References: Prototypes, transitional and ephemeral uniforms

As the name say, I thought it might be interesting considering the nature of this forum if people could post images or links to prototypes, transitional and ephemeral uniforms. In other words, uniforms which, for one reason or another, never became widely adopted by an organisation in OTL.

To get the ball rolling here is an image of the USAF "McPeak's Uniform" worn by its originator issued briefly between 1990 and 1994 before being scrapped upon his retirement. the main difference is a more "business suit" cut and sleeves rings instead of the usual US military ranks. Apparently, officers felt they looked like commercial pilots.

 
I believe I have seen this come up elsewhere but here goes. For a time after the Frano-Prussian War, it seems there was brief fad among American Army units to adopt more Prussian style helmets and such like. I don't know how widespread the practice was but I think this picture fits with the thread.

american_spike_big1.jpg
 
WWI prototype helmets. Some of them actually evolved into the designs we know, or variations of them. The Stahlhem-like American models make me think of TL 191. :D The visored sallet-like helmets look feverishly anachronistic. Medieval dieselpunk, anyone ? :cool:

Prilby prvej svetovej vojny prototypy.jpg
 
I believe I have seen this come up elsewhere but here goes. For a time after the Frano-Prussian War, it seems there was brief fad among American Army units to adopt more Prussian style helmets and such like. I don't know how widespread the practice was but I think this picture fits with the thread.
Someone showed me this website, which has got a lot of pictures of historical US uniforms, including ones from the 1880s when they adopted pickelhaube-style helmets.





 
The French soldier (and painter) Louis Guingot creates the first camouflage uniforms that are produced by "Magasins Réunis" in Nancy. Apparently only 5 were produced - the pattern was called "Léopard

camoufl.jpg

camoufl.jpg
 
I wonder what brought this on. At the time it was mostly thrench warfare so there wouldn't have been any real need for that sort of things on the part of the french. Maybe it was more of an intelectual exercise on his part.


Quote from the Patriot files

''After the initial months of mobile warfare, the lines stabilized and the war in the trenches started. The terrible debacle had shown that the old uniform was obsolete, not least the garish colouring, and in 1915 it was replaced by the new in horizon-blue cloth. The horrible winter of 1914-15, and the gradual introduction of the new horizon blue uniforms in the spring of 1915 meant that the French Army at first in this period appeared very motley when it came to uniform. First during the second half of 1915 this gave way and a sort of standardisation could be seen.''
 
proposal for Most Senior US General rank insignias

Taken from wikipedia:

- World War 1



On 3 September 1919, President Woodrow Wilson, in accordance with Public Law 66-45, promoted Pershing to the rank of "General of the Armies of the United States"[5][6] in recognition of Pershing's performance as commander of the American Expeditionary Forces. The peculiar wording of Pershing's new rank (i.e. "of the Armies") was to distinguish that this held authority over all armed services, as opposed to the Civil War title "General of the Army" (itself an Army rank).

General Pershing was authorized to create his own insignia. He chose to wsear the four stars of a general, but in gold. However, Army regulations of the time did not recognize this insignia, and Pershing's gold stars were never authorized as an official insignia.[7]

- World War 2



It became obvious that the Supreme Commander for the attack of Japan would hold an enormous amount of power and would command an invasion force larger than any seen to date in the Second World War. It was also clear that whoever this commander was would have direct command authority of not one, but several five-star officers. To that end, a proposal was discussed in the War Department to appoint Douglas MacArthur to the rank of "General of the Armies" and have this position be considered a six-star general rank.


The proposal for MacArthur's promotion to a new rank was begun on 23 July 1945.[10] The Army draft for the promotion specified three key points regarding the renewed proposal for General of the Armies:
  1. The position would clearly be a six-star general rank
  2. The rank would be senior to General of the Army
  3. The rank would require a new insignia which incorporated a sixth star into the five-star design of General of the Army.
The Institute of Heraldry produced a single sketch of how the insignia for six-star rank would appear, which was later filed into Douglas MacArthur's service record.[11]

The proposal for MacArthur's promotion was dropped by the United States Army on 18 August 1945, four days after Japan's surrender announcement rendered the planned invasion moot. MacArthur's service record indicates the promotion package was closed due to "lack of necessity for such a rank".
 
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