Pop Culture Timelines Go-To Thread

Yep, that's what I had in mind. Thanks for clearing that up.
You're welcome.
Disney+ would definitely have a Jetix hub in Europe, since that brand was traditionally very strong over there. Maybe in Latin America as well, and in Asian countries.
That should be obvious.
That would be a somewhat different reboot. As far as I can tell, countries where Disney Ducks comics have a strong following tended to be kind of lukewarm on 2017 reboot, despite (or maybe even because) the very obvious and very large amount of inspiration from the various comics.
Either way, it could be a good fit for the show.
Disney Television Animation Europe sounds good to me.
Thanks!
Actually, I've had a bit of a problem with all these brainstormings we had in this thread. See, Disney X.D. ended up the spiritual successor to Jetix in some ways, and with the logic that Toon Disney is out and Disney X.D. is in, we have the Disney Channel, Disney X.D. and Jetix. Wouldn't this be spreading oneself too thin in terms of greedy corporate mindset? And does Disney X.D. get to exist outside the United States. Going by Wikipedia, Disney X.D. was to be a bit of a different beast from Jetix:
How about we have Disney Channel focus more on live-action of the teen sitcom variety, Disney X.D. brings all the comedy-based cartoons to that channel, and Jetix is where the action-adventure cartoons reside? For example, we could have Hannah Montana and That's So Raven at 7 and 7:30 on Disney Channel, Kim Possible and W.I.T.C.H. then and there on Jetix, and a full hour of Disney's classic cartoons at 7-8 on Disney X.D. Sounds good for keeping the three channels all alive?

Oh, and to hopefully set the detractors free, Jetix would be the boys channel, Disney Channel would focus more on girls, and Disney X.D. would target the most towards both genders simultaneously.
With a still operating Jetix, Disney X.D. sure will turn out a lot differently.
True, very true.
Also, while we're at it, could we throw in a bit of a different path for 4Kids (with the "love triangle" and all)? Towards the end of its life, they were trying to salvage their reputation by openly referring to some of their shows as anime. Who's up for a 4Kids redemption arc?
I think they can stay the same, for all things considered.
 
How about we have Disney Channel focus more on live-action of the teen sitcom variety, Disney X.D. brings all the comedy-based cartoons to that channel, and Jetix is where the action-adventure cartoons reside? For example, we could have Hannah Montana and That's So Raven at 7 and 7:30 on Disney Channel, Kim Possible and W.I.T.C.H. then and there on Jetix, and a full hour of Disney's classic cartoons at 7-8 on Disney X.D. Sounds good for keeping the three channels all alive?

Oh, and to hopefully set the detractors free, Jetix would be the boys channel, Disney Channel would focus more on girls, and Disney X.D. would target the most towards both genders simultaneously.
That's pretty reasonable, actually. Come to think of it, there's a good number of animated shows made for Disney X.D. that could fit this ATL version of Jetix very well. Tron: Uprising and Motorcity are the two shows that come to mind, maybe they'd have a better run on Jetix? Both were canceled because they didn't fit the Disney label.

Probably should work out a timeline out of this.
 
That's pretty reasonable, actually. Come to think of it, there's a good number of animated shows made for Disney X.D. that could fit this ATL version of Jetix very well. Tron: Uprising and Motorcity are the two shows that come to mind, maybe they'd have a better run on Jetix? Both were canceled because they didn't fit the Disney label.
Not to mention Randy Cunningham: 9th Grade Ninja and Penn Zero: Part-Time Hero.
Probably should work out a timeline out of this.
I 500% agree with this.
 
I got a half-formed idea in my head for a timeline where Viacom ends up buying Marvel due to working with them on Iron Man and other early MCU films, but I’m not 100% confident in my ability/time for a full timeline thread yet. Or how to make it plausible, for that matter.

E: A few of my rough ideas so far
Already this would likely butterfly away them buying the TMNT.

Possible effects: Viacom seems more willing to play ball with weird cross-studio stuff sometimes (at least as far as there being weird TMNT and SpongeBob crossovers), so possibly Spider-Man, X-Men, Fantastic Four, etc. in the MCU earlier somehow.

Disney may do what they did the last time they saw some superhero media get highly successful (Batman: the Animated Series and X-Men) and bring in Gargoyles. Greg Weismann may come back and help helm either a revived TV series (probably butterflying away Young Justice somewhat, unless that’s still plausible) or even helping with a series of movies based on the show.

George Lucas may or may not still sell Star Wars/LucasFilm to Disney. I’ve half-thought of it being sold to Warner Bros. instead, but I don’t know if that’s really plausible, either.
 
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I got a half-formed idea in my head for a timeline where Viacom ends up buying Marvel due to working with them on Iron Man and other early MCU films, but I’m not 100% confident in my ability/time for a full timeline thread yet. Or how to make it plausible, for that matter.

E: A few of my rough ideas so far
Already this would likely butterfly away them buying the TMNT.
Idea: Disney buys the TMNT instead of Viacom, and has Greg Weisman as the showrunner.
Possible effects: Viacom seems more willing to play ball with weird cross-studio stuff sometimes (at least as far as there being weird TMNT and SpongeBob crossovers), so possibly Spider-Man, X-Men, Fantastic Four, etc. in the MCU earlier somehow.
Would this mean we could see a humanized Spongebob in one of the Splatoon games?
Disney may do what they did the last time they saw some superhero media get highly successful (Batman: the Animated Series and X-Men) and bring in Gargoyles. Greg Weismann may come back and help helm either a revived TV series (probably butterflying away Young Justice somewhat, unless that’s still plausible) or even helping with a series of movies based on the show.
Either that, or we get that cancelled Maximum Horsepower show made into a reality.
George Lucas may or may not still sell Star Wars/LucasFilm to Disney. I’ve half-thought of it being sold to Warner Bros. instead, but I don’t know if that’s really plausible, either.
I mean, since Star Wars aired on Cartoon Network in two different forms, I think Warner Bros. could purchase Lucasfilm.
 
Disney may do what they did the last time they saw some superhero media get highly successful (Batman: the Animated Series and X-Men) and bring in Gargoyles. Greg Weismann may come back and help helm either a revived TV series (probably butterflying away Young Justice somewhat, unless that’s still plausible) or even helping with a series of movies based on the show.
I may have an idea for that as well Disney goes into a licensing deal with Warner bros and purchase DC
 
I may have an idea for that as well Disney goes into a licensing deal with Warner bros and purchase DC
DC is not for sale, no matter how desperate AT&T is, the license is very valuable for warnermedia itself. Maybe Disney would do something with gen13 that they bought and never used it
 
DC is not for sale, no matter how desperate AT&T is, the license is very valuable for warnermedia itself. Maybe Disney would do something with gen13 that they bought and never used it
What I mean about my idea is pre Superman the movie Disney buys distribution rights and thus also purchases DC comics in 1990
 
What I mean about my idea is pre Superman the movie Disney buys distribution rights and thus also purchases DC comics in 1990
Warner already owned DC since their National Media years, is ain't marvel, DC and Warner have been more together that what they've been separately, that make zero sense, Superman Movie was fully Done In-house in that regard.
 
Looking up some pop culture info of the 70s, but noticed a disturbing point about Led Zeppelin's 1977 North American tour. Among the tour's problems, before it was cut short by Karac Plant's tragic death, was a riot in Cincinnati as around 1000 people tried to break into the Riverfront Coliseum and get into the festival seating (despite their not having tickets).

Despite the riot, Cincinnati still allowed festival seating... until the death of 11 teenagers and adults at The Who concert of Dec. 3, 1979. Which happened at the very same stadium as the Led Zeppelin riot, almost three years previously.

It's probably not enough for its own AH, but just consider if you're doing a 1970s timeline... what if Cincinnati had banned festival seating because of the 1977 riot?
 
DUNA ("Dune")

Directed by: Martin Hollý Jr.
Produced by: Slovenská filmová tvorba Bratislava (Czechoslovakia), Taurus Film, Omnia Film (Federal Republic of Germany)
Country of origin: Slovakia (partly co-produced with production companies from the Federal Republic of Germany)
Based on the novel by: Frank Herbert
Pre-production phase: 1981-1982
Filming: June 1982 - November 1983
Post-production: December 1983 - May 1984
Released: 10 June 1984

Cast:
Vladimír Hajdu as Paul Atreides
Jozef Adamovič as duke Leto Atreides
Soňa Valentová as lady Jessica Atreides
Jozef Kroner as Gurney Halleck
Elo Romančík as Thufir Hawat
Juraj Kukura as Dr. Wellington Yueh
Milan Kňažko as Duncan Idaho
Anna Grissová as shadout Mapes
Pavol Mikulík as Dr. Liet Kynes
Marián Geišberg as Stilgar
Petra Vančíková as Chani Kynes
Vlado Černý as Jamis
Kamila Magálová as Harah
Boris Farkaš as Otheym
Ľubomír Paulovič as Korba
Vilma Jamnická as Rammallo
Juraj Slezáček as Esmar Tuek
Marek Ťapák as Staban Tuek
Vladimír Müller as baron Vladimir Harkonnen
Andrej Hryc as Glossu-Rabban Harkonnen
Andrej Kraus as Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen
Ivan Mistrík as Piter de Vries
Viera Strnisková as Gaius Helen Mohiam
Emil Horváth Jr. as count Hasimir Fenring
Ladislav Chudík as padishah-emperor Shaddam IV of House Corrino
Jana Nagyová as princess Irulan Corrino
Helena Krajčiová as Alia Atreides
Leopold Haverl as a Spacing Guild representative
and Peter Rúfus as filmbook records voiceover

Filming locations:
- Koliba Film Studios (most of the interiors, including in sietches, Arrakeen and various palaces)
- Šranecké piesky in Záhorie (near Lakšárska Nová Ves, various Arrakis exteriors)
- several Slovak quarries (Dargov, Brekov and Nižný Hrabovec, rocky Arrakis exteriors)
- Súľovské skaly, Veľký Rozsutec, Bukovské vrchy, Tatra mountain lakes (exterior footage representing Caladan)
- Polish Baltic coastline (exterior footage representing the coastlines of Caladan)
- arboretum in Mlyňany, arboretum in Borová Hora (grounds of Castle Caladan)
- Orava Castle (some interiors of Castle Caladan)
- Košice Botanical Gardens (interior scenes of the Arrakeen Palace greenhouse)
- Wadi Rum desert in Jordan (Arrakis exterior shots, main desert filming locations)
- deserts in Uzbekistan (Arrakis exterior shots, main desert filming locations)

Directors of photography: Stanislav Szomolányi and Jozef Šimončič
Music: Svetozár Stračina (orchestral themes), Marián Varga and Collegium Musicum (electronic ambients and electric guitar ambients)
Set design: Viliam Ján Gruska (sources of inspiration included the facade of Petra in Jordan, Brhlovce tuffhouses in south Slovakia and vernacular architecture from various cultures of the Middle East, Europe and other parts of the world)

Special effects and production design:
Most of the effects were achieved either as practical miniatures or in-camera. Very few opticals were used in the film, as it was deemed both a bit too costly and likely unconvincing compared to foreign productions. Director Martin Hollý was adamant that rear-projection, especially in flying sequences, would look too antiquated, and he equally dismissed ideas about combining live-action shots with optical background effects. The sandworms, spice harvesters, spaceship scenes (in space, with planets, and landing sequences, etc.) were all done with miniatures and miniature environments. The West German production team collaborated in the making of the miniatures sequences.

For the ornithopters, a combination of techniques was used, including non-functional exterior mockups, two different interior mock-up modifications to a loaned helicopter's cockpit, and most importantly, exterior wide shots and close-up shots of remote-controlled miniatures (portraying the fast wing-flapping of the ornithopters, with highly detailed miniature figures seated in the cockpits). Aerial flyby footage of the desert was filmed from smaller loaned helicopters. Cockpit interior shots, with actors in costume, were filmed directly in the slightly mocked-up cockpit of a loaned Alouette III helicopter (refurbished several times to portray different ornithopter interiors). With appropriate cutting, this mix of techniques helped create a relatively seemless illussion of characters boarding thopters, the thopters taking off, characters sitting inside and flying over the desert terrain (since all the footage was authentic, shot in the cockpit of a moving helicopter), then a thopter landing and the characters disembarking. All of the outside shots of the thopters were depicted by the remote-controlled models. To provide visual consistency, the design of these miniatures included a front cockpit area very similar to that of a real Alouette III helicopter. A different sound foley was created for the thopters in audio post-production and the actors from the cockpit scenes redid their lines in ADR.

A few of the most often used stillsuit costumes (for the main characters) had a genuine if rudimentary water circulation system built into them (consisting of thin tubes within the costumes). This was developed to cool down the actors during desert shoots abroad and the domestic shoots in the scorching sun at the height of a Slovak summer. Most of the background stillsuit costumes for extras were non-functional costumes, as they were needed only for shorter-duration shoots.

The sequences of Paul's hallucinatory visions were achieved through live-action scenes, camera filters and some minor optical effects.
Virtually the only optical effect to combine real live-action shots with fictional objects were night time shots of the two moons of Arrakis, seen in the planet's night time sky. This was director Hollý's only concession to his "no background optical effects rule".

After some pre-production difficulty, the Eyes of Ibad seen among the Fremen were deemed to be too finnicky to achieve through optical effects or airbrushing. The production design team looked into ordering specially modified contact lenses that could depict the blue-in-blue appearance of the Fremen eyes relatively convincingly. Czechoslovakia invented modern eye contact lenses, so existing Czech expertise in their manufacturing came in handy. Even though the final version of lenses used wasn't entirely perfect, they achieved the look described in the novel, without creating any weird reflections or visual glitches in the camera footage.

All of the sietch interior scenes and the vast majority of public building and palace interior scenes were filmed on soundstages at Koliba Film Studios in Bratislava. One larger soundstage was also reserved for a detailed set used for street scenes of Arrakeen. Besides the location shooting abroad, many of the smaller-scale exterior scenes that didn't require more convincing desert environments were filmed in Slovakia, utilising several quarries with desert-coloured cliffs and even the Šranecké piesky area in Záhorie, Slovakia's only and tiny sandy "desert". These areas were also useful for pick-ups and additional shots for miniature sequences, especially those that required shooting under an open sky. The crew could not film pick-ups abroad, as the budget was too tight for return visits, so all the material shot abroad had to be filmed on schedule. To ensure that no pick-ups were needed, the director and script writers placed a great emphasis on getting the foreign-filmed sequences right in the final version of the script, as they couldn't afford to do any major changes.

Most prop crysknives were made of harder foam material, to prevent stabbing accidents during simulated fights. A few "hero" crysknife props were made of hardier material, carved carefully and smoothly from wood. Both the foam and wooden crysknife props were extensively dyed, textured and weathered to appear as naturalistic as possible, as if they really were made from the teeth of sandworms. The fictional uniforms of the house troopers were based on a variety of historical sources of inspiration, with WWI and 1920s uniforms being the most prominent. The armour worn by some soldiers and guards (including those of the Atreides) was designed using modified pieces from replica historical armour and discarded surplus riot gear (previously issued to riot police). Costume and armour designers developed a "part-medieval, part-modern" appearance to the armour, trying to blend the design elements together to create something timeless, befitting the atmosphere of Dune's setting. The cold steel melee weapons for the film were loaned historical replicas or even genuine antique pieces, the vast majority already used in prior film productions. Director Hollý and the script writers had the prop masters and armourers choose weapons that evoked several different eras and regions, including medieval replica daggers and shortswords, Middle Eastern knives, daggers and short sabres, kindjal daggers from the Caucasus, WWI era military kindjals, 19th century and WWI era pioneer hangers and fighting knives.

The depiction of personal shields in the film represented some of the few regularly reappearing, but subtle optical effects. The shields were portrayed as completely invisible, their presence signalled only by a subtle buzzing sound and tiny lit control lights on the shield generator props (worn on the belt or on the forearm). Whenever a blade started hitting a shield, a cooler-coloured, whitish gleam started subtly enwrapping the blade, and when a blade managed to penetrate, it developed a warmer-coloured glow, almost as if being heated in a forge. Hollý, averse to using opticals, only approved of some subtle use of visual colour-tinting on the blades, worried that the lack of visual cues might make the fights seem unconvincing.

The Guild Navigators were deemed too expensive and unnecessary to depict in full, whether through puppetry or make-up. Instead, some of the prop and effects developers created a mechanically controlled prop of a webbed, alien-looking hand of a Navigator. This was then filmed in a close-up from the side, moving while its owner is floating inside a tank filled with spice gas. Sound effects of strange breathing were added. In this same short scene, not even half a minute long, we also see into the room beyond the glass of the tank. Leopold Haverl's character of a seasoned Guild member approaches, followed by a startled young Guild novice. The novice is gazing at the spice tank with the Navigator, his mouth slightly agap, implying he is shocked by the former human's appearance (and wasn't expecting to be this surprised).

The film broke the then-existing Slovak film record for most stuntmen on screen, as well as the number of stuntmen taking part in a single shoot. Dune was also one of the most expensive non-historical and non-fantasy films produced by Slovakia up to that point, though it didn't break any budget records.

The distinct and somewhat unusual sound of the baliset was created as a sound mix of cither, lute and electric guitar sound elements. Jozef Kroner memorized the finger moves for the baliset prop, but mimed all his scenes of Gurney Halleck playing the instrument (similarly to some of his previous roles in two different early 80s Slovak fantasy films). Composer Svetozár Stračina lobbied to include elements of a lute in the sound mix for the baliset, arguing that the lute is not only a medieval European instrument (fitting the neo-feudal setting) but also descends from the very similar Middle Eastern oud. The lute/oud element would musically unite the European and Middle Eastern cultural elements of Dune's fictional universe.

After 1990, Hollý and several talents from the film's production design team admitted that one book they secretly bought and smuggled in from abroad was a 1978 illustrated edition of Herbert's Dune, with black-and-white and colour illustrations by John Schoenherr. Though Hollý and the film crew wanted to provide their own vision for the film, they had heard about Schoenherr's clout as THE illustrator of the Dune series, and once learning he had created an illustrated edition only a few years ago, sought to acquire a copy. While they wouldn't directly copy Schoenherr's depictions, they would use them as a guideline for the designs in the film, as well as the film's atmosphere. Until well into the 1990s, the film crew's copy of The Illustrated Dune was the sole specimen in the entirety of Czechoslovakia.

The saga of Dune is far from over... (Continued in Part 2)
 
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Sherlock Holmes (Slovak TV series, early 1990s) - a compiled repost of my old post here and my old post here

A Slovak Sherlock Holmes ?!
A short hypotehtical write-up of a late 1980s or early 1990s Slovak TV series based on Holmes. Let's just say someone saw the slightly older Soviet series with Livanov and co., and thought "Hey, we can do one too, maybe with more up to date filming tech where needed, etc.", so public TV eventually greenlit a Slovak attempt at a Holmesian series.

Summary of my casting ideas so far for the hypothetical early 1990s Slovak series:


I've included links to late 80s and early 90s photos of the actors and actresses, to give you a bit of an idea. (Martin Huba's 'stache is rather iconic, but I think he'd look good as a clean-shaven Holmes. At least it would be something different to his usual facial appearance.) Mary Morstan (later Watson) is introduced in The Sign of the Four, per canon.

Examples of other actors and actresses cast in guest roles in various episodes (presented in no particular order):


Also featuring: Stano Dančiak, Dušan Szabó, Zita Furková, Marián Slovák, František Kovár, Viera Strnisková, Oldo Hlaváček, Emil Horvát Jr., Maroš Kramár, Anna Javorková, Július Satinský, Elo Romančík, Emília Vášaryová, Leopold Haverl, maybe a smaller role for Jozef Kroner, and many, many others.

As there are 16 episodes, each needs a unique cast of its own, consisting of both better-known and lesser-known, as well as younger and older actors and actresses.

Production
As the first proper TV series adaptaton of Holmes in the country, it had to adopt a more conservative approach to the storytelling. Most of the episodes would be a lot of the "greatest hits" cases from the Canon. (I'll provide a list of adapted episodes once I make my write-up.)

One of the biggest stumbling blocks would be that you'd have to fake a lot of the Victorian British scenery. I bet a lot of filming would be done on convincing soundstages (we rarely tended to use dedicated backlots, it was expensive for most productions) and you could redress some historical quarters of Slovak cities to create an illussion of late 1800s London, but it would be still somewhat tricky. Some of the better maintained and restored manor houses around the country could be disguised pretty well for British stuff, with a bit of creativity. (I think this is an issue in and of itself, as prior to the 1990s, plenty of historical architecture didn't receive the adequate maintenance it should have and it looks a lot better now than it has looked since at least the early 20th century. But even so, you could still use a lot of real backdrops well, provided you know what you're doing with your takes and later editing.) I am betting some props would need to be built for the series, like one or two Hansom cabs, bobby hats for the local policemen, some of the more British style 1800s furniture, and so on, but it could work well enough.

Due to production limitations, stories featuring the seaside would not be adapted. (You could use a small backlot and stock footage to give the illussion of a seaside, but I think they'd prefer to avoid wasting time with that, on the off-chance it would look unconvincing.) Ironically, I think doing The Final Problem scenes set at the Reichenbach Falls would be a lot easier, as we have several impressive waterfalls in parts of the country that could double as the Alps. I even know of an exact mountain lodge that could double for the lodge Holmes and Watson are staying at while on the run from Moriarty. There are a few places in the country that could pass for fens and moors as well, so you could do The Hound too.
 
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Arrakis... Dune... Desert planet... Sole source of the spice melange in the entire universe... A place of strife, power struggles, fanaticism, and revolutions devouring their own children. (Continued from Part 1)

----

Frank Herbert gradually got wind of the nothing-short-of-daring Slovak adaptation of Dune during the second half of 1984. The film was mostly kept under wraps outside of central Europe until very late before the premiere, so it took a while for word-of-mouth to spread on the western side of the European Iron Curtain, and even a bit longer to reach North American science fiction circles.

Dune was actually somewhat hampered by legal rights issues even after its premiere, so much so that the film's crew became terrified Frank Herbert's letter to them would threaten to sue the whole production and any future sequels. Thankfully, it turned out that Frank reached out, genuinely curious about the film, as he had heard some buzz about the adaptation, but had no means to actually see it. Relieved, Hollý and the crew pulled some strings via the FRG production companies they co-produced the film with, and two or three copies of a special version with added English subtitles was sent overseas to the United States.

Herbert eventually wrote back, having carefully watched the film several times, even taking notes on later rewatches. To the crew's relief, he sounded surprisingly elated, and even promised to help with clearing up any legal issues with the Dune series' current publishers. Herbert confessed he not only enjoyed the adaptation, he was particularly fond of the attention payed to the script, the use of film language and acting subtlety instead of heavy-handed exposition, and the creators showing a clear grasp on the themes he wanted to explore in the novel. "I started watching your adaptation with low, tempered expectations, and I was in for a pleasant shock at how well your crew and cast have managed to recreate the novel, its atmosphere, story and themes, without resorting to oversimplifications or otherwise underestimating your viewers. Consider your adaptation a success !"

Frank Herbert made no secret he deeply dislikes communist, far-right or any other similar regimes, but he was very happy to see his novel found a strong resonance even in an overlooked Warsaw Pact country and inspired such a dedicated film-making effort. He even confessed that the mutual appreciation of art and narrative themes on both sides of the Iron Curtain gives him hope that the world might still become a more unifieid place in the future, at some point or another. Most importantly, besides help with sorting out the legal rights for the first film, Herbert also promised to help sort out the rights for the potential two sequels. (Personally, he thought it would be likely the most plausible to not continue after Children of Dune, feeling that the technology needed to adapt God Emperor of Dune wasn't there yet, and would be prohibitively expensive and inaccessible to modest Slovak film studios anyway.)

Correspondence between the film-makers and the writer continued until his death in 1986. Every few weeks or at least months, some mail arrived to Herbert or from Herbert, with the writer answering whenever he had time in-between writing Chapterhouse Dune and planning the seventh novel (the latter ultimately unfinished). Though the total correspondence wasn't numerically that large, it was still packed with information and insights by both sides. Nowadays, the correspondence is part of the archives of the Slovak Film Institute. Photocopies and digital scans of the original correspondence had also been created later and donated to the Herbert estate, and eventually even the Herbert fandom.

----

SPASITEĽ DUNY ("Dune Messiah")

Directed by: Martin Hollý Jr.
Produced by: Slovenská filmová tvorba Bratislava (Czechoslovakia), Taurus Film, Omnia Film (Federal Republic of Germany)
Country of origin: Slovakia (partly co-produced with production companies from the Federal Republic of Germany)
Based on the novel by: Frank Herbert
Pre-production phase: 1985-1986
Filming: September 1986 - February 1987
Post-production: February 1983 - August 1987
Released: 12 September 1987

Cast:
Vladimír Hajdu as Paul Atreides, known as Muad'Dib
Petra Vančíková as Chani Kynes
Milan Kňažko as Hayt / Duncan Idaho (ghola)
Marián Geišberg as Stilgar
Natália Hasprová as Alia Atreides
Jana Nagyová as princess Irulan Corrino
Boris Farkaš as Otheym
Zuzana Mauréry as Lichna / Scytale (Lichna impersonation)
Peter Bzdúch as Bijaz
Dušan Jamrich as Scytale ("real" form)
Vlado Černý as Scytale (Jamis impersonation)
Viera Strnisková as Gaius Helen Mohiam
Dušan Lenci as Guild Navigator Edric
Ľubomír Paulovič as Korba
Kamila Magálová as Harah
Soňa Valentová as lady Jessica Atreides (cameo)
Jozef Kroner as Gurney Halleck (cameo)
Jozef Adamovič as duke Leto Atreides (vision cameo)
Marek Ťapák as Staban Tuek
Leopold Haverl as a Spacing Guild representative
and Peter Rúfus as filmbook records voiceover

Directors of photography: Stanislav Szomolányi and Jozef Šimončič
Music: Svetozár Stračina (orchestral themes), Marián Varga and Collegium Musicum (electronic ambients and electric guitar ambients)
Set design: Viliam Ján Gruska

Special effects and production design:
Most of the effects in the second installment were a continuation of the tried-and-true effects from the sleeper hit that was the first film. The film crew and production designers of the original Dune film had the foresight of keeping all of the already completed effects assets that served them well during filming at home and abroad. This made the transition into adapting the sequel easier. As in the first film, optical effects were used minimally, with an emphasis on blended techniques using miniatures, on in-camera effects and other practical trickery.

One of the most elaborate and involved new effects was the full depiction of a Guild Navigator, specifically steersman Edric, one of the co-conspirators in the attempt to assassinate Paul Atreides. The production designers went through many different ideas and concepts before they started arriving at a conclusion on how to bring Edric to life. With computer generated imagery (CGI) being a complete novelty even west of the Iron Curtain, the only real avenues available for the Navigator character were either the development of an elaborate and detailed humanoid puppet, or the use of an actor in a detailed prosthetic suit. After a short while of exploring the puppet idea, it dawned on the production design crew and the director that even the best puppet they could create might seem a little too artificial and unconvincing. Particularly when it comes to depicting speech. The crew were worried they're at wits end, but after an evening of discussion between the production designers, prosthetic makers and the director, an inspired compromise was reached. Rather than use only one of the two methods, they'd attempt to combine the two.

Most of the body of the Navigator would be depicted by a detailed, remote-controlled puppet with concealed wires, but the face of Edric and all his expressions and speech would be portrayed by a real actor in a lifelike prosthetic mask ! Later into the final casting, after going through several potential portrayers, Dušan Lenci landed the role, in no small part thanks to his distinctive, thoughtful voice. Lenci was reported to proclaim, after having the completed prosthetic mask applied to his face and opening his eyes for the first time afterward, "My goodness ! So odd... You've really turned me into a peculiar fella...". Despite the actor's initial fears that he wouldn't be able to move his fake lips and eyelids convincingly, those elements of the mask were fine-tuned fairly quickly. In the meantime, the puppet was built, intended to be presented only from the front. The legs, arms and hands were remote-controlled via mechanical wires and small servos, and were designed to give the impression of floating in mid-air (to depict Edric's floating in a spice tank). Previous props went unwasted, with the crew improving the existing single prop-hand of the Navigator from the first film, then creating a right-hand copy of it with slightly different surface details, and integrating both hands into the new full-size puppet. Edric's body, though clothed in something like a hi-tech swimsuit with the emblem of the Guild, had a wrinkly, almost frog-like or toad-like skin texture and a more subdued colour pallete, inspired by various colour hues of the desert. The backside hidden via set design and forced perspective.

Behind the puppet was a concealed cubbyhole of sorts for the actor. Dušan Lenci later joked that getting into the cubbyhole was like entering a tiny sub or some deep-sea diving suit or spacesuit entered from the back. He voiced some worries about having to stand in the space behind the puppet for a longer while, so the crew built an improvised stool-like seat. Lenci once again joked years later, while recording his interviews for the behind the scenes documentaries for the remastered home video releases, that the way he sat comfy on a stool, in an elevated position within Edric's spice tank, made him feel like a bored monarch idly watching his lower-seated fellow actors. The interior of the spice tank was created by the use of colour-tinted see-through glass, colour-tinted backlit areas near the floor of the tank, and the use of dry ice plumes floating inside. The resulting image was that of Edric the Navigator floating inside a cylindrical tank filled with spice gas.

Due to the presence of a Tleilaxu spy in the story, the cunning Face Dancer known as Scytale, it was deemed necessary to use creative camera angles, concealment tricks and editing room cutting techniques to mostly hide the Face Dancer transformations. As a consequence, Scytale's transformations happened largelly off-screen. However, much as in the case of the mutated, merman-like Edric, Martin Hollý wanted to equally emphasize the strangeness of the Face Dancers, given their origin as bio-engineered humans. Between 1984 and Frank Herbert's eventual passing in 1986, fairly regular correspondence between the writer and the film crew continued, with Hollý having the foresight to ask what the neutral form of a Face Dancer's... well, face... would look like, if it was ever to be seen. Frank replied to the question by sharing his description from Heretics of Dune, released just recently in 1984 (in what would become one of many questions and answers in an impromptu FAQ for the film-makers). The crew needed no more encouragement. A one-off prosthetic mask was developed for Scytale's post-mortem face, based on the description from Heretics. It was a far less mobile prosthetic than the one made for Edric, as it didn't need to be used for speech, but still had a high level fo detail and polish.

Mr. Jamrich, the other of the two "prosthetic Dušan-s", as the crew grew to nickname the two actors, put on Scytale's mask for the brief shots of his dead face, and still considered the mask remarkably alienating and scary. (An film buff urban legend emerged in the 1990s about Jamrich suffering from nightmares after seeing himself in the prosthetic, but Jamrich denied this in the 2000s, after he had first heard of this claim.) In the finished film, Paul Atreides, aided by the timely intervention of Duncan Idaho and his own newborn son Leto II, outsmarts and kills Scytale, who threatened to murder his newborn children and tried to blackmail him to give into the demands of his masters, the feared Bene Tleilax. After Paul kills Scytale, saving little Leto and Ghanima, we witness a shot of Scytale's face, lying on the ground, mouth slightly agap. It has transformed from its usual form (portrayed directly by Dušan Jamrich) to a hideous, humanoid but semi-inhuman appearance (portrayed via the one-off prosthetic). A face right out of Herbert's description ! ("Almost chinless round faces, pug noses, tiny mouths, black button eyes, and short-cropped white hair that stood up from their heads like the bristles on a brush.")

Famously, in the entire scene prior to that, Scytale changes his appearance and voice several times. After he drops the guise of Otheym's daughter Lichna (whom he murdered), he uses his "standard" face for a while, but then briefly adopts the guise of Jamis, the Fremen Paul had killed in a duel in the first film, to mess with Paul's mind and deepen his guilt. For the brief scene, Vlado Černý reprised his appearance as Jamis, albeit actually portraying Scytale. The Face Dancer, reverting to his "standard" face and mocking Paul's mental torment, threatens to also change his face to that of Paul's father, Leto I, and denigrate Paul in order to break him mentally. Such a threat went ultimately unrealised before Paul quickly grasps at the opportunity he receives to kill Scytale. Though director Hollý wanted to show off the Face Dancer transformation trickery in the scene, he felt that including Leto I would overegg the scene, so the idea of having Jozef Adamovič as Leto I mocking Vladimír Hajdu as Paul was never filmed. However, Adamovič did reprise his role as Leto I in Paul's visions and dreams seen earlier in the film. (Other brief cameo appearances in the film included lady Jessica and Gurney on Caladan, pondering about how Paul is doing, and whether to visit him after the assassination attempt. These scenes were added to keep some continuity before the two characters' full reappearance in an eventual third film.)

Audiences in 1987 were fascinated by the first appearance of steersman Edric, as well as the later scene of Scytale's manipulative mind games and scary face after death. Mere seconds after Edric's haunting first impression, with the camera panning ominously and slowly from his webbed feet to his grotesque, half-fish, half-human face, filmgoers were treated to the character's first lines in Lenci's characteristic voice: "I do hope travelling to thisss... meeting was a worthwhile endeavour onnn... my part." (he trails off in thought for a few moments, staring elsewhere as if in a trance or talking out of a strange fever dream) "Wormhole slide uneventful, Holtzmann drive and all systems nominal, destination spectral class G2, target orbit of terrestrial crust type planetary destination, orbit insertion confirmed, gravity well comfortable for heighliner landing... Feelsss different... yessss. A quarter of an hour ago, Imperial Time Standard..." (he stops ennumerating and pays his co-conspirators attention once more) "...me and my brother-pilots have just folded space. From Ixxxx... Many... Strange. Many machines on Ix. Machines. Why ? Hmmm..." (he looks at Korba, then at Mohiam) "So, what is your plan ?"

When interviewed years later, Hollý and many of the production design crew elaborated on how people felt a little disappointed by the non-presence of more alien beings in the first film. Though the story of the novel limited any such appearances, Hollý fully intended to utilise the presence of Edric and Scytale in the visual worldbuilding of the second film. As Hollý himself put it "the writer didn't really include any human-like aliens in his book series, but in this far future it takes place in, there are a fair few humans who have, for lack of a better term, become aliens, via artificial means or their byproducts". Edric's strange, spaced-out-sounding style of speech during certain moments, was meant to remind the audience that Guild Navigators are not only physically mutated from constant exposure to spice, but their psychology is also shifted due to perceiving spacetime differently than humans not overdosed on and mutated by the spice. The Navigators are also "married to the job" and so attuned to the heighliners they pilot, the ship's sensors might as well be the steersmen's second set of senses, as familiar to them as those of their physical bodies. (Edric's appearance in this adaptation is reminescent of a taller-seeming, rather thin-bodied variation on this Navigator puppet from the first television miniseries. His hands are a bit less bat-like and more like a webbed counterpart of his legs, both vaguely frog-like, the overall impression that of a thin and spooky merman living in microgravity.)

Edric's comment on "brother-pilots" was meant to highlight the pseudo-monastic nature of the Guild, as a male counterpart to the other mystic order of the Imperium, the female-dominated Bene Gesserit. (The various costumes of the Guild representatives have often been likened to a blend of monks and medieval patrician merchants, with a few playful anachronisms here and there, such as some Guildsmen wearing 1960s/1970s style colour-tinted sunglasses.)

The scenes of the stoneburner attack on Arrakeen, which leads to the blinding of Paul Atreides and many unfortunate locals, were achieved with a few simpler opticals, camera filters and freeze frames.

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DETI DUNY ("Children of Dune")

Directed by: Martin Hollý Jr.
Produced by: Slovenská filmová tvorba Bratislava (Czechoslovakia), Taurus Film, Omnia Film (Federal Republic of Germany)
Country of origin: Slovakia (partly co-produced with production companies from the Federal Republic of Germany)
Based on the novel by: Frank Herbert
Pre-production phase: 1989
Filming: September May 1989 - February 1990
Post-production: April 1990 - September 1990
Released: 14 October 1990

Cast:
Martin Hrebeň as Leto II Atreides
Monika Haasová as Ghanima Atreides
Natália Hasprová as Alia Atreides
Jana Nagyová as princess Irulan Corrino
Milan Kňažko as Duncan Idaho (ghola)
Marián Geišberg as Stilgar
Branislav Mišík as Farad'n Corrino
Anna Javorková as princess Wensicia Corrino
Bronislav Križan as bashar Tyekanik
Vladimír Hajdu as The Preacher / Paul Atreides
Soňa Valentová as lady Jessica Atreides
Jozef Kroner as Gurney Halleck
Zuzana Kapráliková as Sabiha
Petra Vančíková as Chani Kynes (vision cameo)
Kamila Magálová as Harah (cameo)
Vladimír Müller as baron Vladimir Harkonnen (vision cameos)
and Peter Rúfus as filmbook records voiceover and closing voiceover

Filming locations:
- Koliba Film Studios (most of the interiors, including in sietches, Arrakeen and various palaces)
- Šranecké piesky in Záhorie (near Lakšárska Nová Ves, various Arrakis exteriors)
- several Slovak quarries (Dargov, Brekov and Nižný Hrabovec, rocky Arrakis exteriors)
- Súľovské skaly, Veľký Rozsutec, Bukovské vrchy, Tatra mountain lakes (exterior footage representing Caladan)
- arboretum in Mlyňany, arboretum in Borová Hora (grounds of Castle Caladan)
- Orava Castle (some interiors of Castle Caladan)
- Košice Botanical Gardens (interior scenes of the Arrakeen Palace greenhouse)
- Wadi Rum desert in Jordan (Arrakis exterior shots, main desert filming locations)
- deserts in Uzbekistan (Arrakis exterior shots, main desert filming locations)

Directors of photography: Stanislav Szomolányi and Jozef Šimončič
Music: Svetozár Stračina (orchestral themes), Marián Varga and Collegium Musicum (electronic ambients and electric guitar ambients)
Set design: Viliam Ján Gruska

Special effects and production design:
Once again, most of the effects were passed down from the previous two films. Compared to the previous two films, there was generally much less new ground to cover. Most of the more notable new effects focused on ageing up the actors visually by a few more years, particularly in the case of Hajdu as Paul, now living as a mysterious hermit known as The Preacher, Nagyová's Princess Irulan, Hasprová's Alia Atreides, or Kňažko's Duncan Idaho. Some slight ageing make-up was also added to Geišberg's Stilgar or to Valentová's lady Jessica. Since irulan was portrayed as older by almost twenty years compared to the first novel, her scheming sister Wensicia was cast with the several years older actress Javorková. This created the impression Wensicia is the younger sister of the two, but both are visually close in terms of rough age, with Irulan being the older sibling, by a few years.

A special prosthetic suit was developed for Leto II, meant to represent the biological suit he creates for himself after grafting sandtrout to his body, then travels to Arrakeen to confront Alia, her court, the Qizarate and the rest of the Atreides family. Martin Hrebeň was rather uncomfortable wearing the prosthetic suit, but soldiered on, as it was thankfully only needed for a relatively small amount of scenes.

One of the tricker things in the third installment was the portrayal of the laza tigers. Ultimately, a solution was found in renting out two tamed Bengal tigers, sedating them, then dressing them in a clothing-like prosthetic for the front half and spine area of their bodies. Once the tigers woke, the crew and the tigers' experienced owner hurried up to film the various shots they would need of the beasts attacking. Once the filming was fully completed (it only took a day), the tigers were sedated once more and the prosthetic was removed. Then they were taken back home. However, the work was not done there. A convincing puppet-prosthetic tiger head was constructed, as well as two convincing tiger paws. These were controlled by a somewhat more sophisticated version of the mechanism used for the single prop-hand of the Navigator in the first film, or the mechanisms used for Navigator Edric's puppet in the second installment. The laza tiger head puppet and puppet-paws only appear in the scenes when Leto and Ghanima are hiding in the desert cave they managed to squeeze into, to evade the two big felines. All in all, aside from one carefully prepared forced perspective shot, Martin Hrebeň and Monika Haasová never shared the same shot or filming location with the two tame tigers in mock-up prosthetics.

After the premiere of the third film, due to a fair bit of public interest, a travelling exhibition was created of the various props, costumes, models and miniatures, prosthetics and makeup effects, that gradually toured Czechoslovakia for over a year. It even included some television screens that showed select behind the scenes footage, on a loop, such as the preparation of optical effects, miniature effects and the blending of various techniques via clever cutting.

A short documentary was made about the travelling exhibition, and is nowadays included alongside other behind the scenes documentaries and bonus materials on the DVD and Bluray releases of the film trilogy.

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In the thirty years since the completion of the Dune film trilogy, the little-trodden genre of Slovak science fiction cinema hasn't really seen another production of its size, scope and ambition. After completing the film trilogy, director Martin Hollý felt that any attempts to create a live-action adapdation of God Emperor of Dune would be simply too demanding, especially with all the effects necessary to portray Leto II in his mutated, sandworm-like form, and the story of the novel being heavily philosophical. As if to underline this, the epilogue of the third film featured a condensed montage that showed the events in the future of the Dune universe, during the course of about 5000 years in the future. (For a bit of an idea of how it was presented, imagine the montage from the final minutes of Royal Space Force: The Wings of Honneamise, depicting the personal history and world history of that film's alternate planet Earth. Just apply it to the Dune universe and its future after Children of Dune.)

This montage ended on an ambiguous note and a final voiceover by Peter Rúfus, declaring that the fate of humanity after the fall of the "god-emperor" Leto II, the subsequent Scattering and eventual return of humans from deep space still leaves humanity at a crossroads. Even millennia after the death of Paul and his relatives... The saga of Dune might have concluded, but the complex story of humanity, their awful failings and great achievements, continues...

Despite the fall of communism, the "winds of change" atmosphere in early 1990s Czechoslovakia, and much talk abroad about the end of the Cold War signifying a nebulous "end of history", Hollý's final installment in the Slovak Dune trilogy seemed to imply that "history never ends, nor do the tribulations and challenges that humanity faces". This was very much in line with the themes of Herbert's source material and their thorough skepticism towards any blind belief in achieving utopias, or attempting to forge better futures via dubious, manipulative or anti-humanitarian means. After the release of the third film, many of the more thoughtful reviewers picked up on this and stressed that Hollý's film was more timely than it seems, as an overly relaxed attitude over the Czechoslovakia's dynamically unfolding future could inadvertently cause a sliding back into autocracy instead of a renewal of democracy. The recurring political and social troubles of the next thirty years proved these warnings right. So much so that during the toughest and darkest days of the 90s, Slovak satirists and film fans mockingly labeled then prime minister Mečiar and his corrupt and authoritarian behaviour as "baron Vladimír, millennia too early". Even more than thirty years later after the completion of the trilogy, many viewers still view the trilogy not only as a classic, but as a thoughtful meditation on the dangers of falling for the lure of "easy solutions", cynical shortcuts and fanatical, totalitarian ideologies.

In the early 1980s, director Hollý and his script writer collaborators took the fictional Litany Against Fear from Dune to heart: "Fear is the mind-killer." Despite the complex and often artistically stifling situation in 1980s Czechoslovakia, they managed to create a well-received adaptation that helped put Slovakia on the science fiction cinema map, and remains an admired example of the genre from just before the end of the Cold War. Though proposals have occassionally resurfaced for at least an animated adaptation of God Emperor of Dune, there are currently no realistic prospects of creating another Slovak-language film adaptation of Frank Herbert's works, whether one from the Dune series or anything other.
 
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