Proposals and War Aims That Didn't Happen Map Thread

Maybe "Arizuma" was the result of a cross between Arizona and Montezuma? I know Montezuma was the proposed name for a state encompassing the entire New Mexico Territory, which at the time still included Arizona, southern Nevada, and southeastern Colorado, yet the Gadsden purchase hadn't yet happened, so modern Arizona south of the Gila River wouldn't have been part of Montezuma
Or perhaps it referred to the Zuma people?

 
“Population center” would be somewhat less back then. Given the curving the proposed border shows whenever there is a population on both sides of the line, I assume it is partially going by a river boundary at some point, or splitting the communities as best it can without actually slicing specific ones in two. Odd that Nevada, according to this, was apparently claiming parts of California, despite it already being a state.
"Population cluster" might have been a better term perhaps.
I'm eye-balling it admittedly, it looks like it follows the Bear River south from the 42nd Parallel North, crosses the Great Salt Lake, and then follows the western boundary of Salt Lake and Utah counties, and then a meridian line.

I was having a look over the House of Representative bills for 1860 to check as @Iserlohn suggested and found that the eastern border of California was only set that year in
H. R. 706. Also, bills H. R. 707 through 712 have not been digitised, so I couldn't confirm any of those.
 
Oh, additionally, the Jefferson Territory:
1595577641197.png

(the white outline is because it was, at least according to Omniatlas, a semi-independent government)

Also:
Maybe "Arizuma" was the result of a cross between Arizona and Montezuma? I know Montezuma was the proposed name for a state encompassing the entire New Mexico Territory, which at the time still included Arizona, southern Nevada, and southeastern Colorado, yet the Gadsden purchase hadn't yet happened, so modern Arizona south of the Gila River wouldn't have been part of Montezuma
Apparently, arizuma is Nahuatl for "silver-bearing" -- that's probably where it came from.
 
Apparently, arizuma is Nahuatl for "silver-bearing" -- that's probably where it came from.
Unfortunately, that's a folk etymology – Classical Nahuatl at least doesn't have an r sound of any kind, and its word for silver is "iztāc teōcuitlatl" (which has the fun literal translation of "white god-excrement").
 
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Kind of a pity from a map mapmaking perspective we didn't get Colorado (OTL southern California) and Jefferson (OTL Colorado)
Real pity, because in OTL Los Angeles is one of the biggest cities in the world, and having it as the capital of Colorado would make it one of the richest states in the country.
 
Real pity, because in OTL Los Angeles is one of the biggest cities in the world, and having it as the capital of Colorado would make it one of the richest states in the country.
Well who knows how LA would have evolved if southern California had become an alt-Colorado? would this *Colorado have been a slave state or territory given it fell below the free/slave line? I have little doubt LA would have gone on to become a major city and port as in OTL, but perhaps it might have evolved a bit differently. Who knows it might even have been bigger and more important than in OTL!
 
Using the proposed Nevada and adding in the proposed Colorado (southern California):

1595805178032.png


and with proposed Colorado as fully envisioned at expense of some of proposed Nevada:

1595805165454.png


and the combination of the proposed Nevada, proposed Jefferson (with original eastern boundary in red), proposed *Colorado, proposed Arizona and complete partition of Utah:


1595805143339.png



EDIT: Shifted the border of *Colorado slightly north in keeping with this map from earlier in the thread (which I found using the Index post by @Drex - perhaps we should make a new index post or can help Drex update the old one?)
 

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(snip)
Supposedly some proposals for western states. Maybe someone could do some digging to find the listed house bills to check for accuracy.

Source from Twitter
I'll have to look into the House bills, but Nevada's borders look suspiciously close to their current ones for 1860. When Nevada became a state in 1864, it was missing the easternmost and southernmost parts (map). Those weren't added on until 1866 and 1867 respectively, in response to then-recent gold/silver discoveries.

Odd that Nevada, according to this, was apparently claiming parts of California, despite it already being a state.
Yeah, there were a lot of misunderstandings about where exactly CA's eastern border was early on. Nevada even organized a county that was mostly in what's now California (initially called Lake County, then Roop County), which led to armed conflict over control of the Susanville area.

In this map, it looks like they set the boundary at the crest of the Sierra Nevada. I have to admit, that makes good sense to me.
 
Using the proposed Nevada and adding in the proposed Colorado (southern California):

View attachment 569055

and with proposed Colorado as fully envisioned at expense of some of proposed Nevada:

View attachment 569056

and the combination of the proposed Nevada, proposed Jefferson (with original eastern boundary in red), proposed *Colorado, proposed Arizona and complete partition of Utah:


View attachment 569066
Does that proposed Nevada include the Goose Lake Basin or not? That basin does occasionally connect to the Sacramento River rather than being an actual part of the Great Basin.
 
Does that proposed Nevada include the Goose Lake Basin or not? That basin does occasionally connect to the Sacramento River rather than being an actual part of the Great Basin.
Yes, it looks like it does.

Edit: Continuing in the vein of different U.S. state divisions:
This page is a really useful source of info on California split proposals. In particular, the fifth link under "Maps" has a good summary of historic proposals (along with, of course, maps).
 
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Edit: Salt Lake City would be placed in Jefferson. Now, another topic. Was splitting Mormon-inhabited areas between Nevada and Jefferson made to diminish the political powers of the Mormons?
According to the article @Chris S posted, that was exactly the point:

The partitioning proposals aimed to divide the fifty thousand Mormons in half, so they would be the minority in each of the new mining-dominated territories. In defending his proposal, McClernand stated that once they had been stripped of political power, "they would probably pass out of our jurisdiction into Mexico or the British territories [Canada]."

Edit: Continuing in the vein of different U.S. state divisions:
I was gonna post that myself, but you beat me to it. Really great resource. It even has scanned copies of some original handwritten (!) bills from the 1800s.
 
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