Return of Horrible Educational Maps

Well, that map is notably picky in that regard. France and Italy are choked full with them, The British isles, Germany and the alpine nations got at least a bunch, but in Eastern Europe, The Balkans™ and Iberia they are weirdly scarce.
Although given the placement of the words on the map it might be that they are printed in the lower part of Spain not visible in that photo (but tbh I doubt that)

In the meantime have a crunchyroll


View attachment 631006


(well, it's obvious that they usually do anime, not maps, and now we also know why)
I counted about 5 cities that are reasonably close to where they should be... well, give or take a couple hundred miles :)
 
This is a rather sad example for this thread.

They started so well but when they came to the Eastern Mediterranean...

badwall.jpg
 
in 1936 (probably before the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War) the Canadian Star Weekly Magazine was correct in predicting an Italian-British conflict in the Mediterranean.

Too bad that the map depiction wasn't as crisp as the conflict prediction...

badstarweekly3677a.jpg


Especially ironic: the scale they added onto that map. Without it one could have assumed that it would be just a stylized map of the Med, so that you get who is involved and such, with some distorted proportions to highlight points of interest (they oversized and labeled Elba, so there is some merit to that idea) but the scale ruined it all.
 
I love the precision of the scale, 126 and 2/13ths of a mile to the inch. Particularly given how they have drawn everything else.
 
in 1936 (probably before the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War) the Canadian Star Weekly Magazine was correct in predicting an Italian-British conflict in the Mediterranean.

Too bad that the map depiction wasn't as crisp as the conflict prediction...

View attachment 632154

Especially ironic: the scale they added onto that map. Without it one could have assumed that it would be just a stylized map of the Med, so that you get who is involved and such, with some distorted proportions to highlight points of interest (they oversized and labeled Elba, so there is some merit to that idea) but the scale ruined it all.
My favorite is that the country just north of the Austrian/Swiss border is Yellow, the color of *France*. World War II might have been a bit different if France controlled the entire northern border of Switzerland :)
 
in 1936 (probably before the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War) the Canadian Star Weekly Magazine was correct in predicting an Italian-British conflict in the Mediterranean.

Too bad that the map depiction wasn't as crisp as the conflict prediction...

View attachment 632154

Especially ironic: the scale they added onto that map. Without it one could have assumed that it would be just a stylized map of the Med, so that you get who is involved and such, with some distorted proportions to highlight points of interest (they oversized and labeled Elba, so there is some merit to that idea) but the scale ruined it all.
The Romanian/Bulgarian border is quite interesting... and quite inexplicable as they drew the Danube fairly accurately... so they had the correct border right there, but chose not to use it... artistic license I suppose :p
 
Well, have here a bigger map. While nowadays we have Holstein Cows there apparently one were Holstein War Elephants, not to mention the War Elephants of England and Wales...

View attachment 632740
“Oh, the Roman Empire used war elephants? Okay. That must mean they used war elephants EVERYWHERE in the empire, so I’ll just color in the whole empire.”

It’s like coloring in all of New Jersey on a map of where you’ve been when you had a layover in Newark once.
 
“Oh, the Roman Empire used war elephants? Okay. That must mean they used war elephants EVERYWHERE in the empire, so I’ll just color in the whole empire.”

It’s like coloring in all of New Jersey on a map of where you’ve been when you had a layover in Newark once.

Could have been except for the fact that they missed the entire Danube border of the Roman Empire (and given how they spill into Denmark they weren't notably precise along the Rhine border either...)
 
Well, have here a bigger map. While nowadays we have Holstein Cows there apparently one were Holstein War Elephants, not to mention the War Elephants of England and Wales...

View attachment 632740
“Oh, the Roman Empire used war elephants? Okay. That must mean they used war elephants EVERYWHERE in the empire, so I’ll just color in the whole empire.”

It’s like coloring in all of New Jersey on a map of where you’ve been when you had a layover in Newark once.
Could have been except for the fact that they missed the entire Danube border of the Roman Empire (and given how they spill into Denmark they weren't notably precise along the Rhine border either...)
I've seen the Reddit thread that this map is taken from and the covering of the Roman Empire and Denmark refers to two things. Firstly, the Romans did ship elephants across the Empire, most famously Claudius used some in the invasion of Britain. Second, the 'spillover' to Denmark refers to an elephant that Charlemagne was given as a gift and used on campaign in the region.
 
“Oh, the Roman Empire used war elephants? Okay. That must mean they used war elephants EVERYWHERE in the empire, so I’ll just color in the whole empire.”

It’s like coloring in all of New Jersey on a map of where you’ve been when you had a layover in Newark once.
The Roman Empire neither even included Holstein, I don't know what that is supposed to be. The red in Macedonia might be that one though, but I think you should restrict the yellow in Western Europe to the parts of the Carthago empire and Italia. The yellow in Arabia might be correct for the campaign to Mecca?

edit: thanks Gwrtheyrn Annwn
 
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Second, the 'spillover' to Denmark refers to an elephant that Charlemagne was given as a gift and used on campaign in the region.

Then again there are no historical sources stating that the elephant was used there as a war elephant, so coloring it yellow is a rather generous interpretation.
 
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