmates Bob Daisley (Bass) and Lee Kerslake (Drums). With producer Max Norman at the console they start tracking new material and begin the search for a lead vocalist, with a view towards "continuing the Ozzy legacy".

This (given what happened a short while ago...Sharon firing the guys from Uriah Heep) sends Sharon off the deep end, her meal ticket has just checked out after all.
After a brief series of brutal negotiations (Ozzy and Sharon had not married at the time of his death) Jet Records agrees to an amendment of the extant arrangement, placing the direction of this "new" band under the direction of Sharon's father Don Arden.
Sharon fades into oblivion...

After dozens of auditions Don Arden meets a vocalist with an amazing range from Washington State, who is in an unsigned band called "The Mob".

Seeing this as a fast track to a record deal, Geoff Tate agrees to join in July of 1982.

The rest is history.
My challenge to you?
Write this history...the possibilities are rather mind boggling.
The tough thing is that Chris De Garmo was the primary writer for much of the classic QR music, and due to Randy's untimely demise (and abbreviated recording history) we are not left with a vast collection of unrecorded RR material.
One thing is for certain. The guy (Randy:natch) could punch out catchy riffage all day long.
The two Blizzard of Ozz albums (recorded virtually "back to back" with a brief UK tour between them) are a testament to how prolific a writing team Randy (riffs) and Bob (vocal melodies and lyrics) were.
Throw Tate's ideas (Ozzy had little to contribute...he was a total mess at the time) in there and that's where this little chicken grows wings.

Butterflies also have wings.

I'm interested in the butterflies...this would be an epic band imo.
 
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SGT. PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND
(1967)

Side A

1. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Elvis and The Beatles)
2. Down In The Alley (Elvis)
3. Getting Better All The Time (McCartney with Lennon)
4. With A Little Help From My Friends (Starr)
5. The Love Machine (Elvis)
6. She's Leaving Home (McCartney with Elvis)

Side B
1. Within You Without You (Harrison)
2. When I'm Sixty Four (McCartney)
3. I'll Take Love (Elvis)
4. Good Morning Good Morning (Lennon)
5. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise) (Elvis, McCartney, Lennon)
6. A Day in the Life (Lennon with McCartney and Elvis)

Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band is considered by many to be the greatest album ever made. It was lauded by critics for its innovations in production, songwriting and graphic design, for bridging a cultural divide between popular music and high art, and for providing a musical representation of its generation and the contemporary counterculture. Before the recording of the album, Elvis' long time manager Col. Tom Parker died of a heart attack. Parker was placed on the cover as a tribute to him. Many famous faces can be seen on the cover including deceased movie stars like James Dean and Marylin Monroe, and Elvis' mother Gladys on the cover. After this album Elvis would go on to record a gospel album entitled How Great Thou Art, while The Beatles would retire from touring.

(Can you name everyone on the cover?)
 
Strictly for the 80's Metal folk here.


Following the tragic death of band leader Ozzy Osbourne (in the crash of a light aircraft joyriding incident on March 19th, 1982), guitarist Randy Rhoads reunites with his original bandmates Bob Daisley (Bass) and Lee Kerslake (Drums). With producer Max Norman at the console they start tracking new material and begin the search for a lead vocalist, with a view towards "continuing the Ozzy legacy".

This (given what happened a short while ago...Sharon firing the guys from Uriah Heep) sends Sharon off the deep end, her meal ticket has just checked out after all.
After a brief series of brutal negotiations (Ozzy and Sharon had not married at the time of his death) Jet Records agrees to an amendment of the extant arrangement, placing the direction of this "new" band under the direction of Sharon's father Don Arden.
Sharon fades into oblivion...

After dozens of auditions Don Arden meets a vocalist with an amazing range from Washington State, who is in an unsigned band called "The Mob".

Seeing this as a fast track to a record deal, Geoff Tate agrees to join in July of 1982.

The rest is history.
My challenge to you?
Write this history...the possibilities are rather mind boggling.
The tough thing is that Chris De Garmo was the primary writer for much of the classic QR music, and due to Randy's untimely demise (and abbreviated recording history) we are not left with a vast collection of unrecorded RR material.
One thing is for certain. The guy (Randy:natch) could punch out catchy riffage all day long.
The two Blizzard of Ozz albums (recorded virtually "back to back" with a brief UK tour between them) are a testament to how prolific a writing team Randy (riffs) and Lee (vocal melodies and lyrics) were.
Throw Tate's ideas (Ozzy had little to contribute...he was a total mess at the time) in there and that's where this little chicken grows wings.

Butterflies also have wings.

I'm interested in the butterflies...this would be an epic band imo.
IMO Queensryche never topped The Warning, an eternal classic US power metal release. Stripped of their singer, perhaps they'll recruit Warrell Dane (of Sanctuary and more famously of Nevermore) as vocalist. Or maybe Paul Davidson of Heir Apparent (they'd be as important to prog metal as Fates Warning had they not broke up)? Or Ted Pilot of Fifth Angel? Or even one of the singers from Portland's Glacier (seriously underrated USPM)? I won't pretend to be an expert in the 80s USPM/American metal scene in the PNW or anywhere (though my father laughs how he saw Fates Warning with John Arch ages ago in Springfield MA back in the 80s which I can never see) but there was some serious potential in the records PNW USPM bands released which fans of 80s US metal recognise as classic releases.

So while Randy Rhoads and Geoff Tate create an 80s metal legacy (they will), back in Seattle Chris DeGarmo nabs him a new singer and puts out some alternate version of The Warning. TTL's Queensryche might be readily called the "West Coast Fates Warning" (or Fates Warning the "East Coast Queensryche"). Now Seattle and the PNW was ground zero for grunge which throws a wrench into things. Empire and onwards Queensryche put out some decent songs among endless filler and utter garbage (Hear in the Now Frontier and Q2K are just dumb and Tribe hilariously so). Maybe without Geoff Tate this alt-Queensryche would develop a different sound, like perhaps what Fates Warning or Savatage did in the 90s. So Operation Mindcrime with a different singer will still be famous but maybe on the level of Savatage's Streets so a bit more of a cult classic. Same with their hypothetical Empire album. I'd certainly hope TTL's Queensryche never made an equivalent to any album after Empire since those were utter garbage. But maybe they balance their prog sound with other influences and make something like Savatage's Edge of Thorns or Fates Warning's Parallels or Inside Out. An album like Fates Warning's A Perfect Shade of Gray might be possible, since Jim Matheos intended it to go in the opposite direction of the previous two albums (so basically the opposite direction 90s Queensryche went with the grunge influence). Like APSOG it will be a prog metal classic.

Randy Rhoads has Geoff Tate singing in his band which will be legendary TTL, even if they'll no doubt make a few mediocre/garbage albums in the 90s going with the grunge/nu metal trend.. Perhaps Helloween TTL will become more famous since even OTL Michael Kiske was compared to Geoff Tate (at least "I Want Out" might chart higher). Although like Geoff Tate, Kiske had no passion for metal and sang on albums like Chameleon or his solo stuff, although Kiske's output the last few decades is pretty solid hard rock (far better than Tate's output--the Queensryche lawsuit was hilariously dumb).
 
IMO Queensryche never topped The Warning, an eternal classic US power metal release. Stripped of their singer, perhaps they'll recruit Warrell Dane (of Sanctuary and more famously of Nevermore) as vocalist. Or maybe Paul Davidson of Heir Apparent (they'd be as important to prog metal as Fates Warning had they not broke up)? Or Ted Pilot of Fifth Angel? Or even one of the singers from Portland's Glacier (seriously underrated USPM)? I won't pretend to be an expert in the 80s USPM/American metal scene in the PNW or anywhere (though my father laughs how he saw Fates Warning with John Arch ages ago in Springfield MA back in the 80s which I can never see) but there was some serious potential in the records PNW USPM bands released which fans of 80s US metal recognise as classic releases.

So while Randy Rhoads and Geoff Tate create an 80s metal legacy (they will), back in Seattle Chris DeGarmo nabs him a new singer and puts out some alternate version of The Warning. TTL's Queensryche might be readily called the "West Coast Fates Warning" (or Fates Warning the "East Coast Queensryche"). Now Seattle and the PNW was ground zero for grunge which throws a wrench into things. Empire and onwards Queensryche put out some decent songs among endless filler and utter garbage (Hear in the Now Frontier and Q2K are just dumb and Tribe hilariously so). Maybe without Geoff Tate this alt-Queensryche would develop a different sound, like perhaps what Fates Warning or Savatage did in the 90s. So Operation Mindcrime with a different singer will still be famous but maybe on the level of Savatage's Streets so a bit more of a cult classic. Same with their hypothetical Empire album. I'd certainly hope TTL's Queensryche never made an equivalent to any album after Empire since those were utter garbage. But maybe they balance their prog sound with other influences and make something like Savatage's Edge of Thorns or Fates Warning's Parallels or Inside Out. An album like Fates Warning's A Perfect Shade of Gray might be possible, since Jim Matheos intended it to go in the opposite direction of the previous two albums (so basically the opposite direction 90s Queensryche went with the grunge influence). Like APSOG it will be a prog metal classic.

Randy Rhoads has Geoff Tate singing in his band which will be legendary TTL, even if they'll no doubt make a few mediocre/garbage albums in the 90s going with the grunge/nu metal trend.. Perhaps Helloween TTL will become more famous since even OTL Michael Kiske was compared to Geoff Tate (at least "I Want Out" might chart higher). Although like Geoff Tate, Kiske had no passion for metal and sang on albums like Chameleon or his solo stuff, although Kiske's output the last few decades is pretty solid hard rock (far better than Tate's output--the Queensryche lawsuit was hilariously dumb).
I'm a little more lenient in my interpretation of the historical QR Discography. I (now) think that some of the work on Rage for Order is groundbreaking in it's time. Were it not for the laughable effort of their label dressing them up like bad circus clowns, they would have gotten a lot more respect. I lived this era (natch!) and saw them supporting AC/DC (of all bands! LOL) on the 23 of August, 1986 in Edmonton.
This was probably one of the worst mismatches between an opener and a headliner that I've ever witnessed.
The AC/DC "peeps" were not into what the band was about...not at all.
For that matter? Neither was I at the time.
Odd time signatures and weird chord voicings were a tougher sell in those days.
I didn't even want to go see AC/DC for that matter...it was just "something to do". One of my buds had just ditched his girlfriend and gave me her ticket.
I was really late (relatively speaking) getting into what Queensryche had going on (musically) back in those days.
The "painted faces" in all of the media of the time made me go UGH!
Yngwie wasn't painting himself up like a circus clown. Neither were EVH or Hetfield.
Their (Queensryche's) corporate management's approach screwed them out of a much more profitable "sophomore" year and that is sad.
I (as a guitarist) was always drawn to the "cream" of this era and it took time/analysis before I was able to appreciate this and give Whip and C De G the props they so rightly earned on these early recordings.

Bless you Sheila (1990-1999)...the only good thing I left our relationship with was an appreciation for Queensryche.
It was actually when I stepped back from "player" to "listener" that I was able to calm down a little and figure out just how epic the (early QR) music was.
From there I tried my best to support thru the early half of the 90's but the world had evolved...
A couple of the most promising new guitar based acts (Skid Row and Extreme) died a horrible death in this period.
I was still an active (gigging) player and had most of this stuff under my belt at the time. "My" guitar solo was recreating "For the Love of God", with a pretty good degree of accuracy in 1989. Also the DLR band stuff from Eat 'em and Smile and stuff from Painkiller and the mandatory "Get the Funk Out" thing.

It was such a weird time to be a 25 year old "hot rod" on the guitar.

Shortly after this, the entire bar band scene collapsed here in Alberta/Western Canada.
 
The Beach Boys - River Songs (1976)
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SIDE 1
1. Rainbows - (D. Wilson - C. Wilson - Kalinich)
2. Back Home - (B. Wilson - Norman)
3. Had to Phone Ya - (B. Wilson - M. Wilson - Love)
4. Pacific Ocean Blues - (D. Wilson - Love)
5. Everyone’s In Love With You - (Love)

SIDE 2
1. It’s OK - (B. Wilson - Love)
2. Susie Cincinnati - (Jardine)
3. Sherry She Needs Me - (B. Wilson - Titelman)
4. We’re All Singing (That Same Song) - (B. Wilson - Love)
5. River Song - (D. Wilson - C. Wilson)

Upon release, River Songs attracted attention from critics and fans alike who were coming down from the immense success of Endless Summer which gave them their biggest success since Pet Sounds in 1966, peaking at #2. Only being held down from the #1 spot by The Beatles’ Face To Face.

Critics praised the album for it’s progressive nature and increased production from Brian, who hadn’t fully produced a Beach Boys album since 1968’s Friends.

Brian had a newfound confidence from the success and critical praise of the album which started a line of fully Brian-produced albums. Like Love You, Adult/Child, L.A. Light, Endless Harmony, and ending at 1987’s Love and Mercy.
 
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