Adrian VI was the only Dutchman to ever become Pope, as well as the last non-Italian to be elected to the post until John Paul II four and a half centuries later. Wikipedia says he had some reformist ideas (but doesn't explain what said ideas were like) and that his proposals were hampered by opposition from the rest of the clergy and his early death after serving as Pope for only one year.

So what if he lived until, say, 1528? Could this affect the Protestant Reformation somehow, and who would be the most likely candidate to succeed him? Would Rome still be sacked in 1527?

Finally, Adrian's OTL successor was Giulio de' Medici (Clement VII), who before his election was lord of Florence. How could Florentine politics be affected by him ruling the city for longer?
 
Yeah, I don't see Adrian becoming an enemy of Charles like Clement VII did.
This just reminded me of something, In OTL Henri II was married to Catherine de Medici in a plot by Francis I and Clement VII to invade Milan and make the couple the ruler of Milan (or at least that's how I understand it), so that marriage might be butterflied here, meaning Henri II can marry 'higher'.
 
This just reminded me of something, In OTL Henri II was married to Catherine de Medici in a plot by Francis I and Clement VII to invade Milan and make the couple the ruler of Milan (or at least that's how I understand it), so that marriage might be butterflied here, meaning Henri II can marry 'higher'.
Huh, now I'm wondering if the House of Medici could get a credible claim to Milan if the plan succeeded. Who do you think Catherine could marry if Henri gets with someone else?
 
Huh, now I'm wondering if the House of Medici could get a credible claim to Milan if the plan succeeded. Who do you think Catherine could marry if Henri gets with someone else?
Hmm, maybe. They could marry a daughter of Renée of France, and use the claim she has from her Father to claim the Duchy. Or maybe marry a scion of the Sforza dynasty and use their claim. As for Catherine de Medici she probably marries some Italian nobleman, though her Wikipedia claims she was considered as a bride for James V, so she could marry him.
 
Adrian VI was the only Dutchman to ever become Pope, as well as the last non-Italian to be elected to the post until John Paul II four and a half centuries later. Wikipedia says he had some reformist ideas (but doesn't explain what said ideas were like) and that his proposals were hampered by opposition from the rest of the clergy and his early death after serving as Pope for only one year.

So what if he lived until, say, 1528? Could this affect the Protestant Reformation somehow, and who would be the most likely candidate to succeed him? Would Rome still be sacked in 1527?

Finally, Adrian's OTL successor was Giulio de' Medici (Clement VII), who before his election was lord of Florence. How could Florentine politics be affected by him ruling the city for longer?
From a brief reading, Adrian was indeed a reformer, but his ideas were limited to a pure life for the clergy and fight against simony. This is of course a good way to start, and later he adhered to Erasmus' ideas (even invited the latter to Rome to write an extensive rebuttal to the Luteran doctrine). On the whole, his brief tenure was marked by the lack of success, but I doubt he could do much better: he lacked the support and the spine (he was anything but resolute, and he did not show particular diplomatic skills). As for Clement, although he seems to me the best option availble as ruler of Florence, I doubt he woul have stuck to that: hi sreal aspration was in Rome, and he would have tried to become pope at the first occasion. He was also the mastermind behind Adrian's election. I am starting to think that the ebest scenario here is to delay Leo X's death until the sitation in Italy is consolidated a bit: IIRC the Papal army had just entered Milan and Parma and Piacenza had just been taken back.
 
From a brief reading, Adrian was indeed a reformer, but his ideas were limited to a pure life for the clergy and fight against simony. This is of course a good way to start, and later he adhered to Erasmus' ideas (even invited the latter to Rome to write an extensive rebuttal to the Luteran doctrine). On the whole, his brief tenure was marked by the lack of success, but I doubt he could do much better: he lacked the support and the spine (he was anything but resolute, and he did not show particular diplomatic skills). As for Clement, although he seems to me the best option availble as ruler of Florence, I doubt he woul have stuck to that: hi sreal aspration was in Rome, and he would have tried to become pope at the first occasion. He was also the mastermind behind Adrian's election. I am starting to think that the ebest scenario here is to delay Leo X's death until the sitation in Italy is consolidated a bit: IIRC the Papal army had just entered Milan and Parma and Piacenza had just been taken back.
Could he call something like the Council of Trent 20 years earlier?
 
Could he call something like the Council of Trent 20 years earlier?
Adrian? In all honesty, I do not think so. The only possibility is to have him paired with a stronger partner, but I have no idea on whom we may choose. This is based on his OTL endeavors: when he was sort of a Regent for Charles in his Spanish domains, he did well because he had the help and the protection of Cardinal Ximenes (who was also likeminded in the need for internal reforms in the Church, but died in 1517); during the Comuneros revolt, he had the help of Inigo Velasco, the energic Castillan constable. The latter was an intuition by Charles V, so maybe if Adrian lives longer, the Emperor might try and pull a similar trick. If this is paired with the shadowing of Giulio de Medici at the Papal Curia, then maybe the latter (who was pushed to the ecclesiastical career) might even quit as a Cardinal and step in as ruler of an enlarged Florence.
 
Could he call something like the Council of Trent 20 years earlier?
Personally, i think there are good reasons to assume this really could happen. He had no personal problem with calling a council, as he wasn't really power hungry. See how he was elected. Secondly, he would have listened to Charles V, who did want a council early on. But it must also be said that he didn't really saw the problems the Church faced in Germany as demonstrated by his instruction to his representative at the diet at Nuremberg. He admitted to problems at the top, not to those in Germany itself. He might learn though.
 
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