Railroad thread

Still, I'm thinking this world's E-L will be defined by electrification on its hillier sections and on flat sections long strings of double-stack containers, trailers on flat cars or spine cars, 86' merchandise boxcars and 75' refrigerator cars charging in both directions behind powerful diesel engines at major speed - 50-60 mph in more populated areas, 80 mph on flat farmlands and tracks through lots of cuts, tunnels and walled areas through cities, aiming to deliver goods from Boston and New York to Chicago as rapidly as possible.
Possibly St. Louis if I go through with the EL taking up the Nickel Plate, since the PRR getting the N&W and the Chessie system still forming leave me stumped about its fate.
 
@Lucas Is that 70s HST a gas turbine powered unit? I'm curious about the details and it's usage, as I had an idea for using a different-looking power car for the ATL Via Rail LRC, which IOTL used an Alco 251 diesel for power buy in my world used twin Pratt and Whitney Canada gas turbines and a small Detroit Diesel engine for hotel power and slow-speed moving.
These version as electric powered, but they is possible a version gas turbine too. If look closely they design is very similar to RTL Turboliner front Power cars.
 
There are 4ft 8.5 in versions of the design though.

I would particulary use more the models offer by Stadler as the FLIRT and KISS models, and the are still in use OTL on some routes for light commuter and Caltrain electrification project. These are built for both commuter and long distance services too, mainly the FLIRT units, as they are offer in diesel, electric and dual-mode.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stadler_FLIRT
 
Possibly St. Louis if I go through with the EL taking up the Nickel Plate, since the PRR getting the N&W and the Chessie system still forming leave me stumped about its fate.
That's a possibility, but what about a merger of the little players, perhaps? If the N&W gets sucked into the PRR (or perhaps the other way around, as we know which of the two had better management....), perhaps you put the Wabash and Wheeling and Lake Erie into the E-L and make then make the NKP figure out how to expand. (Merge with the Lehigh Valley to get a main line from Buffalo to New York, perhaps? That would also allow lots of anthracite coal traffic west from the LV's turf into the Midwest - perhaps get some utilities to try burning anthracite in their power plants?)
 
That's a possibility, but what about a merger of the little players, perhaps? If the N&W gets sucked into the PRR (or perhaps the other way around, as we know which of the two had better management....), perhaps you put the Wabash and Wheeling and Lake Erie into the E-L and make then make the NKP figure out how to expand. (Merge with the Lehigh Valley to get a main line from Buffalo to New York, perhaps? That would also allow lots of anthracite coal traffic west from the LV's turf into the Midwest - perhaps get some utilities to try burning anthracite in their power plants?)
I will admit to feeling that with a POD in the 1920s, it's likely that the Van Sweringen Roads will likely be a bit more closely connected. Even so, the W&LE would likely end up in the EL anyway if my original idea were to follow through.
 
In the 1880s, railway magnate Sir Edward Watkin proposed a Cheshire Lines-style union of the Cheshire Lines, Wirral, WM&CQ, Cambrian Taff Vale, Barry, Neath & Brecon, Brecon & Merthyr and Swansea Vale Joint Railways to compete with the GWR/LNWR route.
 
Since we're on the subject of who gets what of the New Haven, what lines should we abandon altogether? I know several ideas for lines I would give to the PRR and EL respectively, but what simply can't be saved?
 
@Andrew Boyd, regards the New Haven Railroad, i have make a quick scheme of how the company would be split.

New Haven Map.png


Red: P.R.R.
Blue: Boston & Maine
Yellow: NYC/EL?

For Boston & Maine, since ITTL would be have a North-South Boston Tunnel, this could permit they have direct acess over NEC and to NYC, as wel create direct passenger service since D.C. until north of Portland and Canada too.

Regards the NYC/EL, the lines around Hudson and Pettesfield could be bought by Central, since have a direct link if Water Level Route and Albany too. but i still in doubt about the NEC, since PRR would not be happy have they major rival run around NEC and on they territory.
 
@Lucas

Maybe we can compare once I've done my own map idea?
Nice. Would be wait them. On other hand, i as interesting on your Amtrak regions map. How these would work. Similar to the Steel Interstate, loco hauled/HSR or electrification commuter operations?

I would be work on some ideas for your Amtrak as well some possible stock used.
 
Thoughts on this world: If the world of railroads advances to such a point that it massively reduces interstate trucking, does that mean we get new types of cargo, or perhaps new ways of delivering it? Today we see all kinds of containers and trailers for companies like UPS and FedEx, but what if the railroads were willing to deal with much smaller customers directly using aircraft-style containers? Less-than-carload traffic is time-consuming to handle and deliver, but what if the railroads developed something like the Unit Load Device used on aircraft for use in boxcars and containers? Could this create a completely new class of customers for railroads?
 
Thoughts on this world: If the world of railroads advances to such a point that it massively reduces interstate trucking, does that mean we get new types of cargo, or perhaps new ways of delivering it? Today we see all kinds of containers and trailers for companies like UPS and FedEx, but what if the railroads were willing to deal with much smaller customers directly using aircraft-style containers? Less-than-carload traffic is time-consuming to handle and deliver, but what if the railroads developed something like the Unit Load Device used on aircraft for use in boxcars and containers? Could this create a completely new class of customers for railroads?
Perhaps so. As it is, I thought of the idea of UPS at least having their own set of special mail trains which they operate in collaborations with various railroads.
 
Perhaps so. As it is, I thought of the idea of UPS at least having their own set of special mail trains which they operate in collaborations with various railroads.
Where there is enough UPS traffic that makes a lot of sense, but don't forget about lots of other customers - USPS and FedEx, trucking companies, major retailers, major industrial companies that sell directly to customers and clients - that would benefit from easier logistics.
 
Where there is enough UPS traffic that makes a lot of sense, but don't forget about lots of other customers - USPS and FedEx, trucking companies, major retailers, major industrial companies that sell directly to customers and clients - that would benefit from easier logistics.
Indeed. I can easily see the UPS mail running from Pittsburgh to St. Louis over the PRR Panhandle for one.
 
I recently had an idea regarding if the EL were to indeed take up the Nickel Plate in my TL. What if the EL chooses to use the Erie for its main route to Chicago for higher-speed cargo like inter-modals, then use the NKP line for slower types of trains such as coal and ore trains? Of course, the EL would probably use the lines to Peoria and St. Louis mainly for intermodals, but the NKP Chicago line is still something that does still have some degree of potential even under EL ownership.

That, and I could also see the EL reaching an agreement with the B&O where the former gets the Western Maryland's mainline from Pittsburgh to Baltimore, whereas the B&O in return is allowed to keep the lines that are necessary to keep itself linked to the Reading and CNJ. Just imagine, as a hot-shot intermodal crosses over the B&O trackage several times east bound to Pittsburgh. Meanwhile, a Chessie coal train rumbles furiously along the line on its way to Pittsburgh. Followed soon thereafter by ones of the sections of Amtrak's Capitol Limited bound to Chicago, or the National Limited bound for Kansas City. On the ex-WM bridge above, Nickel Plate #763 eventually passes through with a special excursion; one celebrating a major event in American history no doubt.
 
I was recently thinking what should become of Jerry Jacobson's steam collection since ITTL, the Ohio Central is butterflied by virtue of the PRR never losing the Panhandle.

One idea I had was that it could be based at the B&O roundhouse in Akron since that is where the Cuyahoga Valley RR is based IOTL. From there, Jacobson can lease his steamers for excursion by any interested railroad. Often the Erie Lackawanna for Chessie since the PRR and N&C would have their own preferred steam engines.
 
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