Proposals and War Aims That Didn't Happen Map Thread

Okay, maybe I'm reading it wrong, but I don't see anything in the quoted image to even remotely suggest the British were considering letting Hungary keep territories acquired from Slovakia and Yugoslavia.

The quoted image says the Foreign Office (that is the British foreign office) did up a paper which explicitly is quoted as saying that as a defeated enemy state Hungary has no special considerations in regards to her future frontier particularly with regards to the British allies of Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia, but that this does not necessarily hold with regards to Romania as another defeated enemy state. It later states that the British Foreign Office's paper on the subject proposed the immediate return to Trianon borders for Hungary in relation to Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia with the allusion that this would be disabuse the Hungarians of even the faintest ideas that special consideration would be given to revision of the Trianon frontiers.

The only possible non-Trianon boundaries envisioned are clearly only with Romania.
Directly after the sentence you're quoting mentions that "as regards Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, . . . hope that sympathetic considerations will be given to some revisions of the Trianon frontiers." Ofc, who knows how "sympathetic" Yugo and CS is going to be to a nation who annexed their territories but I was simply speculating that these two government in exiles wouldn't have as much influence as Britain on the peace table, so I could imagine that Britain forces their hand to revise their borders to prevent future conflict.
 
Directly after the sentence you're quoting mentions that "as regards Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, . . . hope that sympathetic considerations will be given to some revisions of the Trianon frontiers." Ofc, who knows how "sympathetic" Yugo and CS is going to be to a nation who annexed their territories but I was simply speculating that these two government in exiles wouldn't have as much influence as Britain on the peace table, so I could imagine that Britain forces their hand to revise their borders to prevent future conflict.
The thing is that Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia were British allies, whereas Hungary wasn't and had illegally annexed large parts of those allies' territory. The Hungarian people certainly hoped that Trianon would be revised, but the only manner in which Britain could countenance that happening, the report argues, is with respect to Romania.

I think Britain still considered the USSR to be an ally of convenience at best, is the thing (the percentages agreement doesn't look like something that friends would do), so this seems more like the UK trying to figure out a way to get as much of southeast Europe sympathetic to them as possible.
 
The thing is that Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia were British allies, whereas Hungary wasn't and had illegally annexed large parts of those allies' territory. The Hungarian people certainly hoped that Trianon would be revised, but the only manner in which Britain could countenance that happening, the report argues, is with respect to Romania.

I think Britain still considered the USSR to be an ally of convenience at best, is the thing (the percentages agreement doesn't look like something that friends would do), so this seems more like the UK trying to figure out a way to get as much of southeast Europe sympathetic to them as possible.
It wasn't just the Hungarians who wished for a revised Trianon, Britain was aware that Trianon was a mistake. Its also worth noting that Britain essentially blind sided CS throughout the entire war, giving them up to the Soviets.

The passage below also has a bit of interpretation to this. "...the Czechoslovak Government would perhaps be ready, of its own will, to condede certain frontier recitifications in favour of Hungary..."
I find the bolded part to be interesting in that it feels like Britain was simply waiting and hoping for the CS government to concede without their intervention.
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The passage below also has a bit of interpretation to this. "...the Czechoslovak Government would perhaps be ready, of its own will, to condede certain frontier recitifications in favour of Hungary..."
I find the bolded part to be interesting in that it feels like Britain was simply waiting and hoping for the CS government to concede without their intervention.
Well, before the war, cs president Masaryk (and I think his succesor, Edvard Benes, too) was considering some territorial concession to Hungary. But that was before Munchen, Vienna arbitrage and war...
 
Directly after the sentence you're quoting mentions that "as regards Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, . . . hope that sympathetic considerations will be given to some revisions of the Trianon frontiers."

Yes, because the sentence is referring to the Foreign Office document stating that the Hungarians are hoping that sympathetic considerations will be given (which is to be expected of course!). It is not the Foreign Office hoping that sympathetic consideration will be given to the revision of Trianon frontiers. The full sentence states that the Foreign Office's position as outlined in the document is that there should be a return to Trianon frontiers immediately precisely because the Hungarians hoped for revisions. Basically they are saying that they advocate returning to the Trianon borders right away so that the Hungarians won't think that there is any possibility of revisions to the borders.
 
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It wasn't just the Hungarians who wished for a revised Trianon, Britain was aware that Trianon was a mistake. Its also worth noting that Britain essentially blind sided CS throughout the entire war, giving them up to the Soviets.

The passage below also has a bit of interpretation to this. "...the Czechoslovak Government would perhaps be ready, of its own will, to condede certain frontier recitifications in favour of Hungary..."
I find the bolded part to be interesting in that it feels like Britain was simply waiting and hoping for the CS government to concede without their intervention.
View attachment 594011

I don't think this means what you think it means.

Basically it says 3 things:

1. the British were aware that even the anti-German forces in Hungary were opposed to the return to Trianon. Thus even though it was their Foreign Office's position to return to those borders, it would be a mistake at the time to publicly announce this ----> the implication being that this might turn the anti-German Hungarian forces into anti-Allied Hungarian forces.

2. HMG was considering the possibility that the Czechoslovak government might be willing to do border rectifications. This is a neutral statement. It doesn't advocate for or against border rectifications but merely notes that the British government was trying to look at all possible post-war outcomes by other actors.

3. The last bit in the quoted image (which is left unfinished) would seem to suggest that the general policy is that the German satellites should restore to Allied countries territories they occupied generally. The rest of the quote would be needed to be sure.
 
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Asking again, did Germany intend to colonize and then annex Reichskomissariat Turkestan in the long-term, or make it a satellite state? I assumed that they would opt for the latter, as much as how they would most likely allow some countries in the Caucasus to become semi-independent to act as buffer states against Turkey.
 
I don't know if it really fits into this category and I don't know if it has been done before, but it could be interesting to do the Jesuit missions in Paraguay. The link above leads to a map that I have not been able to put on the site.
I wonder if anyone would be interested in doing it in Worlda format.
Uh, the Guairá and Chiquitos mission complexes are mistakenly swapped.
Very interesting, however. Really puts in perspective the scope of these missionary entities, and also disproves the possible notion that these areas were too wild to sustain an advanced society...
 

Apparently Germany made plans to try and attempt a naval invasion of the US to get concessions from the Americans. Three plans were made, the first, drawn up in 1897, was to destroy shipyards on the coast of Virginia so that Germany could supposedly establish colonies in the Caribbean and the Pacific without the US intervening. The other two, drawn up in 1899 and 1901, were actually to try and land troops on Cape Cod in Massachusetts and on Sandy Hook in New Jersey to shell Boston and New York, respectively, to force the US to relinquish Cuba and Puerto Rico so the Germans could build naval bases on the islands and threaten the Panama Canal. These plans really show how overconfident the German leadership was of their military abilities before the first World War
 
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