Protect and Survive: The Last Game, February 19, 1984

Interlude 3: Kentucky Emergency State Government Regions by region, headquarters
Western -- Madisonville
Purchase -- Mayfield
Southern -- Glasgow
North Central -- Bardstown
Louisville Metro -- Taylorsville
I-71 -- Carrollton
Northern -- Williamstown
Central -- Versailles
Mid-Central -- Danville
Southeastern -- Corbin
Eastern -- Hazard
Northeastern -- Morehead
CAPITOL -- Frankfort, KYNG UNITS IN VERSAILLES/LAWRENCEBURG READY TO MOVE IN
EXECUTIVE -- DANVILLE (CENTRE COLLEGE)
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR -- BARDSTOWN (CITY GOV'T)
CABINET -- STANFORD (LINCOLN COUNTY H.S.)
GENERAL ASSEMBLY -- DANVILLE/BEREA (CENTRE/BEREA COLL.)
SUPREME COURT -- HARRODSBURG (HARRODSBURG H.S.)
KY NATIONAL GUARD -- DANVILLE

PRIMARY

METRO LOUISVILLE
NORTHERN KENTUCKY/CINCINNATI
LEXINGTON/ARMY DEPOT
FORT KNOX
FORT CAMPBELL

SECONDARY
OWENSBORO
PADUCAH
BARKLEY DAM
WOLF CREEK DAM
MUHLENBERG POWER PLANT

TERTIARY
BOWLING GREEN
TRIMBLE POWER PLANT
ASHLAND
 
Chapter 11
—and here’s the tip-off, and we’re underway here in Stegeman Coliseum for the matchup between the sixth-ranked Lady Vols of Tennessee and the fourth-ranked Lady Bulldogs of Georgia—

—SWAT teams are trying to contain a riot at a supermarket in Philadelphia—

—Nicklaus is giving quite the show in this exhibition on what would have been the final day of the—

—was brought into custody after murdering a family who, according to a police spokesman, was trying to get out of Houston—

—McEnroe will be in attendance for today’s match between Jimmy Connors and—

—prices at this gas station in Chicago are, as you see here, at $6.15 for unleaded—

—that basket puts the Lady Toppers ahead 11-2, and U of L calls a timeout—

—panicked shoppers caused a riot here at a Jacksonville Walmart after rumors spread of an imminent Soviet attack—

—here’s Jordan himself, warming up in what’s expected to be a capacity crowd here in Chapel Hill to see the North Carolina Tar Heels take on Dayton—

—protesters trying to block the entrance into the US Air Force Academy are being rounded up by what we’re told are ‘police forces’. They do look military—

—rumors of several schools being turned into the NCAA for blatant violations involving illegal benefits to players and family members—

—the border crossings here in Arizona are jammed. Everyone we’ve spoken to has either said they’re trying to get somewhere safe or are taking last-minute vacations—

—“Randy Savage. If this is the Last Dance, let me tell you something. It’s going to be the last MATCH you ever wrestle in. They don’t call me the King of Wrestling because I run my mouth. They call me the King because I fight and I win.”—

—power remains down in parts of Los Angeles at this hour, and there’s a group of citizens headed to the Mayor’s office, where there’s already a group of peace protesters—

—“I love Kentucky and I hope they decide to end the war so everything can be normal and the Cats can play basketball. GO CATS!”
 
Chapter 12
—a couple of scores to pass along from women’s college basketball: Western Kentucky leads U of L 23-9 in the first half in Bowling Green. In Athens, Georgia, Georgia leads Tennessee 25-15—

—stay tuned to ESPN. It’s a day full of college basketball: after the women’s game between Tennessee and Georgia, we’ll go to Chapel Hill to watch Michael Jordan and the North Carolina Tar Heels host the Dayton Flyers. Then we’ll head to Bowling Green, Kentucky to watch the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers host the Louisville Cardinals. And we’ll wrap up the day in Nashville, as the Vanderbilt Commodores host the Kentucky Wildcats, who can take the lead in the Southeastern Conference with a win—

—is it…is it…yes! A hole-in-one for the legendary Jack Nicklaus on the third hole here at Riveria Country Club—

—Reds ace Mario Soto will draw the start for the Cincinnati Legends, while Mets pitcher Walt Terrell, driving in from his home in Jeffersonville, Indiana, draws the start for Pete’s All-Stars. We’re looking at a full house in the lower deck and there’s already a crowd behind home plate in the upper deck here at Riverfront—

—“Jimmy, after you play your match today, where are you headed?



“I’m going on a little vacation.

"Where?"

"Oregon.”—

“The oddsmakers in Vegas are taking bets on anything and everything sports related and something not sports-related: there’s 5-2 odds the New York Stock Exchange will open tomorrow. And the casinos along the Strip are full today—

—“Reverend Graham, before we end our conversation, you said in one of your crusades that God was not going to let the world be destroyed by atomic war. Yet here we are, the US and NATO fighting a conventional war against the Soviet Union in western Europe, that could go nuclear at any time. What do you think, now?”

“Roger, I still think that. Even if there is a nuclear war, there will be survivors. God has His plans, and He is on the throne. One day, Christ will return to Earth and sit on His throne and all evil will be destroyed. Swords will be turned into plowshares, and nuclear bombs and missiles will be done away with. If nuclear energy is used, it will be used for peaceful purposes.

But my concern right now is for those who don’t know the Lord, Roger. Those who know Him, if they die by a nuclear bomb or other means, will meet Him in heaven. Those who don’t, will go to a fate far worse than nuclear war. Joshua says ‘choose you this day Whom you will serve’. Jesus is waiting for those who don’t know Him, like you. ‘Come unto Me, all whom are heavy laden, and I will give you rest’.”


Okolona, Kentucky
Southern Jefferson County
31 miles north-northwest of Fort Knox
11 miles south of downtown Louisville
6.6 miles southeast of Standiford Field


The Assemblies of God-affiliated church near the interstate was full this day, the war’s dark shadow held at bay by the devout worshipping their Lord and praying for a miracle.

Every room in the church/school complex turned into an overflow room, television screens showing the sermon over closed-circuit TV. The school’s gym — with the team picture of the school’s boys’ basketball team that made an Milan-esque Sweet 16 run in 1982 — was crammed.

The construction going on nearby, for the new church and school, the new football and baseball fields and basketball gym, as far as anyone knew might never be completed.

In the sanctuary, the Pastor walked up to the podium, and turned his Bible to the Book of Matthew, Chapter 24:

1 And Jesus went out, and departed from the temple: and his disciples came to him for to shew him the buildings of the temple.
2 And Jesus said unto them, See ye not all these things? verily I say unto you, There shall not be left here one stone upon another, that shall not be thrown down.
3 And as he sat upon the mount of Olives, the disciples came unto him privately, saying, Tell us, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?
4 And Jesus answered and said unto them, Take heed that no man deceive you.
5 For many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and shall deceive many.
6 And ye shall hear of wars and rumours of wars: see that ye be not troubled: for all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet.
7 For nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom: and there shall be famines, and pestilences, and earthquakes, in divers places.
8 All these are the beginning of sorrows.
9 Then shall they deliver you up to be afflicted, and shall kill you: and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name's sake.
10 And then shall many be offended, and shall betray one another, and shall hate one another.
11 And many false prophets shall rise, and shall deceive many.
12 And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold.
13 But he that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved.

14 And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.

“No matter what we see on the news, no matter how bad things get, even if this city is destroyed, I do not believe the Lord will allow this world to be destroyed,” the Pastor said. “Even if nuclear war comes to this country, and even if this city is destroyed, there is much work yet to be done for the Gospel.

“For those who know the Lord, He will see you through the darkest of times,” heard the Freshman, sitting in the back of the cafeteria, watching the Pastor preach on the large projection screen like everyone else.

The Freshman had the newspaper's sports section in his hand, having read it cover to cover;

  • Stories on UK and U of L playing their last games for the time being,
  • stories about other teams having played their last games on Saturday,
  • horse racing results from tracks holding their last meets,
  • columnists writing on yesterday, today and the future,
  • and an expanded outdoors section giving instructions on fishing and hunting in a fallout-rich environment.

It also had results from games played by some boys’ and girls’ high school and men’s and women’s small college basketball teams throughout Kentucky and southern Indiana:

  • Woodford County won the Kentucky state wrestling meet, held in Frankfort, and with all of the Louisville- and northern Kentucky schools declining to send their teams (as did schools near military bases). In Indiana, Delta won the team wrestling title at Carmel High School;
  • Two guards combined to score 70 points as Austin’s girls’ basketball team won both of its games in the Seymour Sectional. Austin’s reward — a berth in the girls’ Final Four in Indianapolis — would have to wait until tensions ended. Three other sectional tournaments were held in Indiana, and like Austin, Eastbrook, Warren Central and Crown Point would have to wait to play for a state title (officially, the girls' Final Four and the boys' postseason tournaments were on hold);
  • The Union men beat Berea to win the Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title;
  • A girl scored 45 points to help the Belfry girls win (most of the games played in Kentucky were in the mountains or in the western half of the state);
  • A boy scored 46 points for Tipton in a boys’ game played in Indiana, far north of the Louisville area.

A number of southern Indiana boys’ basketball teams played Saturday, although schools in Clark and Floyd counties — across the Ohio River from Louisville — cancelled their Saturday games. Schools in the city of Louisville and Jefferson County and Oldham, Bullitt and Hardin counties in Kentucky did the same.

The official reason was adherence to Kentucky High School Athletic Association guidelines, but everyone really knew why.

The Freshman’s season ended Friday night. The high school’s team upset its public school district rival down the street and had gotten back much of its notoriety and reputation from two years ago. He thought the team had a chance to get to the regional tournament and, maybe, get back to Rupp Arena for the Sweet 16, the real state tournament. The Christian-school state tournament played before the districts had been cancelled, but he didn’t care.

The only thing he cared about right now, was he and his family staying alive.

After the sermon, he, his dad, his brother and some cousins would go back to his home, clear out every usable thing, and head down to live with some relatives on his mom’s side in nearby Grayson County. If the worst came to pass, they would hear — and feel — the explosions in nearby Fort Knox, but far enough away they wouldn’t be hit by the blasts. They’d only have to deal with fallout.

His dad quit his job with the local power company on Friday. He figured whoever ran the power company in Leitchfield wouldn’t care, especially if there was a shortage of crane operators in the area. His dad also did what his Lord was asking him to do, by leading his family out of immediate harm’s way.

The Freshman thought about that, and looked up. The Pastor was finishing his sermon.



“Now those of you who don’t know the Lord, if there is any time to give your heart to Him, now is that time!!! I want everyone here, everyone in the overflow rooms, to bow your head. If you don’t know Jesus, I want you to raise your hand—“

The Freshman raised his hand.

He prayed Jesus would save his soul. He prayed Jesus would save himself and his family from Soviet missiles.



And he prayed, someday after things simmered down, he’d get to play basketball for the Kentucky Wildcats.
 
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Wow - great, powerful stuff. (By the way, I’ll actually be in Louisville in a month, on my way to Cincinnati and Pittsburgh!)

Anyway, who was the pastor in Okolona, Kentucky? The guy who started the Creation Museum in OTL, by chance?
 
Anyway, who was the pastor in Okolona, Kentucky? The guy who started the Creation Museum in OTL, by chance?
NO NO NO NO NO NO NO....

No. :)

The Pastor IRL is a man who at the time led Louisville's largest Pentecostal/charismatic church. He passed away in November, 1988.
 
The following is my attempt to reconcile canon with the aforementioned Cincinnati Post article that reported the Indiana state government would have relocated to a facility for developmentally-challenged people in Jennings County, Indiana (south of Indianapolis and out of the Indianapolis and Louisville blast zones).
 
Chapter 13
—after the Kentucky game there’ll be a brief post-game show, and then Milton Metz will have a special program going up to midnight discussing how best to prepare for every possible contingency over the next few days and weeks. Milton will have a representative from Kentucky Civil Defense and will talk with WHAS gardening expert Fred Wiche and Courier-Journal outdoors writer Jim Strader. That’s after tonight’s UK-Vandy game, here on 84 WHAS.

I’m Kim Scott, here with Joe Donovan, and we’re taking your calls up to pre-game for the U of L versus Western Kentucky men’s basketball game…excuse me. Folks, we’re going to go to news director Brian Rublein for a news report. Brian?

Kim, Joe, we received word a few minutes ago of massive explosions at the Muscatatuck State Developmental Center near Butlerville in Jennings County, Indiana. According to our sister station, WHAS-11, the explosions were heard in Mount Vernon, the county seat, and as far away as Seymour…excuse me. Right now? Alright…we’re going to switch now to WHAS-11’s news coverage. Reporter Chuck Olmstead is talking via telephone with Walt Prince, a Butlerville resident who saw the explosion.

WP:…we heard the explosion, and it jolted my car and scared my wife half to death.
CO: You were leaving church.
WP: Yes. We were headed to Mount Vernon for lunch. We heard the explosion, I slammed on the brakes, and, I think, seconds later, I saw the smoke.
CO: How far were you from the explosion?

WP: Oh Lord, we’re right there, off State Road 50, we just left church and heard it, pulled over, and saw a lot of smoke, and flames. I checked on Winona, made sure she was safe, and Bob from church came to check on us.
CO: How good of a look did you get of the building?
WP: We weren’t close enough to get a close look at it, but close enough to see that all you could see was smoke and flames. That place employs a lot of people here in Jennings County, you know. It houses, or housed, folks whom my granddaughter reminds me to say ‘developmentally disabled’.
CO: You said ‘housed’.
WP: Yessir.
Housed. The news never reported it, not even the North Vernon paper, but they got moved out after that plane crashed in West Germany that killed all them people. State government began moving in, we heard the General Assembly was moving in yesterday or today, the Governor was supposed to move in today or tomorrow.
CO: So the regular residents were moved out and the state began moving in, after the airliner crashed in Munich, just over a week ago.
WP: Yes.
CO: Where were they taken?

WP: Terre Haute, I think. That’s what some of the people working there told me.
CO: And no official announcement?

WP: Nope. Everyone who worked there’s under some kind of gag order, can’t talk to the press. But you know how the grapevine works. I’m surprised you folks at Channel 11 didn’t know about the people leaving, or the state moving in.
CO: It’s been a busy few weeks, but that is something for us to follow up on.
WP: Well I got another scoop for you. Somebody came by the next day, the day after the plane crash in Germany, said they were from Indianapolis, said the state was taking over the hospital for the time being, don’t say anything until the Governor makes the announcement. Probably within the week. It spread all over Butlerville, all over the county, I talked to people from Brownstown and Seymour who heard about it. Governor Orr would show up when they started fighting in Europe. We’ve never seen anything that would tell us the Governor was here in the county. Just rumors and what that fella said, after that plane crash.
CO: And according to these rumors, according to what the representative told you, Governor Orr would be in Jennings County about now, since fighting broke out in Europe yesterday.
WP: I hope for his sake he wasn’t.
CO: Why is that?

WP: From what I saw that explosion was bad. I reckon ain’t nobody gonna survive that.—


BULLETIN (AP)

(INDIANAPOLIS) — GOVERNOR ROBERT ORR IS SAFE AT THE GOVERNOR’S MANSION AND WILL ADDRESS THE STATE SUNDAY EVENING, PRESS SECRETARY R. MARK LUBBERS TOLD INDIANAPOLIS TELEVISION STATION W-I-S-H.

“GOVERNOR ORR IS ALIVE AND SAFE AT HIS MANSION,” ORR TOLD W-I-S-H. “HE WILL GIVE AN ADDRESS TO THE STATE TONIGHT (SUNDAY EVENING) AT EIGHT O’CLOCK. THE GOVERNOR WILL ADDRESS THE STATUS OF THE STATE GOVERNMENT AND WHERE HE AND ALL OTHER IMPORTANT OFFICIALS WILL RELOCATE FOR THE DURATION OF THE EMERGENCY.”

WHEN ASKED IF ANY STATE OFFICIALS WERE AT THE MUSCATATUCK STATE DEVELOPMENTAL CENTER IN JENNINGS COUNTY, INDIANA THAT WAS DESTROYED THIS MORNING, AND ABOUT THE CURRENT STATUS OF THE FACILITY’S RESIDENTS, LUBBERS SAID: “I CANNOT DISCUSS EITHER RIGHT NOW FOR SECURITY REASONS. THE GOVERNOR WILL ADDRESS BOTH ISSUES TONIGHT.”

THE MUSCATATUCK STATE DEVELOPMENTAL CENTER, 74 MILES SOUTHEAST OF INDIANAPOLIS, HOUSED DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED PERSONS. TERRE HAUTE TELEVISION STATION W-T-H-I REPORTED TODAY THAT RESIDENTS AND SOME WORKERS HAD MOVED INTO DORMITORIES AT INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY THIS PAST FRIDAY THE 17TH.

TELEVISION STATION W-H-A-S IN LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY AIRED A TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH A BUTLERVILLE, INDIANA RESIDENT WHO CLAIMED TO HAVE BEEN TOLD BY AN UNIDENTIFIED STATE GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL THAT THE STATE GOVERNMENT HAD BEGUN MOVING INTO THE MUSCATATUCK FACILITY AFTER THE ATTACK ON A U-S AIR FORCE TRANSPORT PLANE IN MUNICH, WEST GERMANY ON FEBRUARY 10TH THAT KILLED 310 RELATIVES OF U-S MILITARY PERSONNEL RETURNING TO THE U-S.

AP-DT-02-19-84 1237EST


--(Terri Dorsey, WSMV reporter) The bus carrying the players and coaches and staff of the University of Kentucky men's and women's basketball teams, and press and other university officials, has arrived here at Memorial Gym on the Vandy campus. They were greeted by about 60 anti-war protestors, some of whom carried signs stating such slogans as 'NO GAMES WHEN THE BOMB HITS' and 'NO PEACE NO GAMES'. The protestors were separated by campus and Metro police, and the bus went to Memorial Gym without incident.

Vandy officials expect a crowd of about 2,000 people for today's doubleheader, with the women tipping off at 1 p.m. and the men at 5 p.m. There's already a small but loud contingent of Kentucky fans here to support their team. I spoke to some of them a short while ago:

Brandy Phillips, UK student: I live in Scottsville, and my boyfriend and me wanted to drive down to see the Cats play.

Chris Hall, Bowling Green resident: Tickets are pretty cheap and it's a good distraction from what's going on right now.

George Conner, Hopkinsville resident: We left town a few days ago, I have a place outside Bowling Green that should be safe. I promised my grandson I'd take him to a UK game, and we've pretty much done everything we can to prepare. The game's being played, and it was a pretty safe drive down here.

Vanderbilt campus police chief Robert Collins says the campus is as secure as it can be.

RC: We're confident in the security of the campus, and the gym, for today's games. I understand someone not wanting to come down and watch, but if anyone wants to, they'll be as safe and secure as you can get here in town.

Collins says anyone wanting to see the games in person should arrive about an hour early. Extra security measures are in place and fans will be searched at the gate. Vehicles also are subject to search by campus and Metro police. However, Collins expects today's games to be a routine affair.

RC: We have security in place, we're confident everything will go off without a hitch.

For fans who don't want to watch in person, they can listen to coverage on WSM-FM or watch on Channel 17 and on the ESPN cable channel. Terri Dorsey, Channel 4 News.--
 
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Chapter 14
The Senator drove down Interstate 65 with his family in his Buick on this overcast winter day.

The scenery, if you want to call it that, was full of trees who had long lost their fall foliage and were waiting for a spring that many people were convinced would never come.

The state Senator from Glasgow kept his eyes on the road and for any unexpected surprises: the state police cars assigned to escort him were welcomed, especially given the rumors about random attacks on public figures that had spread through Kentucky’s state capitol the past few days.

While the Senator kept an eye out, his wife passed the time reading a paperback novel, his daughter wrote in her journal and his son played an electronic football game. The sounds of the game, the turning of pages and the pen writing on paper were the only things that broke the long silence.

Not a word had been spoken since they left Frankfort, and no one was in a mood to speak.

The Senator’s thoughts were on the 272-page document he helped author, titled Operation Exodus, that was rejected by the Adjutant General. His own document, written supposedly in consultation with a host of people (including counterparts from other states), prevailed. Instead of sending the Governor to a Middlesboro, a small southeastern Kentucky town on the Tennessee border, she would go either to Berea or Danville.

Middlesboro was just out of the expected past of the worst of the fallout from the Dakotas. Berea and Danville was right in the middle of it.

For his cooperation (and not fighting for his own post-war plans), the Senator and his family would be assigned to head the Southern Regional branch of the state government from the state’s largest post-war recovery center: the massive complex of Mammoth Cave.

He would make appearances in Glasgow, the regional government center, to talk to the mayor and city and county leaders. He and his family would stay in town until the nukes flew: then, they’d all be evacuated to Mammoth Cave, where all of the artifacts and medications and food and water and other essential and important items would be kept.

If he could get through Fat Man’s Misery, he could probably survive in the cave.

But how long would he be there?
 
Chapter 15: Not for public consumption
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

CONGRESSIONAL JOINT COMMITTEE ON ENEMY ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE HOMELAND

...

SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

...

KENTUCKY

...

...Spetsnaz activity in Kentucky was first noticed one week before the nuclear exchange, on 2/14/84. A sole agent, male, of Hispanic descent was observed taking multiple photographs of a power plant in Trimble County that was under construction. When approached by a county policeman, the agent fired, killing the officer. Another county officer was able to call for backup before being shot himself. The agent then attempted to flee the scene, only to get into a shootout with state and county police. The agent was shot, and taken to a nearby hospital under guard.

Weapons found in his possession included one Dragunov sniper rifle and one Marakov semi-automatic pistol, along with materiel to make a crude Molotov cocktail...

...On 2/15/84, a Caucasian male of German descent was observed taking photographs around the area of the Blue Grass Army Depot outside of the town of Richmond. Despite the area being under increased military guard and surveillance, the agent managed to sneak in and take several pictures. The agent was confronted by a group of military patrolmen, leading to an exchange of gunfire. The agent was shot mortally, and upon capture was taken to an on base medical facility, where he was declared dead upon arrival...

...also on 2/15, a Caucasian female, driving a stolen Ford F-150 pickup truck, was pulled over by a city policewoman in Covington, near Cincinnati. The truck had been observed committing a traffic violation (the nature of which was not noted in surviving records) and pulled over. The female, at first cooperative, increasingly became agitated as a check confirmed the truck had been stolen from outside Steubenville, Ohio, the day before. The officer also observed that the cab had several large boxes, covered by a tarp. When the officer walked back to the truck, the driver shot at her four times, striking her once in the shoulder. That enabled the driver to leave the scene; the officer then radioed for help.

Covington police rendezvoused with the truck on Interstate 71, just under a mile north of the Brent Spence Bridge into Cincinnati, Ohio. The truck swerved erratically attempting to avoid the police. Kentucky State police and a National Guard truck joined the chase. The truck rammed several vehicles on the bridge, then pulled to a stop. One of the National Guard trucks and a Covington patrol car avoided the pileup of vehicles and sped towards the now-stopped truck. The driver, by now having stepped out of the vehicle, was observed by the officer driving the Covington patrol car to be attempting to light something in the cab of the truck. He swerved to a stop, pulled his handgun and told the woman "hands over your head and hit the ground". She reached for a handgun in her jacket, and was shot twice by a passenger in the National Guard truck...

...approximately 75 pounds of explosives were uncovered in the cab of the truck, enough to seriously damage the Brent Spence bridge if not cause it to collapse entirely...

...that same day, two Spetsnaz agents, one posing as a businessman from Belgium, another as a University of Kentucky student from New York state, carried out their plan to kill the members of the university's Board of Regents, meeting to vote on whether to continue or suspend school operations...

...the intention of killing the members of a university board of regents, as opposed to the mayor of the city of Lexington, or the governor of Kentucky, makes sense in light of known Spetsnaz doctrine: use terror to disrupt domestic activities as much as possible and give the Soviets an advantage in the event of a war between them and NATO...
 
Chapter 16
State Militia will supplement,
not replace, National Guard


By ROBERT T. GARRETT
Courier-Journal Staff Writer

FRANKFORT, Ky. -- Governor Martha Layne Collins signed into law the recreation of the Kentucky State Militia yesterday, but it will have different responsibilities than it did when it was created before World War II.

The State Militia was created in 1940 to take on the duties of the Kentucky National Guard when that body was called into active military service. It operated until it was disbanded in late 1946 to make way for a new Kentucky National Guard body.

This time, however, the State Militia will be a part of the Kentucky National Guard, said Adjutant General Billy G. Wellman.

"It won't replace the National Guard, although the State Militia will be able to carry out its duties," Wellman told reporters. "It will be a separate unit, ready to be called to duty in every emergency, whenever needed."

The state's National Guard now has over 9,500 officers and enlistees, boosted by recruitment efforts in light of current tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. 1,600 of those enlistees are slated to help form the bulk of State Militia personnel.

When asked if the State Militia would be used as a peacekeeping force in the event of a nuclear exchange, Wellman said: "Defending the state and helping keep the peace has to be a consideration in that scenario. We want peace, absolutely, but we will not be unprepared if the worst happens."

Enlistees will be sent to four towns - Bowling Green, Corbin, Paris and Versailles - within the next week to begin basic training, Wellman said.


*********************************************

KENTUCKY NATIONAL GUARD
Ronald Reagan, President, United States of America
State Commander-in-Chief Martha Layne Collins, Governor, Commonwealth of Kentucky
Adjutant General Billy G. Wellman, Major General

JOINT FORCE HEADQUARTERS: Boone National Guard Center, Frankfort (official), Danville High School, Danville (temporary)

KENTUCKY ARMY NATIONAL GUARD
Commander
: Ken Smith, Colonel
Headquarters: Frankfort (official), Danville High School, Danville (temporary)
63rd Theater Aviation Brigade - Frankfort (official), Harrodsburg (temporary)
75th Troop Command - Frankfort (official), Paris (temporary)
133d Mobile Public Affairs Detachment - Frankfort (official), Danville (temporary)
149th Armored Brigade - Richmond (official)
123rd Armor Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - Madisonville (temporary)
138th Field Artillery Brigade - Bardstown (temporary)
149th Infantry Regiment - Glasgow (temporary)
238th Regiment - Frankfort (official)
1st Field Artillery Battalion - Pikeville (temporary)
2nd Modular Training Battalion - Glasgow (temporary)
438th Military Police Company - Frankfort (official), Danville (temporary)
Recruiting and Retention Battalion - Frankfort (official), Danville (temporary)

KENTUCKY AIR NATIONAL GUARD
Commander
: John L. Smith, Commander
Headquarters: Louisville (official former), Frankfort (official emergency)
123rd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing - Bowling Green Airport, Bowling Green (temporary)
Planes: RF-4C Phantom II

KENTUCKY ACTIVE MILITIA
Headquarters
: Lexington (official), Harrodsburg High School, Harrodsburg (temporary)
Commander: Robert Fiorella, Brigadier General
First Regiment
First Battalion
- Warren Central High School, Bowling Green
1st Company State Guard - Madisonville
6th Company State Guard - Cave City
7th Company State Guard - Bardstown
9th Company State Guard - Beaver Dam
12th Company State Guard - Taylorsville
Second Battalion - Paris High School, Paris
2nd Company State Guard - Carrollton
8th Company State Guard - Maysville
13th Company State Guard - Walton
Third Battalion - Woodford County High School, Versailles
14th Company State Guard - Georgetown
15th Company State Guard - Winchester
16th Company State Guard - Morehead
5th Company State Guard - Ashland
Fourth Battalion - Corbin High School, Corbin
3rd Company State Guard - London
4th Company State Guard - Pikeville
10th Company State Guard - Middlesboro
11th Company State Guard - Hazard
 
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Writer's note: I am going to take some artistic license in portraying how the Kentucky media would react to broadcasting and publishing when the Exchange becomes imminent.

I tried to find verification for The Courier-Journal's plans to print editions in Shelbyville, Kentucky using the Shelbyville Evening News's press (Shelbyville is far enough out of the Louisville blast zone it would be worth the while), but I could not. In fact, I can't recall finding anything regarding any newspaper's preparation for publishing in the buildup to and after a nuclear war; if any reader knows of such a document, whether it's a story at newspapers dot com, or somewhere on the web (like Internet Archive), please let me know.

The same goes for how I plan to portray TV and radio preparations: there's nothing I could find that even addressed the issue, much less went into preparations. This goes for national coverage: the only known reference is the infamous 'doomsday video' that has been said to be carried on CNN if and when the missiles flew. A lot of the people who worked at those publications and stations in the 1980s are either long retired or passed away, and given both the newspaper and broadcasting industries' penchant for hiring for youth over experience, there are few people left working at any outlet who might know of any plans.

So, I wing it, making my best guesses as to how these publications and stations back in the day would have addressed the issue, and made plans to publish/broadcast up to and after the war.
 
Chapter 17
Nashville, Tennessee
Memorial Gymnasium, Vanderbilt University


The Announcer found his way to press row, behind one of the baskets, and was told by a member of Vanderbilt’s Sports Information department that a very important person needed to speak with him urgently. He saw the name and number on the paper given to him, raised his eyebrows in surprise, and called from his and his broadcasting partner’s seats.

Cawood?”, said the Governor from her office in Frankfort. “Thanks for calling. I know you’re busy, and I don’t want to take up any more of your time than I have to.”

I’m busy?!?, the Announcer thought to himself. “Governor Collins, it’s a pleasure. What can I do for you?”

When you get to Lexington tonight, I’d like you to call this number so we can set something up for tomorrow. I want you to consider an opportunity working for me.”

“Well, Governor, I’m honored you thought of me, although I am rather employed at the moment, and I’m hoping that it stays that way,” he said. “I’m sure you’re hoping things turn around soon.”

“You’re right, but it isn’t looking like they’re going to,” she replied. “Cawood, if the worst happens, we’re not going to hunker down and try to wait out the fallout. I’ve talked to some fellow governors — Governor Kerrey in Nebraska, Governor Alexander of Tennessee, and Governor Graham in Florida — and they’re making plans to survive the worst and get through it. So am I. Cawood, I need you.

“Governor, I’m flattered, but I planned to go home after we get back to Lexington.”

“What about the call-in show tomorrow night?”

“Still on, though I expect it to be cancelled with the Soviets pushing west. If we do a show, I plan to call in from my house.”

“I see…Cawood, we’re putting together a state television and radio network and we’re using KET and the university radio stations, and the commercial radio and TV stations that would come under the Emergency Broadcast System, as the ‘affiliates’. We’ll broadcast out of Danville on radio to start. If Richmond nor Lexington or both aren’t attacked, and when it’s safe to do so, we’ll move the headquarters to one of those cities. I need announcers that people will recognize, and will listen to. If things get bad, that network will need those voices. It’ll need your voice.”

The Announcer paused. He didn’t want to say yes, but couldn’t quite say no, either. “Governor, I’d like some time to think about it. I want to talk to my wife, Frances.”

“Of course, Cawood. I still want the man heading the network to talk to you tonight, regardless.”

“Who is heading this ‘network’?”

I think you know him, already. It’s Jim Host,” the CEO of Host Communications, a man with many ties to the University of Kentucky, particularly the University of Kentucky Athletic Association board. "Jim’s working with the commercial stations. Len Press of KET’s working with the stations at Western, Eastern, Murray and Morehead. Jim will talk with you about programming.”

“Does he — you — want me to be the program director?”

I don’t think so,” she said. “Cawood, we need people on the air that people know and like, who can calm people in a post-war environment. I don’t want some scared kid on the air stumbling his or her way through a script. I want professionals who know what to say to folks and how to say it.”

“Alright,” he said, as the Vanderbilt women’s team ran out onto the court, with the school fight song playing over the speakers; neither school brought their bands to the game. “I’ll talk to Jim, and Frances wouldn’t let hear the end of it if I didn’t talk to her about this, and I’ll give you my decision tomorrow.”

KENTUCKY BROADCASTING NETWORK

KENTUCKY EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION AFFILIATES

Ashland-Huntington, WKAS 25
Bowling Green, WKGB 53

Covington, WCVN 54 X
Elizabethtown, WKZT 23 X

Hazard, WKHA 35
Lexington, WKLE 46 KET FLAGSHIP ?

Louisville, WKMJ 68 X
Madisonville, WKMA 35
Morehead, WKMR 38
Murray, WKMU 21

Owensboro, WKOH 31 X
Owenton, WKON 52
Paducah, WKPD 29 ?
Pikeville, WKPI 22
Somerset, WKSO 29 KET ALTERNATE FLAGSHIP - CLOSE TO EMERGENCY STATE GOVERNMENT

PUBLIC TELEVISION STATIONS
Bowling Green, WKYU 24

Louisville, WKPC 15 X

COMMERCIAL TELEVISION STATIONS
Ashland, WTSF 61
Beattyville, WLJC 65
Bowling Green, WBKO 13
Campbellsville, WGRB 34
Danville, no call letters 56 ALTERNATE FLAGSHIP FOR TV NETWORK
Hazard, WKYH 57
Hopkinsville, WNKJ 51
Lexington, WLEX 18; WKYT 27 TENTATIVE FLAGSHIP FOR TV NETWORK; WTVQ 36 ???

Louisville, WAVE 3; WHAS 11; WLKY 32; WDRB 41 X
Paducah, WPSD 6 ?

KEY: ? = possible target, unsure if Soviets would target area. Red = definite target.


Evansville (Owensboro, western Kentucky), Nashville (Bowling Green), Knoxville (southeastern Kentucky), Cincinnati (northern Kentucky), Huntington (Ashland), Louisville all considered in Red.

NOTE: If Paducah is attacked, towns outside the attack area would still get television stations from Harrisburg and Carbondale, Illinois and Cape Girardeau, Missouri and radio from the Harrisburg/Carbondale/southern Illinois area and the Cape Girardeau/southeastern/'bootheel' Missouri area, plus Maysville, Calvert City, Benton, Fulton and other towns in the Purchase/western Kentucky/northwestern Tennessee area.

NOTE 2: If Evansville and/or Owensboro are attacked, current plans are to have area served by stations from Madisonville and Central City.

NOTE 3: Cadiz and Elkton/Russelville would serve towns outside the Fort Campbell/Hopkinsville/Clarksville attack area. Hopkinsville is expected to take severe damage in the event of an attack on Fort Campbell and Clarksville is expected to be almost completely decimated.

NOTE 4: Towns/cities outside the Louisville/Elizabethtown/Fort Knox attack area would be served by Brandenburg; Hodgenville; Mumfordville; Taylorsville; Bardstown; Shelbyville; and Carrollton.

The viability of each of the markets is subject to the final attack pattern, actual fallout patterns and the stability of the cities/towns in question.


KENTUCKY BROADCASTING NETWORK RADIO

The plan at present is to use all stations assigned to the Emergency Broadcast System. Other stations would be allowed on air over the next 12 months.

The flagship officially is WVLK-AM in Lexington, practically WHIR-AM in Danville.

ALL KBN PERSONNEL ARE EXPECTED TO BE IN DANVILLE BY 2000 HOURS/8:00 PM EASTERN STANDARD TIME MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20.
 
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I can imagine Homer Simpson's response to the news of a nuclear missile headed towards Springfield.

BTW, there is a Springfield in Kentucky, in Adair County, which is in the western part of the state.
 
Also, I'm working on a list that would chronicle the 21st from the perspective of Associated Press wire reports...but that's will be posted way, way down the road.

The 19th and 20th have enough going on to stress everybody out :evilsmile:
 
Chapter 18 New
New York City

The Anchor sighed, frustrated over the conversation she just had with a friend who was in the Anchor’s home state of Kentucky. Of all places, she expected her friend to be in Vermont with family, or perhaps in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Instead, she was in the town of Harrodsburg. And shouldn’t she be reporting in Washington, or Chicago, or New York?

The Anchor tried to push the conversation out of her mind: the network need her on the air and ready to go in an hour. She felt safe enough, as the network had made arrangements with the New York Police Department to protect the broadcast center on West 57th. Unless a mob overran the police, no one would get in who didn’t need to be there. 

Still…she couldn’t get one part of the conversation out of her mind.



“Diane, you need to get out of New York.”

“I have obligations—“

“You’ll die there.”

“As a journalist, I have to report, wherever the news is—“

“You’re the morning anchor—“

“Yes, and as one of the morning anchors, I have an obligation to that job and to my profession, to my colleagues, to this network—“

“Believe me, I understand. None of that is going to protect you, protect me. That’s why I left the cities, why I left my job. And there’s news here, in Kentucky.”

“What news? The military bases?”

“No…I can’t say, yet. Diane, you need to get here, now.”

“I would like to know, at least, what I’m being asked to leave my job and obligations for.”

“I can’t tell you — yet — but give me a day. I’ll call you tomorrow. Or if you get time, call me at 606-555-1245. Diane, this is big.”

“I’m sorry, but I have to decline—“

“Look. There’s not going to be a New York, a Washington. All the big cities will be gone—“

“And the smaller cities. Louisville.”

“Yes, Diane, Louisville. But people will survive. There’s a plan for it. You need to be a part. They could use you and your skills—“

“I have obligations—“

“SCREW your obligations!!!…people you knew, from Louisville, from high school, are here. It’s beautiful here…and I’m making more of a difference than I could reporting on some mob and waiting to die in a nuclear attack…Diane, consider it. Please.”


The Anchor was shaken from her thoughts by the young woman standing with a cup of coffee. “Ms. Sawyer? They need you. They want to go over the day’s events before you go live. Here, take this coffee. You need it more than I do.”

The Anchor smiled at the young lady, whose smile couldn’t hide the anxiety in her eyes. She was from Nebraska, and the Anchor knew some people who could get her a ticket to Omaha — hopefully safe and sound. “Thank you,” the Anchor said, standing up and stretching some before taking the paper cup. “How long are you here tonight?”

“I’m working through your shift,” the young woman said.

“I’d like to talk to you after this meeting,” the Anchor said. Leaning in, and in a whisper, she asked, “would you like to go home?”

“Oh my God yes.”

“Don’t talk about this to anyone, but I can get you a ticket to Omaha. I know someone who can get it without a problem.”

“Oh my…Miss—“

“Just focus on your job, and I’ll see you after my meeting.”

The Anchor wasn’t concerned about being able to get the ticket for the intern. She was more concerned about being able to get the ticket for herself, if she decided she wanted out.
 
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