Rewriting History: The History of an Alternate Space Program

Part 1: intro to series, and the events of AS-204, later known as Apollo 1
This TL isn't focused on being purely technical and 100% accurate, it's all more for fun


Before I start, creds go to the creators of boldly going, eyes turned skyward for inspiration, and @Antiantiperson on Twitter for mission patches.
some ideas for vehicles come from Eyes Turned skyward, primarily the Saturn IC, however, this may change in the future...


Rewriting history Part I "Under the Umbrella Of Fire"



1662414722718.png

Apollo 1 astronaut Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom leads fellow crew member Roger B. Chaffee across the Crew Access Arm to the White Room to enter the Apollo Command Module (CM). The third crew member Edward H. White followed shortly after.​

January 27th, 1967
The crew: Gus Grissom, Edward H. White II, and Roger B. Chaffee, boarded their Apollo I capsule in anticipation of the upcoming tests which were due to be performed by the crew in the next couple of hours that they would spend inside of the command module. the crew experienced constant communication issues between them and the control centers in the blockhouse and the ACE room due to static caused by an unidentified microphone that was left out in the open. At 6 pm the instruction was given to Grissom to proceed with the simulated hot fire test of the reaction control system of the service module, this test was completed successfully despite the communication issues, which from there continued further. After the test, it became evident to Chauvin that, at simulated launch time, when the umbilicals would disconnect from the spacecraft the hardline communications link would be lost, so a switch to just S-band communications was in order, after a small pause in communications the crew was back on, firstly testing each one of the astronaut's communications status, after going through all 3 of the astronauts there was still no solution to the irritating sounds of microphone static.

The count down was approaching t-10 minutes and the issues were still at large, just the communication was a struggle in itself, the already agitated Gus complained "How are we going to get to the Moon if we can't talk between two buildings", White chimed it letting Grissom know "they can't hear a thing you're saying". The astronaut's frustration was shared by the control centers, the entire afternoon was spent attempting to fix the communication issue and the simulated lift-off was approaching fast. It was becoming evident that this simulated launch may not be happening today in full.
At 6:30:55 pm the engineers who were monitoring spacecraft systems noticed a voltage spike in one of the electrical busses amongst other strange electrical signals, a mere 10 seconds later one of the astronauts, presumably Grissom over the comms, yelled: "fire" followed by White "Hey! we got a fire in the cockpit" evidently the fire started from the side that Grissom was on and the second to notice was White. The quick reaction of Commander Gus Grissom resulted in the hatch being blown right off the command module as he pulled the pin, the hatch was blown quite the distance away, luckily no ground crew was injured by the hatch, and the ground crew rushed to help the crew of Apollo 1, pulling them out of the command module within a matter of seconds, only Gus and White suffered minor burns on their faces, and some of the ground crew had also inhaled quite a substantial amount of smoke and received 1st to 2nd-degree burns on arms and hands.
The crew was away from the command module and the fire stopped quickly as the Earth's atmosphere rushed into the 100% oxygen environment, snuffing the fire out, the capsule had been scorched quite well nonetheless. This was a stroke of brilliant, and at the same time, horrible decision-making by NASA, it was initially thought to be a good idea not to include any explosive bolts for this test, it was deemed too dangerous for the ground crew and completely unnecessary as NASA was sure no accidents could happen, yet it became a given gift for the crew, saving them from an incident which could of very well cost them their lives.
The crew of Apollo 1 had almost predicted their disaster after they jokingly posed praying upon their spacecraft as they believed it was dangerous, with all of the flammable material, exposed wire, and weird, inward opening hatch...

1662413291583.png
And sadly they were correct, this was a horrible moment for NASA but it could have turned out much worse, this mission delayed the apollo program by 14 months, while NASA prepared and tested the new Apollo block II spacecraft which would be a much bigger upgrade over the Block I, less flammable equipment and most importantly the atmosphere was changed to an oxygen/nitrogen mixture, which was much closer to what was encountered at sea level.

The Apollo capsule was taken away for investigation and the crew went in for medical checkups, the exact cause wasn't discovered at first and is still not entirely known about to this day, however, it is well assumed that it was an electrical issue, presumably due to an electrical spark to the left side of Grissom, this spark quickly turned into a large fire due to the 100% oxygen atmosphere within the command module. further investigation was done to realize, analyze and subsequently make the design changes to create a safer version of the Apollo command module, removing all the fire hazards, making a new hatch, and changing the atmosphere. The next Apollo flight is scheduled to be Apollo 4, the first uncrewed test flight of the Saturn V.

This concludes my first post here, feel free to give constructive criticism. thank you for reading!
1662414853789.png
 
Last edited:
I’m reading another version of this on the KSP forums......

y no Moon landing in 66 here?
 
I’m reading another version of this on the KSP forums......

y no Moon landing in 66 here?
Yep also mine, old idea, I've rebooted the series about 3 times now. And yeah moon landing in 66 won't happen here, just doesn't make much sense unless I make the Apollo program happen earlier but that's just too much changing
 
Part 2: the aftermath and the launch of Apollo 4
Rewriting History Post 2:
“It’s time”


G1RbTUR4-sXvM01ekQEwz4prwbHvrvgvu0ZIsZJV4iqqxt00G7HtQSMObPvKcfKNgGIuLmVa7qM5BIgm63aKHvgZjfHNftk8uiiU5JHHCgDOpuJgkAHiV_Scq1g7VmFPZgxCPiecPeQHMC__J44O9BCkECtMSYJ_XuTLI5Krpp6FA4cJg9-yX-qPEg

NASA administrators sit at the witness table before the Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Services, chaired by Senator Clinton P. Anderson, on the Apollo 1 (Apollo 204) accident. The individuals are (L to R) Dr. Robert C. Seamans, NASA Deputy Administrator; James E. Webb, NASA Administrator; Dr. George E. Mueller, Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, and Maj. Gen. Samuel C. Phillips, Apollo Program Director. (Image credit: NASA)

A month before the Apollo 1 fire, commander Gus Grissom was asked about the possibility of his and the crew’s death, to which he promptly responded by saying: “You sort of have to put that out of your mind. There's always a possibility that you can have a catastrophic failure, of course; this can happen on any flight; it can happen on the last one as well as the first one. So, you just plan as best you can to take care of all these eventualities, and you get a well-trained crew and you go fly.”

Following the fire, and of course the egress of the crew, several specialists arrived at launch complex 34, prior to entering the command module several external and internal photos were taken. After all the picture-taking was complete the two specialists entered the command module, maintaining caution to not disturb any of the evidence, to inspect and verify the positions and locations of numerous electrical components, or their remains, as well as take numerous photos. Over their time spent inside the command module performing visual checks, they managed to conclude the distance that the fire had managed to spread and the amount of damage caused by said fire. Of course, these were merely visual checks and more was ahead when the command module would be disassembled and each component would be checked over. Throughout the visual check-ups performed a total of 100 photos were taken. The exterior was also inspected by several investigation board members. The 012 command module would be moved away from pad 34 and was now in plan to be disassembled, however first certain techniques would have to be developed to be able to disassemble the command module, in the following days CSM-014 would be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to be disassembled and subsequently scrapped in order to develop proper techniques needed to take apart the 012 part by part. The disassembly plan was in full speed by the 7th of January and during this entire ordeal, a total of 5000 photos were taken, after each part was taken out of the command module a detailed photograph was taken of it, this step-by-step photography is what resulted in such a high amount of photos taken.

Each part that was taken off was closely inspected and photographed after which it was appropriately tagged and sealed off in clean plastic containers, these were of course the smaller components such as electrical connectors and tubing joints, etc. After they were sealed the components were transported to their storage location, under the required security. A few days later on the 17th of the same month, the board decided that it was necessary to move the CSM-012 to the NASA pyrotechnics installation building at KSC where proper working conditions were available for the further required disassembly.

uflX3BPmLvtLRitMBCzWdbqMFp5DsCe2A4dLgtQcdGaFlNP56vxFkPuKsfpesu20cWDdorV-gJSH23zpQu_NxkZ6wctVHQonu1s6cHt3IGQGl4XwZb760EFxkC6mWFWDyd42O2LUSv5EtjwETFmz5Tn0IqsNbGbYHggc9wsZl4JEKgz4SsJ3oIvDKg

Here the CSM-012 can be seen at the NASA pyrotechnics installation building at KSC
On January 27th, 1967

At the PIB at KSC, it was determined that the investigation and the analysis could continue further at a steady and comfortable pace for the workers, two 8-hour shifts per day for six days a week was enough to keep up with the schedule set by the Board. The disassembly was finished on the 27th of January 1967, 10 days after the command module arrived at the building. From here the Board could release a report on how the fire happened and what the exact reason was, however they were not able to point to the specific perpetrator of the fire, they did point out the conditions which caused the fire those being:
  1. A sealed capsule with a 100% oxygen atmosphere
  2. A large amount of flammable material within the command module
  3. Vulnerable plumbing carrying a combustible and corrosive cooling liquid
  4. Vulnerable and exposed electrical wiring
And of course, it was said that had NASA not installed a pyrotechnic emergency hatch this whole incident could have ended badly, with loss of crew and greater delays in the entire program. The decision to add the blow-hatch was given praise, even though it is seemingly the bare minimum, which Grissom pointed out when interviewed after his medical check-up along with the other astronauts: “While I cannot argue that it was a smart decision to include this emergency hatch on our command module, it wasn’t even the decision of the engineers, we were the ones to voice our concerns for the capsule and our safety and the safety of pad crew, clearly there is some sort of issue here with the decision making that we are not addressing” he voiced his concerns quite well and NASA was forced to re-evaluate their safety standards. But in reality, the culprit behind the ocean of issues that they have been facing was due to Kennedy’s ambitious deadline of putting men on the moon by the end of the 60s, which NASA is desperately trying to pursue…

In conclusion, the fire has made quite the impact on the agency, bringing about many changes, and setting Apollo back by just around 14 months, after which Apollo 4 will take to the skies, the first flight of a Saturn V launch vehicle, which will test fly the Apollo CSM alongside a test article version of the LM. this time around, crewed flights will be much different, the white room has had some additions, such as better fire fighting equipment, and the Block II command module will be much different from the Block I; new hatch design, insulated electrical wiring, less flammable materials, and a mixed atmosphere, and this time around the blow-hatch will not be needed as the new design allows the hatch to be opened in a matter of seconds, during an emergency the hatch can be opened in around 2-5 seconds from the outside and just a bit longer from the inside. The hatch will be ready to fly on apollo 6 the final unmanned test flight of the Apollo program, after which Apollo 7 will be ready to fly with humans.

September 25, 1967
Apollo 4 unnamed Saturn V test flight


It was now time, the great Saturn V sits atop its launch platform at LC39A ready for its first test flight. It will carry a block I styled SM and a Block I command module with certain improvements that will fly on Block II and a Lunar module test article. It aims to test the CM heatshield at Lunar reentry speeds. This mission will fly a Block I CM however with a few changes for certification purposes, as no Block II CM was ready to fly yet NASA opted to just make upgrades to Block I. the hatch window was replaced with the testing panel simulating the seals and the exterior heatshield, and the bottom heatshield was replaced with a Block II heatshield for the intended Lunar speed re-entry. The CM module lacked seats since it carried no crew, which allowed NASA engineers to install equipment that would let mission control take control of the spacecraft remotely, a camera was also included to take pictures out of one of the CM windows on its final orbit.

In addition to the CSM, the flight also carried a test article of a lunar module (ascent and descent stages) the descent stage tanks were filled with a mixture of water, glycol, and freon and the ascent stage was just a ballast mockup made out of aluminum without any of the flight systems being included. The SLA and LTA were instrumented to measure the amount of stress on the CSM and LM during the flight to orbit.




B8mPielGwl4MriLvTTXSJb5vLvEI_eOOU0ScfgK5hkBk8c87HxcWooZ-FBe3_g3Nd3csLkem8ieON6xUJOsJF483ZQzkAjI2ZooI3flz7t5hamKV9WSe7x-xOZioeoZMftgI07L3sPxV9TWcCciNtauJJE_SUzGWETer1NQYRBN5Hf71Xd5WVzSl

Saturn V SA-501 is being rolled out to LC-39A past the mobile servicing structure (MSS)

Apollo 4 was the first mission to fly under the new apollo numbering system, approved by Mueller a few months prior, and subsequently, AS-204 was renamed Apollo 1 (during the actual tests of Apollo 1, it was known as AS-204) Muller skipped out on Apollo 2 and 3 however, as these were the AS-201, AS-202, and AS-203 missions which had flown before Apollo 1.

In the days leading up to the launch, quite a few VIPs swarmed to the KSC, NASA executives, major figures from the industry as well as congressional leaders were all also attending the launch, each NASA center had a list for the VIPs, however, it was also allowed for the director of each center to invite guest personally. Apollo 4, being the first flight of the largest and heaviest rocket ever made, had gained quite a massive amount of media coverage, there were press areas near the pad for media coverage of the rollout and photo taking. This was broadcasted all over national television, and many were excited to see the launch, to say the least. The public interest in space was rising rapidly, despite the incident which happened during Apollo 1, this benefited NASA and their budget greatly, and will hopefully aid in speeding up the race to the moon, and the race to meet Kennedy’s deadline.

wX-ZGCJXtSTYGv99cD4kHGXgFDWdiQXNiUoUcF3eet0P_Fs6MHxlYRyyNYbCkZTT0KhbY-TI2xNd0VqJtEqgqYRs-yAlExitozwSCtPKen_w6WuNlhvyAQjor7_NqJK2dlCOy6F27JFseeHQRUvJ25PJPyfDkrV7yyuMIxqTsc6zE8tuJlsqISV3bA

Launch as it was seen from the LCC

And so the countdown comes to an end, the roar of the massive F1 engines is heard and the massive machine comes to life. The 56-and-a-half-hour countdown began with propellant loading and finished when the F-1 engines were at full power at 7:30 am EST on the 25th of September 1967. The sound sent quite a tremendous amount of rumble through the entire KSC, so much so that dust fell from the ceiling of the Launch Control Center even though 39A was 3 miles away from the LCC. People compared the sound of the F1 engines to the explosion, such as Dr. William Donn who described it as sounding like the biggest explosion ever produced. CBS's commentator, Walter Cronkite, and producer Jeff Gralnick put their hands on their trailer's observation window to stop it from shattering as ceiling tiles fell from above. Cronkite found Apollo 4 to be the most frightening space mission he covered.

Our building's shaking! The roar is terrific! The building's shaking! This big glass window is shaking. We're holding it with our hands! Look at that rocket go! Into the clouds at 3,000 feet! The roar is terrific! Look at it going! You can see it. Part of our roof has come in here.
Walter Cronkite, September 25th, 1967​


This flight ended up with the S-IVB and the CSM in a 190km, nearly circular, parking orbit, the same kind of parking orbit which will be used by future manned missions to the moon, the next step is the TLI, or trans-lunar injection, which is performed after 2 orbits, placing the spacecraft into an elliptical orbit of just over 17,000 kilometers at its highest point and its lowest point dipping into the atmosphere, ensuring that the S-IVB stage gets burnt up as it re-enters the earth’s atmosphere. Just after passing the point of apogee the CSM engine ignites to speed up the CSM to a lunar return speed, 11.1km/s to be exact. The re-entry altitude will be 120 kilometers and an angle of -6.93 degrees. After its very toasty re-entry, the CM landed 8.6 nautical miles from its target landing site in the north pacific, it was recovered by USS Bennington which saw its descent down to earth, the vessel managed to grab a couple of photos of the spacecraft as it descended to earth under its parachutes. The ship recovered it within two hours along with one of its parachutes. The spacecraft was taken to Downey California, North American’s facility, for post-flight analysis. In conclusion, during this test flight, all of the equipment performed well, with slight overperformance in the 3 stages, however within tolerance, the new environmental system kept the temperature inside the command module at comfortable pressure and temperature during the flight, and the temperature only increased slightly during re-entry, by 5.6 degrees. The feedback of the public confirmed that confidence in the success of the Apollo program has increased, not only with the public but of course within NASA. This test flight was a great show of success by NASA and President Lyndon B Johnson, who was one of the attendees of this historical test flight.

"The whole world could see the awesome sight of the first launch of what is now the largest rocket ever flown. This launching symbolizes the power this nation is harnessing for the peaceful exploration of space."
-Lyndon B Johnson, 36th President of the United States of America
September 26th, 1967
From Raptor
This concludes the second post in the series, and as always I'm open to any advice/corrections for the readers, Otherwise, thank you for reading.
 
Last edited:
this is gr8 m8 no h8

Maybe LM-1 can fly before years end if there aren’t too many delays.
 
Last edited:
Just so we're clear what caused NASA to change their mind over the issues with the Mercury (accidentally blown hatch on one mission and an indication of a failed hatch seal on another) and Gemini (hatches were difficult to close and seal once opened and the hatch seals themselves had lots of issues) that OTL drove the change in the Apollo hatch design? More specifically they rejected a 'blowable' hatch because of the capsule aeroshield over the Apollo during launch which would not allow such a design to function.

OTL when they redesigned the hatch it still didn't have the ability to 'blow' only to be opened from the inside, and instead of opening to the inside it now opened enough to also access the shroud hatch.

Good stuff and good writing I'm just wondering what drove the decision

Randy
 
Just so we're clear what caused NASA to change their mind over the issues with the Mercury (accidentally blown hatch on one mission and an indication of a failed hatch seal on another) and Gemini (hatches were difficult to close and seal once opened and the hatch seals themselves had lots of issues) that OTL drove the change in the Apollo hatch design? More specifically they rejected a 'blowable' hatch because of the capsule aeroshield over the Apollo during launch which would not allow such a design to function.

OTL when they redesigned the hatch it still didn't have the ability to 'blow' only to be opened from the inside, and instead of opening to the inside it now opened enough to also access the shroud hatch.

Good stuff and good writing I'm just wondering what drove the decision

Randy
It's a thing I haven't really taken any time to think about, as I'm not all the educated on pre Apollo missions, so I will look into this and try give you a good, technical, answer for now the only way I can answer you is that NASA engineers wanted to tend to the concerns of crew for their own safety. I assume there are some irl technical restraints to make this impossible, but I'll come up with a way to explain it.
 
Just so we're clear what caused NASA to change their mind over the issues with the Mercury (accidentally blown hatch on one mission and an indication of a failed hatch seal on another) and Gemini (hatches were difficult to close and seal once opened and the hatch seals themselves had lots of issues) that OTL drove the change in the Apollo hatch design? More specifically they rejected a 'blowable' hatch because of the capsule aeroshield over the Apollo during launch which would not allow such a design to function.

OTL when they redesigned the hatch it still didn't have the ability to 'blow' only to be opened from the inside, and instead of opening to the inside it now opened enough to also access the shroud hatch.

Good stuff and good writing I'm just wondering what drove the decision

Randy
Maybe you could help me out here too, would it be a possibility that the hatch on the aerocone could be blown off along side the hatch on the command module?
 
It's a thing I haven't really taken any time to think about, as I'm not all the educated on pre Apollo missions, so I will look into this and try give you a good, technical, answer for now the only way I can answer you is that NASA engineers wanted to tend to the concerns of crew for their own safety. I assume there are some irl technical restraints to make this impossible, but I'll come up with a way to explain it.

To put it in context the Mercury hatch was set up to be blown 'just in case' and in the case of Gus Grissom it did just that by accident but the capsule was so cramped that in training the astronauts routinely 'bumped' the hatch jettison button. (Part of Gus's "defense" was he had a major bruise from the button 'kick-back' mechanism which you didn't get from actually hitting the button properly)

Gemini hatches were set to be 'blown' only when the ejection sequence was initiated, (one of the things the pilots insisted on was the the ejection sequence could NOT continue until AFTER the hatches were blown as they were all familiar with far to many cases of "death by canopy not getting out of the way" ejections) Once on-orbit they 'pinned' the ejection system to 'safe' it for operations and would then remove the pins for reentry to 're-arm' the system. HOWEVER the hatches were made to be opened on-orbit but this never worked well as once opened they tended to be hard to close and secure again leading to a LOT of questions if they would survive reentry without ripping off, prematurely blow on the way down, or not hold atmosphere and leak the cabin down to vacuum.

The initial Apollo hatch was designed to 'address' all these concerns being a non-explosive hatch that opened inward rather than outward (hence the issue with getting it open in cases when the interior pressure was higher than outside) and was able to be secured to preserve the interior pressure under any circumstances. (The aeroshell hatch was a simple non-pressurized hatch that IF you have a blowable hatch would simply be carried away by the exploding hatch, but it begs the question of why you need an 'exploding' hatch in the first place. OTL the 'fix' was to make the hatch easier to open and to open outward but it was never a pyrotechnic "blowable" hatch)

My personal idea would be to have the original hatch 'jam' during testing with some VIP's visiting at the NAA plant (especially if the VIP's are the ones 'stuck' in the capsule till they can get the door open :) ) and to embarrass NASA and NAA into redesigning the hatch for reasons OTHER than the fire and that being able to open the hatch DURING the fire proves out the design. Of course the entire thing is going to still get Congress and everyone in an uproar over how many corners in other areas that NASA was having to cut to meet the deadlines but that's something that's going to happen anyway.

Randy
 
To put it in context the Mercury hatch was set up to be blown 'just in case' and in the case of Gus Grissom it did just that by accident but the capsule was so cramped that in training the astronauts routinely 'bumped' the hatch jettison button. (Part of Gus's "defense" was he had a major bruise from the button 'kick-back' mechanism which you didn't get from actually hitting the button properly)

Gemini hatches were set to be 'blown' only when the ejection sequence was initiated, (one of the things the pilots insisted on was the the ejection sequence could NOT continue until AFTER the hatches were blown as they were all familiar with far to many cases of "death by canopy not getting out of the way" ejections) Once on-orbit they 'pinned' the ejection system to 'safe' it for operations and would then remove the pins for reentry to 're-arm' the system. HOWEVER the hatches were made to be opened on-orbit but this never worked well as once opened they tended to be hard to close and secure again leading to a LOT of questions if they would survive reentry without ripping off, prematurely blow on the way down, or not hold atmosphere and leak the cabin down to vacuum.

The initial Apollo hatch was designed to 'address' all these concerns being a non-explosive hatch that opened inward rather than outward (hence the issue with getting it open in cases when the interior pressure was higher than outside) and was able to be secured to preserve the interior pressure under any circumstances. (The aeroshell hatch was a simple non-pressurized hatch that IF you have a blowable hatch would simply be carried away by the exploding hatch, but it begs the question of why you need an 'exploding' hatch in the first place. OTL the 'fix' was to make the hatch easier to open and to open outward but it was never a pyrotechnic "blowable" hatch)

My personal idea would be to have the original hatch 'jam' during testing with some VIP's visiting at the NAA plant (especially if the VIP's are the ones 'stuck' in the capsule till they can get the door open :) ) and to embarrass NASA and NAA into redesigning the hatch for reasons OTHER than the fire and that being able to open the hatch DURING the fire proves out the design. Of course the entire thing is going to still get Congress and everyone in an uproar over how many corners in other areas that NASA was having to cut to meet the deadlines but that's something that's going to happen anyway.

Randy
I see, so what I've done here is I only had the hatch be blowable for the Apollo Block I command module, however of course there is no point having a blow hatch on the block II since the hatch on the block II was made to be opened in like 5 seconds in case of an emergency. But back to the block I, in theory it would be possible to install a blow hatch if it was done correctly, considering that NASA had troubles with it before it would make sense that they would address the issues and subsequently be able to install a actually decent hatch design on the block I for safety reasons. For the sake of fun, let's assume that NASA engineers installed a good blow hatch on the command module, there's in theory nothing preventing them from doing so right? Although your idea does seem really good and quite original.

Thinking about it now though, considering the fact that the hatch was designed to be opened inwards the idea of having a blow hatch would require a alternative design to the block I, that differs from OTL, maybe a hatch that was supposed to open outwards but still was difficult to open?
 
I see, so what I've done here is I only had the hatch be blowable for the Apollo Block I command module, however of course there is no point having a blow hatch on the block II since the hatch on the block II was made to be opened in like 5 seconds in case of an emergency.

The Block II hatch was designed after the fire BECAUSE you couldn't get it open in a timely manner. If you're going to have it 'blowable' then it will likely stay that way. My "take" here would be they need to fix it from the start or you leave it alone since it 'works' as advertised.

But back to the block I, in theory it would be possible to install a blow hatch if it was done correctly, considering that NASA had troubles with it before it would make sense that they would address the issues and subsequently be able to install a actually decent hatch design on the block I for safety reasons. For the sake of fun, let's assume that NASA engineers installed a good blow hatch on the command module, there's in theory nothing preventing them from doing so right? Although your idea does seem really good and quite original.

Nothing really wrong or difficult about them building it "right" the first time but keep in mind they though they WERE doing so :)
I'm glad you liked the idea :)

Thinking about it now though, considering the fact that the hatch was designed to be opened inwards the idea of having a blow hatch would require a alternative design to the block I, that differs from OTL, maybe a hatch that was supposed to open outwards but still was difficult to open?

Again this was all because of the previous issues and while it looked good on paper....

Keep in mind that aircraft hatches tend to have a similar design so it's harder to open them when there is a pressure difference. This was because of the Gemini hatch issues, much like taking out the ability to 'blow' the hatch stemmed from Mercury. In general what they wanted was something that would fix all these issues with 'rapid opening' being almost no where on the list. Yes i think that having several issues during construction showing the short falls in more detail would help but keep in mind there's the whole "time pressure" issues that drove most of the compromises of the CM in the first place.

Randy
 
Hey guys! Very sorry for the fact that I haven't posted anything in a while, I've been quite busy with college work and my actual job. I'm hoping to have a post out by this Thursday which will be set in a few days before Apollo 10 and will reveal most of the "behind the scenes" stuff from my alternate history, this one should be exciting. Stay tuned for what's coming next!
 
While I'm waiting for a 3D render to be done for the series, here are a few spoilers for what I have planned in the series very soon:
screenshot8.png


screenshot0.png


screenshot6.png


screenshot3.png
 
Last edited:
Top