Proposals and War Aims That Didn't Happen Map Thread

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Beedok, Jun 15, 2014.

  1. Clandango Disestablishmentarianist

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    I imagine it is like it a planet cracked into pieces. Gravity would still pull them together.
     
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  2. Christory Well-Known Member

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    If only Russia could do that too...
     
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  3. Clandango Disestablishmentarianist

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    To be fair, the land they don't currently have doesn't have the most Russians anyways, outside of some frontier areas or places where there were massive population 'exchanges' during Soviet times. I think of it like Prussia during the Napoleonic Wars. People might say Napoleon was unfair to them as stolen half their land, when outside of a couple small areas on the Rhine, all the stuff they lost was things they seized from Poland or swallowed up from neighboring German states.
     
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  4. Christory Well-Known Member

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    Not exactly.

    [​IMG]

    Even if you're just taking Russians into account rather than the full East Slavic group (the equivalent of looking at New Englanders rather than Americans as a whole):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Bleh Postpostmodern Neobrutalism

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    The Russian annexation of Crimea and subsequent invasion of Donetsk and Luhansk has strongly reinforced the Ukrainian national, ethnic, and linguistic identity as one distinct and separate from Russian, I would hardly say it's accurate to call Ukraine the New England to Russia's USA.
     
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  6. Bleh Postpostmodern Neobrutalism

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    Also, Ukrainian is only partially mutually intelligible with Russian, Ukraine is its own country, and has long portions of its history as being separate from Russia. None of this is true of New England and the US.
     
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  7. Vuu Resident Serb expert Banned

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    You do have to take into account how ephemeral identities can be, tho
     
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  8. Suvareshkin Well-Known Member

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    In the context of history? Perhaps.

    When it comes to the perception of an individual, things are quite different.
     
  9. Bleh Postpostmodern Neobrutalism

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    I don't see why that's necessarily true in this case. Yes, identities are fluid, but they're certainly not formless ether. Identities are self-reinforcing, particularly against one another and particularly in this situation. Every Ukrainian I've met is pretty serious and unyielding about the fact that they're Ukrainian and explicitly not Russian. Since Crimea, they've been willing to get in a fight about it.
     
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  10. Mr. Bubbles Well-Known Member

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    Ottoman_Claims.png
    The Ottoman Empire's ambitions for a Central Powers victory.
    * Annexing Kuwait, the Dodecanese Islands, and Kars
    * Making client states out of Egypt, Sudan, and many lands in southern Arabia and the Caucasus
    * Extending their influence as far east as Iran and Afghanistan
     
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  11. simplysupported47 Member

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    Why would there be an Armenia? Didn't the Ottomans try to kill them all during WW1?
     
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  12. Mr. Bubbles Well-Known Member

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    I'm not entirely sure. The Ottomans were terrified of Armenian nationalism, especially because of their large population in eastern Anatolia, where it was thought they might ally themselves with the christian Russians against the empire. I'm guessing the idea with the client state was, more or less, to purge them from Ottoman territory proper, push whoever was left somewhere else, and economically exploit them.

    Or it might not have been Armenian at all, but instead populated by Azeris. Either way is horrifying.
     
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  13. Messalian Liberation Theologian

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    I fear that you are correct in that the Ottomans saw the Armenians as the Nazis saw the Poles: obstacles to be annihilated in the aftermath of victory.
     
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  14. Mr. Bubbles Well-Known Member

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    Same with the Greeks and Assyrians
     
  15. Spiritual Sausage Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    I found this when doing some research on the Georgian Civil War; this appears to be a map of the Confederation of Mountain Peoples of the Caucasus' claimed borders. I have no idea if this map is accurate or not but I thought it was interesting enough to share.

    - from my Russian friend
     
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  16. Chris S Member

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    Shouldn't this Sudan include present day South Sudan?
     
  17. FancyHat Well-Known Member

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    What's your source for this?
     
  18. Mr. Bubbles Well-Known Member

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  19. LouisTheGreyFox The Hyperactive Furry Historian

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    [​IMG]

    I stumbled upon this through Google Images and I am going to admit I found some interest in this.
     
  20. Crying Your ideology is shit, SHIIIIIIIIT

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    Propaganda really is something else, huh?