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WI The Sex Pistols don't go on the Bill Grundy show plus Glen Matlock stays in the band.

I recently watched some documentaries on the band and one thing that guitarist Steve Jones said was that it all happened too fast and that if the above mentioned happened, they would've lasted longer. Basically, my idea for the TL would have included Queen's Freddy Mercury not going to his fateful dentist appointment and TTL having a pretty unremarkable interview as the POD, and the Sex Pistols would be able to more slowly (relative to OTL) have more sustainable success. Not sure how to keep Glen in the band though. What do you guys think?
 
WI The Sex Pistols don't go on the Bill Grundy show plus Glen Matlock stays in the band.

I recently watched some documentaries on the band and one thing that guitarist Steve Jones said was that it all happened too fast and that if the above mentioned happened, they would've lasted longer. Basically, my idea for the TL would have included Queen's Freddy Mercury not going to his fateful dentist appointment and TTL having a pretty unremarkable interview as the POD, and the Sex Pistols would be able to more slowly (relative to OTL) have more sustainable success. Not sure how to keep Glen in the band though. What do you guys think?
Not sure that's possible with the Pistols, punk had a very narrow window anyway and it seems the manager deliberately set out to cause tension that saw Matlock walk. Once he's gone you get Sid Vicious and that was always going to end in disaster.
 
Not sure that's possible with the Pistols, punk had a very narrow window anyway and it seems the manager deliberately set out to cause tension that saw Matlock walk. Once he's gone you get Sid Vicious and that was always going to end in disaster.
IMO, one of the reasons that the manager drove the wedge between the band members was to exert control as they were front page news at the moment. I was considering the limited lifespan of punk but i think one of the reasons for its demise in '78 was the death of the Sex Pistols. So, theoretically if you could extend the lifespan of the band you could widen punks window. IDK though just some thoughts.
 
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Rolling Stones? Gerry and the Pacemakers? The Searchers?
Possibly the Who, (although they're a little to late). Given how many bands started around that time (many of which were going even before the Beatles) something was going to break out sooner or later at about that time. The simple pressure of too many Elvis clones meant evolution had to occur to keep people listening and evolve rock did as it has in the sixty years since.
 
Mr_ Bondoc and Awesome Sauce
presents
LINK: https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/f-the-stutz-bearcat-an-alternate-tl-of-film.482246/post-20102860
hays_code_notice.jpg


The Hays Code was a set of rules that enforced censorship on the American cinema in response to the increase of public complaints about the lewd content of movies and the scandalous behavior of Hollywood movie stars. The increasingly liberal content of Hollywood films, and the scandals surrounding famous movie stars, led to a media frenzy. The public outcry was so great that the federal government were seriously considering the establishment of a national censorship board. To prevent this happening Hollywood moguls and the movie studios decided to voluntarily censor films themselves.

A list of production directives were established by a Hollywood board led by Will Hays, a former US Postmaster General, and the President of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA). In 1930 Will Hays produced a list of rules and guidelines called "The Don'ts and Be Carefuls" which the Hays Code was based on. Its official name was the Code to Govern the Making of Talking, Synchronized and Silent Motion Pictures. The Hays Code was set aside in 1965 when the MPPDA adopted the age-based rating system that is in force today.

First published in March 1930, the Motion Picture Production Code (popularly known as the Hays Code after its creator Will H.Hays) was the first attempt at introducing film censorship in the US through laying down a series of guidelines to film producers.

The Code was founded according to the concept: "if motion pictures present stories that will affect lives for the better, they can become the most powerful force for the improvement of mankind" - the clear implication being that films were signally failing to achieve these lofty aims.

The Code was based on three general principles:

- No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.
- Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.
- Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.

These were developed in a series of rules grouped under the self-explanatory headings Crimes Against The Law, Sex, Vulgarity, Obscenity, Profanity, Costume, Dances (i.e. suggestive movements), Religion, Locations (i.e. the bedroom), National Feelings, Titles and "Repellent Subjects" (extremely graphic violence).

See: https://www.ranker.com/list/weird-hays-code-rules/rebecca-shortall

So what if those rules and regulations had never been created for Hollywood???
 
Mr_ Bondoc and Awesome Sauce
presents
LINK: https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/f-the-stutz-bearcat-an-alternate-tl-of-film.482246/post-20102860
View attachment 518235

The Hays Code was a set of rules that enforced censorship on the American cinema in response to the increase of public complaints about the lewd content of movies and the scandalous behavior of Hollywood movie stars. The increasingly liberal content of Hollywood films, and the scandals surrounding famous movie stars, led to a media frenzy. The public outcry was so great that the federal government were seriously considering the establishment of a national censorship board. To prevent this happening Hollywood moguls and the movie studios decided to voluntarily censor films themselves.

A list of production directives were established by a Hollywood board led by Will Hays, a former US Postmaster General, and the President of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA). In 1930 Will Hays produced a list of rules and guidelines called "The Don'ts and Be Carefuls" which the Hays Code was based on. Its official name was the Code to Govern the Making of Talking, Synchronized and Silent Motion Pictures. The Hays Code was set aside in 1965 when the MPPDA adopted the age-based rating system that is in force today.

First published in March 1930, the Motion Picture Production Code (popularly known as the Hays Code after its creator Will H.Hays) was the first attempt at introducing film censorship in the US through laying down a series of guidelines to film producers.

The Code was founded according to the concept: "if motion pictures present stories that will affect lives for the better, they can become the most powerful force for the improvement of mankind" - the clear implication being that films were signally failing to achieve these lofty aims.

The Code was based on three general principles:

- No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.
- Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.
- Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.

These were developed in a series of rules grouped under the self-explanatory headings Crimes Against The Law, Sex, Vulgarity, Obscenity, Profanity, Costume, Dances (i.e. suggestive movements), Religion, Locations (i.e. the bedroom), National Feelings, Titles and "Repellent Subjects" (extremely graphic violence).

See: https://www.ranker.com/list/weird-hays-code-rules/rebecca-shortall

So what if those rules and regulations had never been created for Hollywood???
You'd need to avoid the 1915 supreme court ruling for that, once that happened the writing was on the wall the second Hollywood started trying to really push the boundrys on anything. That it was gangster violence that finally saw the code enforced (among other things) was little but an accident of timing.
 
For one thing, I think the Looney Tunes cartoons would have more violence, toilet humor, profanity, and sexual innuendo, since they were never intended for children.

Probably something like the Private Snafu shorts.
 
Mr_ Bondoc and Awesome Sauce
presents
LINK: https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/f-the-stutz-bearcat-an-alternate-tl-of-film.482246/post-20102860
View attachment 518235

The Hays Code was a set of rules that enforced censorship on the American cinema in response to the increase of public complaints about the lewd content of movies and the scandalous behavior of Hollywood movie stars. The increasingly liberal content of Hollywood films, and the scandals surrounding famous movie stars, led to a media frenzy. The public outcry was so great that the federal government were seriously considering the establishment of a national censorship board. To prevent this happening Hollywood moguls and the movie studios decided to voluntarily censor films themselves.

A list of production directives were established by a Hollywood board led by Will Hays, a former US Postmaster General, and the President of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA). In 1930 Will Hays produced a list of rules and guidelines called "The Don'ts and Be Carefuls" which the Hays Code was based on. Its official name was the Code to Govern the Making of Talking, Synchronized and Silent Motion Pictures. The Hays Code was set aside in 1965 when the MPPDA adopted the age-based rating system that is in force today.

First published in March 1930, the Motion Picture Production Code (popularly known as the Hays Code after its creator Will H.Hays) was the first attempt at introducing film censorship in the US through laying down a series of guidelines to film producers.

The Code was founded according to the concept: "if motion pictures present stories that will affect lives for the better, they can become the most powerful force for the improvement of mankind" - the clear implication being that films were signally failing to achieve these lofty aims.

The Code was based on three general principles:

- No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.
- Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.
- Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.

These were developed in a series of rules grouped under the self-explanatory headings Crimes Against The Law, Sex, Vulgarity, Obscenity, Profanity, Costume, Dances (i.e. suggestive movements), Religion, Locations (i.e. the bedroom), National Feelings, Titles and "Repellent Subjects" (extremely graphic violence).

See: https://www.ranker.com/list/weird-hays-code-rules/rebecca-shortall

So what if those rules and regulations had never been created for Hollywood???
Really looking forward to reading this. Always wanted to see a world where Howard Hawks got to keep churning out films like Scarface. May I suggest you include Samuel Fuller ITTL as his career in the 40's and 50's would be extremely poignant. As he was breaking a lot of those rules IOTL on his own. He is probably my favorite underrated director ever. Cannot express how much people need to watch his films. Again I am really looking forward to reading this and I thoroughly enjoy this concept. If you're open to any other collaboration please let me know.
 
Mr_ Bondoc and Awesome Sauce
presents
LINK: https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/f-the-stutz-bearcat-an-alternate-tl-of-film.482246/post-20102860
View attachment 518235

The Hays Code was a set of rules that enforced censorship on the American cinema in response to the increase of public complaints about the lewd content of movies and the scandalous behavior of Hollywood movie stars. The increasingly liberal content of Hollywood films, and the scandals surrounding famous movie stars, led to a media frenzy. The public outcry was so great that the federal government were seriously considering the establishment of a national censorship board. To prevent this happening Hollywood moguls and the movie studios decided to voluntarily censor films themselves.

A list of production directives were established by a Hollywood board led by Will Hays, a former US Postmaster General, and the President of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA). In 1930 Will Hays produced a list of rules and guidelines called "The Don'ts and Be Carefuls" which the Hays Code was based on. Its official name was the Code to Govern the Making of Talking, Synchronized and Silent Motion Pictures. The Hays Code was set aside in 1965 when the MPPDA adopted the age-based rating system that is in force today.

First published in March 1930, the Motion Picture Production Code (popularly known as the Hays Code after its creator Will H.Hays) was the first attempt at introducing film censorship in the US through laying down a series of guidelines to film producers.

The Code was founded according to the concept: "if motion pictures present stories that will affect lives for the better, they can become the most powerful force for the improvement of mankind" - the clear implication being that films were signally failing to achieve these lofty aims.

The Code was based on three general principles:

- No picture shall be produced that will lower the moral standards of those who see it. Hence the sympathy of the audience should never be thrown to the side of crime, wrongdoing, evil or sin.
- Correct standards of life, subject only to the requirements of drama and entertainment, shall be presented.
- Law, natural or human, shall not be ridiculed, nor shall sympathy be created for its violation.

These were developed in a series of rules grouped under the self-explanatory headings Crimes Against The Law, Sex, Vulgarity, Obscenity, Profanity, Costume, Dances (i.e. suggestive movements), Religion, Locations (i.e. the bedroom), National Feelings, Titles and "Repellent Subjects" (extremely graphic violence).

See: https://www.ranker.com/list/weird-hays-code-rules/rebecca-shortall

So what if those rules and regulations had never been created for Hollywood???
And this is a collaborative TL, so you can share and review your ideas on the thread as always!
 
Doctor Who ...



THE FIRST DOCTOR (Wanda Ventham) starred from 1963 to 1964. Initially presented as a mysterious traveller from the future - the role was written for a man, but producers felt they could perhaps bank on a similar popularity as Cathy Gale had in The Avengers the previous year.



THE SECOND DOCTOR (John Laurie) starred from 1965 to 1968 and was a marked contrast to his predecessor - in age, gender, accent and demeanour of character. This Doctor was a cantankerous, often grumpy and mercurial Scotsman - and behind the scenes, the transition from Ventham to Laurie saw a one year hiatus after Laurie's first season, to retool the show away from largely historical to a more science fiction adventure show.



THE THIRD DOCTOR (Frazer Hines) starred from 1969 to 1972, with his first run of stories running across the 69/70 Festive Period before returning to the normal schedule for his final two seasons. Causing the delay in his first run, was the fact that the new youthful Doctor was featured in Dr Who: The Movie which saw him team up with both Ventham and Laurie against their fiendish (and new) nemesis, the rakish Corsair (Peter Wyngarde) who would become a recurring foe for the Third Doctor.



THE FOURTH DOCTOR (Michael Billington) starred from 1973 to 1976 - his first year was used to mark the run up to the Tenth Anniversary of the show and saw a series of special episodes (each episode saw a return of either a former Doctor of fan favourite villain), with his regular seasons starting in 1974. After two younger actors in the role, producers decided that 1977 would bring a change ...



THE FIFTH DOCTOR (Frankie Howerd) starred for only a single season in 1977 which, unfortunately, ended with the show being placed on hiatus for sixteen years (with the exception of a single American funded movie in 1985 in which Howerd passed the torch to the Sixth Doctor). Howerd was notably allowed to use his native Yorkshire accent in the role with him quipping to companion, Mary, that all planets had a North ...
 
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So, I had an idea for a new variation of my Alternate History of Animated Films project.

Here, the point of divergence isn't 1940, but 1950. Like IOTL, the early Disney and Fleischer films flopped during the war, and other studios cancelled plans for animated films. Then, after the success of Cinderella in 1950, this inspires other studios to try again at features.

I'm thinking Warner Brothers could release an animated film in 1952, since they were Disney's biggest competitors at the time. After that, they could release a new feature every couple years, before stopping in the sixties after the main WB animation studio is shut down in 1964.

The question is, what kind of films would WB do? Would they make originals with new characters like Disney and Fleischer did? (By original, I mean not featuring pre-existing WB characters; they would almost certainly be adaptations of older material.) Or would their films feature the big Looney Tunes stars like Bugs and Daffy?

I'm imagining comedic adventures in the vein of Bing Crosby and Bob Hope's "Road To..." films, which each film involving Bugs and Daffy forgetting to take the left turn at Albuquerque and ending up in a new place. Like, imagine feature length versions of shorts like "Bully For Bugs", "Ali Baba Bunny", or "The Abominable Snow-Rabbit".
 
Here, the point of divergence isn't 1940, but 1950. Like IOTL, the early Disney and Fleischer films flopped during the war, and other studios cancelled plans for animated films. Then, after the success of Cinderella in 1950, this inspires other studios to try again at features.
Would Fleischer still do DC adaptations ITTL?
 
Would Fleischer still do DC adaptations ITTL?
Presumably as it says the flops still occured and (sadly) the original Superman shorts failed to make vast ammounts of money. They were expensive to begin with, then the war came along and the second batch were made cheaper by someone else (and became war propoganda rather than proto DCAU, also some very nasty racism in places).
 
While we're on this topic, do you think if WB did an animated feature during the fifties, would it utilize the same comedic formula of their shorts, or would it try to copy what Disney was doing at the time?
 
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