Reds! Official Fanfiction Thread (Part Two)

the weed and the sex number
Ohh..

I did guess that, but I thought the joke was too obvious. Besides ITTL 420 wouldn't really exist since weed since the drug war ITTL doesn't really happen.

So based off the question, my assertion is that ITTL Simpsons is a lot more raunchy then OTL Simpsons.
 
Reactor 420-69
....Oh my God that's delightful.

Premier of the United Republics (ending with the nuking of London, and nuclear war imminent in the final episode).
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I suspect content like this could still make it to viewing in a non-detente period but in an entirely different tone?

Also, that's what they call Blu-Ray huh, BVCD?
 
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I suspect content like this could still make it to viewing in a non-detente period but in an entirely different tone?
In a period when the powers that be are pro-war, that bit of satire (in which a buffoon could come to power and destroy the world) might not be...welcome on the air-waves.
 
SunSurge(2018) (By Rise Comics)

SunSurge(2018 film)



SunSurge is a 2018 sci-fi animated film directed by director Uwe Boll, starring an ensemble cast of Narito Rabara, Michelle Rodriguez, Malik Jones, Ami Mizuno, Minako Aino, and Corey Burton, featuring a score from Veronica Cheng.


A joint production by Hyperion and Toei, and inspired by the Indra Seven episode Three Days, SunSurge won the awards for best picture, best animated feature, and best Sci-fi feature, along with a best actor win shared amongst the main cast.


Plot


In the year 2122, due to the presence of a q-ball particle, the Sun had started to contract, causing the Earth to start freezing. In a desperate attempt to prevent a new Ice Age, the United Nations assembles a motley crew of scientists and engineers on a secret, potentially deadly mission to jumpstart the sun by blasting it with radiation, destroying the q-ball. The team is led by Professor Awan (Narito Rabara), a brilliant yet troubled nuclear engineer haunted by memories of war. Accompanied by astronaut Camila Vasquez (Michelle Rodriguez), former bomber pilot Yuna Tamagusuku (Ami Mizuno), navigator Peter Johnson (Corey Burton) and engineer Aaden Smith (Malik Jones), the team sets aboard the Invictus on their mission to detonate a hydrogen bomb in the Sun’s atmosphere.


As the Invictus slingshots past Mercury, the solar shields get damaged by space debris. To fix the solar shields, Camila and Aaden volunteered to go on a spacewalk, with assistance from Tamagusuku and Awan. As the shiends are repaired and realigned, the origin of the space debris is revealed. The debris is shown to have come from another ship, the Indra, which had attempted a similar mission a decade prior, only to fail for unknown reasons. Reasoning that two bombs are better than one, Awan decides to commandeer the Indra to use its bomb as well as the one on the Invictus.


As the Invictus docks with the Indra, Camila, Aaden, Yuna, and Awan go through the airlock, only to discover that the Indra’s mainframe had been sabotaged, making bomb delivery impossible. Searching through the Indra, Awan and Aaden come across a series of logs made by the Indra’s captain, Kobayashi, which mentions the deaths of the crew from intense radiation. At the same time, Camila and Yuna come across the bodies of the crew in the solar room, with wounds that didn’t match up with what the logs said, triggering Camila’s PTSD, manifesting as a flashback to a failed rescue involving getting locked on the other side of an airlock.


Making their way back onto the Invictus, the airlock connecting both ships is sabotaged. In a spur-of-the-moment act, Camila kisses Yuna before shutting the airlock and detaching it from the Indra, leaving Vasquez to die in space.


With four crew members remaining, they decide what to do next. The plan later settles on shoving the Indra into the sun, before dropping its own bomb into the sun, where both bombs will explode. The problem is that the Indra’s thrusters are damaged beyond repair, so the Icarus has to pull the crippled Indra with it to make the plan work. Using the Invictus’ robot arm, Aaron holds onto the Indra as the way downIcarus makes its way to where the Invictus will drop the bombs into the Sun.


Suddenly, an explosion is heard, damaging the ship’s oxygen garden. Consulting the ship’s computer, the crew learn that the crew only have enough oxygen for four people to get to the sun, and that there is a fifth person on board. Splitting up, the crew try to find where the stowaway is, only for Yuna to find Aaden’s body, with a knife wound to the neck.


In the cockpit, Johnson radios the crew about the stowaway, managing to hold them off long enough for backup to arrive, but not before the stowaway damages the mainframe, disabling the autopilot and bomb controls. Awan and Yuna both arrive, to fend off the stowaway, who reveals herself to be a heavily scarred Kobayashi(Minako Aino). Kobayashi rants about the futility of the mission, the ineffectiveness of the bombs, and how she will save the world from mutually assured destruction, before launching herself at Awan. Johnson punches Kobayashi off of Awan, before he makes his way to the arm, and Awan to the bomb bay.


Kobayashi fights Johnson, who manages to release the Indra in time before Kobayashi stabs him in the neck, in the same place she stabbed Aaden. Making her way down, Kobayashi tries to confront Awan once more, only to be rebuked before Awan activates the manual bomb controls, sending both her and the bomb hurtling into the Sun. Seeing the ship turn, Kobayashi tries to go back to the cockpit via the lift, only to get kicked by Yuna. After a fight that leads into the observation room, Yuna strikes a debilitating blow against Kobayashi. In her dying breath, Kobayashi notes that the sun is dancing, as animation of a large solar flare plays to a now iconic piece by Veronica Cheng. In an ice covered Tokyo, Yuna’s wife looks up at the sun, as the sky starts turning blue.


Cast


Narito Rabara as Professor Awan, the leader of the Invictus crew and creator of the Hydrogen Bomb. Rabara described Awan as a Kirk-esque character: charismatic, but with her own demons and crippling guilt. Rabara consulted with multiple scientists, including fellow co-star Ami Mizuno, on how to properly portray a physician, as well as learning about Astrophysics, Astronomy, and Nuclear physics. Combining this with Rabara’s own extensive research on how people deal with guilt aided in Rabara’s most critically acclaimed performance of her career.


Michelle Rodriguez as Camilla Vasquez, a veteran astronaut and former Red Army combat engineer. Rodriguez’s portrayal of Vasquez as a veteran haunted by her actions in the past was informed by Rodriguez’s experiences in the Mexican Red Army, especially her involvement in the Phillipine Civil War in the 90s. This resulted in a compelling performance, which led to her best actor, shared with her co-stars


Ami Mizuno as Yuna Tamagusuku, a former bomber pilot and sole survivor of the Invictus crew. According to both Boll and Mizuno, Yuna’s arc is one of Break the Heart, aided by Mizuno’s own performance. This was also Mizuno’s debut as a lead actor, having previously cameoed in several other films as a minor character. This led to her win for best debut performance.


Malik Jones as Aaden Smith, the Invictus’ engineer. Playing against type, Malik played an engineer who could stay calm under pressure. According to Boll, most of his dialogue was ad-libbed, creating a memorable and funny character.


Corey Burton as Peter Johnson, the navigator of the Invictus. According to Burton, Boll wrote this role specifically for him, especially after watching his role in Super Galaxia 2. Initially, Burton wasn’t interested in the film, until a prototype clip was sent to him, synched to a demo tape by Veronica Cheng.


Minor cameos include Makoto Kino as Yuna’s wife, and Uwe Boll and Veronica Cheng’s as part of the dead crew.


Production

Origins


Uwe Boll was inspired by a comic he wrote as a child, inspired by the Indra 7 episode, Three Days.


-"SunSurge is special to me because it's based off a little comic book I wrote when I was 13. It was inspired by "Three Days", the Indra 7 episode where the crew has three days to stop a star from going supernova and destroying an entire galaxy. I showed it to my daughter Sophia and she said 'why don't you make this into a movie? This is awesome!' So even if it's not like my other films, I'm still putting a lot of myself into it."


The decision to make the film animated also stemmed from his comic, and his desire to bring it to life.


-"It's an animated film because I could never see my old drawings as anything but drawings! Animation is such an interesting medium. It's hard work, much harder than my usual production style, and there's completely different rules about what you can and can't do compared to working in live action. But it also gave us so much more freedom than working in live-action does. Sometimes I felt overwhelmed by just how much stuff me and the Hyperion and Toei staff had control over!"


During his stay in Miami, Boll heard Veronica Cheng performing at the Hammer nightclub. Inspired by that, he contacted Cheng to produce the soundtrack, who agreed to do it.


- “You could say that I was at least somewhat inspired by the old Hyperion shorts to sync music with the visuals. I wanted to do that, but with modern music! That, and Indra 7 was the first to have an electronic soundtrack, because why not? Besides, Cheng was really helpful, even ad-libbing the one line that became The line to repeat!”


Production


SunSurge was a joint production between the UASR’s Hyperion and Japan’s Toei, bringing with them some of the most talented animators on board. The comic book art style was requested by Boll, achieved through cel-shading and high contrast. Motion capture was used to give a more fluid motion to the characters, and a robot arm mockup from the Buran shuttle was motion captured for the film. The animators, voice actors, and composer all worked together to keep everything synced together. Production on the film took two years, with the voice actors doing motion capture for their characters.


Design


Boll heavily consulted with engineers and designers when making the ships seen in SunSurge, down to how two ships may dock. Apart from that, many elements had a zeerust vibe to them, mostly due to the 90s nostalgia at the time of production. One element that interested moviegoers was the oxygen garden, which was a proposed way of generating oxygen.


Music

Main article: Music of SunSurge


The biggest part of the film was the score. From beginning to end, the entire film was synced to the score. Made by Veronica Cheng, it is a synthwave score with 20 tracks, influenced by the scores of Star Trek and Indra 7.


Release and Reception


SunSurge opened in 280 theaters around the world, bringing in the equivalent of £12 million over its opening week in the AFS. Immediately after its opening week, the film was made available online on Peertube, with another version featuring commentary from Boll, Cheng, and the main cast.


In the TCI, the film was praised for its visuals, the score, and the performances of the main cast.


Critic Yuri Kim praised the film as Boll’s finest work, praising its visuals and storytelling, but criticizes it for wasting a few of its most compelling characters in favor of a twist.


In the AFS, it recieved more of a mixed review, with critics both praising the visuals, and blanching at the horror aspects and criticizing the short kiss in the middle.


SunSurge was given an NC-17 rating for violence in the FBU and Cuba, but an edited version was featured, which featured less gore overall, giving it an R rating. In spite of that, it remained available for free online.


The film was nominated for best animated feature, best sci-fi feature, best visuals, and best picture, of which it only lost best visuals to Bienvedinos a Valencia. It also has the distinction of having a shared best actor win, necessitating the category of best cast to be made for next year’s awards.
 
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It was temporarily banned in Cuba, China, and the FBU for showing violence, but an edited version was featured, which featured less gore overall.
Hmm, wouldn't it just receive an NC-17 or equivalent ratings that just tank its earnings? Instead of outright bans.

Edit: especially in a less restrictive China ITTL, and in the FBU
 
Hmm, wouldn't it just receive an NC-17 or equivalent ratings that just tank its earnings? Instead of outright bans.

Edit: especially in a less restrictive China ITTL, and in the FBU
Is the rating system in Blue countries ITTL as murky and perverse as OTL? Are its members more mysterious then the Manhattan Project scientists, and their believes contradictory (we hate lesbians, but don't care about violence?)
 
Is the rating system in Blue countries ITTL as murky and perverse as OTL? Are its members more mysterious then the Manhattan Project scientists, and their believes contradictory (we hate lesbians, but don't care about violence?)
I do agree on some (like, say, Hashemite Arabia's rating org) would outright ban this movie because of LGBT+ content, and not even gracing it w/NC-17. Rhodesia's rating org would just ban it for being Made in Red-bloc.

To be fair, and to spare Rise Comics from potential further edits, those countries' rating org's bans not being mentioned in the article can still make sense because ITTL it would be routine for every movie w/similar content.
 
I do agree on some (like, say, Hashemite Arabia's rating org) would outright ban this movie because of LGBT+ content, and not even gracing it w/NC-17. Rhodesia's rating org would just ban it for being Made in Red-bloc.

To be fair, and to spare Rise Comics from potential further edits, those countries' rating org's bans not being mentioned in the article can still make sense because ITTL it would be routine for every movie w/similar content.
But I figure a lot of it might have a lot to do with politics: as you said, Rhodesia will have a "Red instant-ban" stamp in its film rating offices. The Blue nations might not be much better, although Red nations might also be quite willing to ban stuff as "counterrevolutionary".
 
Death of a Spaceman (By Mr.E)
So, yeah, I just decided to do a spoiler piece about a particular aspect that's of interest. Not much, but it gives a few details that have been revealed before. Anyway, let's get to it.

Tom Lawson, first man in space, dies at age 83

Guardian obituary, April 12th, 2011

"He really made the grade" - Bastille, David Jones

Family members confirmed Monday night that Sir Thomas Milner Lawson died peacefully in his sleep at age 83. Lawson, a decorated veteran of the Entente Air Force in the Horn of Africa War, was chosen among 5000 applicants to be the spationaut aboard the Bastille space capsule to become the first man in space. Against the rushed nature of the project (a response to the recent success of Sputnik 1), he not only reached the stars, but survived the reentry, in process etching his name in world history for eons.

The son of grocers in Birmingham, Lawson was interested in the stars and space, being an avid reader of Amazing Science Fiction. However, his interests soon went into airplanes, partially as a result of hearing of the heroism of World War II pilots, and at age 23, signed up with the Entente Air Force to join the fight against Communism in Africa.

He soon became something of an ace, eventually winning a Designated Flying Cross for stopping an American advance despite his Hawker Hunter having engine trouble. After the end of the war, he remained in the Entente Air Force, stationed in Nice and Djibouti, where he mostly acted as a test pilot for jet planes. It was while at the latter when he heard the news that Comintern had launched a tiny satellite, ostensibly part of a scientific project.

Sputnik 1 galvanized the Franco-British to start their own crash program, determined not to let their rivals rest on their laurels. The Joint Ministry of Space was soon established (an Office of Space in the UK; a Ministry of Space in France), with an eye towards establishing a viable Franco-British space program. When Comintern announced that they would follow-up Sputnik by launching a man into space, the FBU soon got to work developing a viable manned launch system. Based on the existing Blue Streak missile program, the Black Prince rocket launch system was developed, first for the first FBU satellite (Voyager in 1958), and eventually a new version of the rocket was created specifically for a manned capsule, named the Bastille, which could sustain an orbit, and reentry into Earth.

Lawson, invigorated by his childhood interest in space, decided to apply to be the first “spationaut”, along with more than 500 thousand applicants. Likely, his heroism and jet plane experience helped him get into the final class. Though, he was not chosen as the first man until late into the development of the program.

He had trepidation of being a trail-blazer, especially for a frontier as dangerous and unknown as space travel, but for the sake of country, kept a brave face, and trained diligently for the mission. David Isaacs, the back-up pilot, recalled Lawson’s dedication in his 1991 memoirs.

On March 3rd, 1960, Lawson boarded the Black Prince rocket at the newly built cosmodrome in Kourou, French Guiana, and settled into the capsule. At 10:01 AM GMT, the Black Prince launched and within 5 minutes, Lawson could see the upper atmosphere, communicating to mission control, “I can see the edge of the Earth. A bit of cloud cover.”

5 minutes later, he reached orbit, where he stayed for nearly an hour and a half. In his 1979 memoir, Blue Skies Above:


“People don’t realize that orbiting basically means falling and never hitting anything, and that’s really what the sensation of weightlessness is like. Like falling, but never reaching the ground. It honestly felt a bit odd, but also exhilarating, just floating around. The biggest thing I remember was looking down on the Earth. I could see the blueness of the ocean, the greens of the forest, the browns of the desert, and the lights of cities. It was all very vivid, the way photographs can’t capture. It was up there when it hit me that I was the first person to ever experience this view. To see the Earth as it existed.”

After 100 minutes in orbit, the capsule de-orbited, and began its descent back to Earth. Despite some worry due to a delay in transmission, the capsule successfully reached the Windward Passage, and was picked by the Americuban Navy, and Lawson would recover at the US Navy Base in Guantanamo Bay.

News of the flight quickly spread worldwide, plastered on every paper in the world. Lawson was awarded the Legion d’honneur and knighted in short succession. He also toured the world as part of a propaganda campaign. More importantly, Comintern was shocked that the FBU (which intelligence reports had indicated was behind on rocketry) could pull off such a scheme, and accelerated their own space plans, sending astronaut Billie Guster* as the first Comintern astronaut in May of that year. They also announced the Luna program, to send an international team to the Moon to begin the process of colonization. Not wanting to be outdone, the FBU also announced their own moon program, Artemis.

Lawson himself was ultimately tired from the experience of touring and promoting, as well as the extensive attention, though he ultimately did several more flights as part of the early Artemis test missions. Eventually, after the Joint Ministry was transformed into ESA, and other European nations began to take part, he retired back to Birmingham in 1967, where he remained in relative peace for several years.

Still, he had a ping of disappointment, he said, as he watched the Luna landing on May 25th, 1970, on the EBC. After a few more years out of the limelight, he (a self-proclaimed proud patriot and conservative) parlayed his success into a parliamentary run for Birmingham Yardley. He won with large margins, but after a mediocre term, he was ultimately unseated in 1979. (The tagline for Labour opponent Syd Tierney was “What on Earth has he done lately?”)

Despite his relative lack of action, he was instrumental in the formation of the PEOPLE faction of the People’s Alliance. His environmentalism had stemmed from seeing the Earth from space and contrasting it with the bleakness of space. He made a speech to this effect, stating that he had seen the fragility of Earth from orbit, and that people ought to preserve the only bit of nature known in the universe.

And as the ambitious Artemis mission was scaled back to just a lunar base and further manned exploration plans scuttled, Lawson was soon drawn into the growing advocacy for space exploration. Especially as the wars of the 80’s subsided, Lawson began to heavily promote the idea of Mars mission in collaboration with Comintern, a means of international cooperation after intense hostility. The Neo-Detente gave Lawson a chance to meet some of his American counterparts, and in 1988, he, along with Freeman Dyson, Carl Sagan, and Robert Truax, were involved in the “Together to Mars” Spacebridge conference. It is believed this advocacy lead to the announcement the following year of the international Mars mission.

Because of this advocacy, a “long overdue olive branch”, as Premier Davis put it, was granted in 1991, as planning for the mission began in earnest, when proud conservative Lawson was awarded the Order of the Red Banner of Labor in DeLeon-Debs for “his outstanding achievement in the field of space science and space exploration” (Lawson included a jab at Tierney in his speech). He was also in attendance during the Mars launch in 1996, sitting with first person on the moon Strike Jorgenson.

Lawson would serve on the board of the Anglo-French Interplanetary Society, but largely lived in peace and isolation on his Birmingham farm.

He is survived by wife Laskhmi, their three children and five grandchilden, his brother Jerry and his children.

--------------------

So, there's that. I'll fix any technical details about the flight I might've gotten wrong.
 
Tom Lawson, first man in space, dies at age 83
This is great! I think some of the names of missions could use a little political touch up, though.

Bastille, when the FBU is fighting against a revolutionary regime and in fact has a monarch?

Black Prince, when he was a distinguished commander... In fighting the French?

I think the FBU would be a little bit more diplomatic about the other part of the union.
 
This is great! I think some of the names of missions could use a little political touch up, though.

Bastille, when the FBU is fighting against a revolutionary regime and in fact has a monarch?

Black Prince, when he was a distinguished commander... In fighting the French?

I think the FBU would be a little bit more diplomatic about the other part of the union.
Yeah, my bad. I didn't consider the implications through.

Black Prince was the name of a cancelled series of British launch vehicles OTL, so I just appropriated the name.
 
What is known/has been revealed about post-WW2 ITTL countries & country borders?

IIRC:
  1. Among ITTL immediate post-war socialist countries are Warsaw pact nations, East Austria (tho it was mentioned America is willing to unify Austria partially or wholly with GDR, linking them with the Sudetenland), Socialist Republic of Italy (roughly 1946 Italian election map + some Northeastern partl), 2nd Spanish Republic (Basque Country + Catalonia), Turkey, Iran, united China, united Korea, Japan. Possibly Western Sahara & the Rif (North Morocco)?
  2. Socialist Palestine (Labor Zionist + Arab/Muslim Socialists), Kurdistan, Congo, & Indochina achieves independence later. After the Horn of Africa War there's socialist Somaliland & Eritrea. South Africa (does lack of apartheid means Namibia is still part of it?) & Canada switch sides (the latter in the 80s Red Turn, avoiding WW3). Afghanistan is Red for a bit before it implodes.
  3. Non-leftist states include FBU (does it include Ireland? That's...Troubling), German Kingdom/Empire, Kingdom of Italy, Kingdom of Spain, GIC (united Indian subcontinent), Rhodesia-Nyasaland (Rhodesia w/possible addition of Oranje & Transvaal), most post-colonial countries (w/many having Canada/Australia style European head of states).

As of current TL iteration, are these plans still true?
 
Arab/Muslim Socialists
There was no active Muslim movement then (in any case, comparable to modern Islamism). By the way, at the expense of the Arabs - I had some bad thoughts. The fact is that the large "socialist" organizations of the Arabs - the same Ba'ath, put more emphasis on the "Arab". Of course, it is worth taking into account various trends within the organization, but historically, the countries where the Ba'ath took power or the Nasserites declared the state to be Arab, and minorities were subjected to various forms of oppression. Needless to say, in some cases they borrowed Nazi rhetoric? So here the Ba'ath must change a lot
 
What is known/has been revealed about post-WW2 ITTL countries & country borders?

IIRC:
  1. Among ITTL immediate post-war socialist countries are Warsaw pact nations, East Austria (tho it was mentioned America is willing to unify Austria partially or wholly with GDR, linking them with the Sudetenland), Socialist Republic of Italy (roughly 1946 Italian election map + some Northeastern partl), 2nd Spanish Republic (Basque Country + Catalonia), Turkey, Iran, united China, united Korea, Japan. Possibly Western Sahara & the Rif (North Morocco)?
  2. Socialist Palestine (Labor Zionist + Arab/Muslim Socialists), Kurdistan, Congo, & Indochina achieves independence later. After the Horn of Africa War there's socialist Somaliland & Eritrea. South Africa (does lack of apartheid means Namibia is still part of it?) & Canada switch sides (the latter in the 80s Red Turn, avoiding WW3). Afghanistan is Red for a bit before it implodes.
  3. Non-leftist states include FBU (does it include Ireland? That's...Troubling), German Kingdom/Empire, Kingdom of Italy, Kingdom of Spain, GIC (united Indian subcontinent), Rhodesia-Nyasaland (Rhodesia w/possible addition of Oranje & Transvaal), most post-colonial countries (w/many having Canada/Australia style European head of states).

As of current TL iteration, are these plans still true?
Mostly intact as of current plans. Around... 80% of listed here, I guess. There are some who are incorrect even from the antiquated version on this site. I think Afghanistan is never been Red to begin with. And you haven't mentioned the Latin American countries, many of which are Red, even in the antiquated version. Mexico. Nicaragua. Hispaniola. It's been revealed on this site's updates that Colombia, Peru, Argentina and the other South American "people's democracies" are going to be fully Red by the time of World War II. Liberia is also Red.

The Communist bloc of countries in the current plans are a bit larger now in territorial size (though not necessarily by population) than what AH.com has revealed in the past.
 

SpookyBoy

Banned
What is known/has been revealed about post-WW2 ITTL countries & country borders?

IIRC:
  1. Among ITTL immediate post-war socialist countries are Warsaw pact nations, East Austria (tho it was mentioned America is willing to unify Austria partially or wholly with GDR, linking them with the Sudetenland), Socialist Republic of Italy (roughly 1946 Italian election map + some Northeastern partl), 2nd Spanish Republic (Basque Country + Catalonia), Turkey, Iran, united China, united Korea, Japan. Possibly Western Sahara & the Rif (North Morocco)?
  2. Socialist Palestine (Labor Zionist + Arab/Muslim Socialists), Kurdistan, Congo, & Indochina achieves independence later. After the Horn of Africa War there's socialist Somaliland & Eritrea. South Africa (does lack of apartheid means Namibia is still part of it?) & Canada switch sides (the latter in the 80s Red Turn, avoiding WW3). Afghanistan is Red for a bit before it implodes.
  3. Non-leftist states include FBU (does it include Ireland? That's...Troubling), German Kingdom/Empire, Kingdom of Italy, Kingdom of Spain, GIC (united Indian subcontinent), Rhodesia-Nyasaland (Rhodesia w/possible addition of Oranje & Transvaal), most post-colonial countries (w/many having Canada/Australia style European head of states).

As of current TL iteration, are these plans still true?
Mostly intact as of current plans. Around... 80% of listed here, I guess. There are some who are incorrect even from the antiquated version on this site. I think Afghanistan is never been Red to begin with. And you haven't mentioned the Latin American countries, many of which are Red, even in the antiquated version. Mexico. Nicaragua. Hispaniola. It's been revealed on this site's updates that Colombia, Peru, Argentina and the other South American "people's democracies" are going to be fully Red by the time of World War II. Liberia is also Red.

The Communist bloc of countries in the current plans are a bit larger now in territorial size (though not necessarily by population) than what AH.com has revealed in the past.
Afghanistan is non-aligned, while Austria is split between both Germanies. South Africa still has apartheid before it goes red, and the UK has the same borders as OTL, while the IRA is more Marxist. South America is split between a restored monarchist Brazil and a few of its neighbours which stay Blue and the Red Latin American states, which are part of an EU-like alliance/bloc.
 
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