Pop Culture Timelines Go-To Thread

That and it was trying to be portable while running off carts that had never been designed to be used anywhere but with a mains socket. By modern standards the Mega Drive was a huge power hog and naturally that problem ported over to the portable system and ensured that the problem with the Game Gear's battery life was even worse on its nominal successor.
Excatly,at least PSP battery was rechargable and good enough to play games and watch a movie, so if anything Sega either just make an offbrand GBA or doesn't bother
 
Question - does anyone know anything about the recording industry in France? I heard that there are no record companies there in the traditional sense. Is this true and what does it mean?
 
Excatly,at least PSP battery was rechargable and good enough to play games and watch a movie, so if anything Sega either just make an offbrand GBA or doesn't bother
True and the major issue remains that you can't get much above a portable NES with the tech available in the mid 90's and actually have it last more than five minutes. Its only around 2004 (largely due to the rise of the mobile phone) that battery life gets good enough to do that, until then Nomad or any theoretical 32 bit system is either DOA or has to make compromises (such as leaving off the screen light in the GBA mk1).
 
True and the major issue remains that you can't get much above a portable NES with the tech available in the mid 90's and actually have it last more than five minutes. Its only around 2004 (largely due to the rise of the mobile phone) that battery life gets good enough to do that, until then Nomad or any theoretical 32 bit system is either DOA or has to make compromises (such as leaving off the screen light in the GBA mk1).
I means late(97) as Nintendo did have a GBA equivalent ready but Pokemon success delay it,so the tech is there,but the know how is something Sega lacked
 
I means late(97) as Nintendo did have a GBA equivalent ready but Pokemon success delay it,so the tech is there,but the know how is something Sega lacked
Nintendo wasn't trying to cram the guts of a home console into a six inch box though. Making it work portable requires different designs and overall thinking than a home console. That's something Nintendo (and later Sony) understood. Sega didn't and essentially tried to box up a full size Master system and then a Mega drive on tech that couldn't quite work with what existed at the time. Hence how big the Gear (and the Lynx) were and as noted the terrible battery life.

Of course the irony is that these days you can buy a portable Mega drive with dozens of games built in. They just didn't wait long enough to make it work at the time.
 
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Nintendo wasn't trying to cram the guts of a home console into a six inch box though. Making it work portable requires different designs and overall thinking than a home console. That's something Nintendo (and later Sony) understood. Sega didn't and essentially tried to box up furry a Master system and then a Mega drive on tech that couldn't quite work with what existed at the time. Hence how big the Gear (and the Lynx) were and as noted the terrible battery life.

Of course the irony is that these days you can buy a portable Mega drive with dozens of games built in. They just didn't wait long enough to make it work at the time.
Yeah and I think was mostly to recycle the innards of both home consoles that anything else, and as I mentioned PSP was his own thing but the value worth it
 
Yeah and I think was mostly to recycle the innards of both home consoles that anything else, and as I mentioned PSP was his own thing but the value worth it
Yeah only issue with the psp was the lack of a second stick otherwise a decent bit of kit that simply came to late to deal with the DS and the explosion of smartphone gaming.
 
Yeah only issue with the psp was the lack of a second stick otherwise a decent bit of kit that simply came to late to deal with the DS and the explosion of smartphone gaming.
DS and PSP launched at the same time and PSP sold fucking 80M, the one fumble the ball was Sony
 
DS and PSP launched at the same time and PSP sold fucking 80M, the one fumble the ball was Sony
True but it vanished into "also run" very quickly and I think the decision to release the majority of the big games onto the PS2 as well saw it fade out all to fast. The VITA on the other hand was a huge mistake.
 

Aquagate - The Death of Williams Street, or, “What If The Boston Bomb Scare Affected Adult Swim More Directly?”​


January 31, 2007. A day that would live in infamy.

Lite Brites are hung up in major cities to promote Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters. Boston confused these Lite Brites for bombs. Half the city was shut down. Peter Berdovsky and Sean Stevens, the guys behind the stunt, were arrested. Cartoon Network had to pay $2 million to the city, and Jim Samples resigned as CN’s president. Stuart Snyder took his position, plunging CN into its dark age, an age filled with reality television.

In our timeline, Adult Swim themselves- technically a separate network from Cartoon Network by this time, a la Nick at Nite, and the ones who ACTUALLY broadcast the show based on the movie whose promotional campaign caused all this- got out unscathed. Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford kept their spots in charge of Williams Street. Aqua Teen Hunger Force continued its original run for seven more seasons. Adult Swim would continue as is and then expand, eventually seeing more hours than CN themselves. Even the original incarnation of Toonami, under Williams Street’s supervision and the infamous TOM 4 era, took over a year to die.

This is not our timeline.

Complete transcript of a phone call between Mike Lazzo and Michael Ouweleen, May 3, 2007

LAZZO
“Hey, Mike. What’s up?”

OUWELEEN
“Boss says everyone needs to clear the building and get out within two weeks. You’re all fired.”

LAZZO
“W-what? Why-”

OUWELEEN
“Don’t play dumb. You know exactly why.”

In this timeline, Stuart Snyder goes right to the source of the bomb scare. Effective immediately, Williams Street is closed down, their shows are cancelled across the board, and almost everyone is let go, including Lazzo and Crofford. I say almost, because Michael Ouweleen, after agreeing to publicly condemn Lazzo and Crofford and play by Snyder’s rules, was made vice president of CN. He would oversee the last few months of Adult Swim and Toonami, as well as their eventual replacements, and be an executive producer on Out of Jimmy’s Head after having previously done the same for its pilot film Re-Animated.

Toonami’s shutdown message

Toonami came to a close on September 15, 2007, the day after CN’s infamous “Fall” rebrand. What managed to last for a year and a half IOTL instead lasts only six months. The next night, September 16 and into the morning of the 17th, Adult Swim made its final broadcast. The bumps for that night were “themed” around the five stages of grief, a perfect fit for the loss of a beloved block.

10 PM: Stage One. Denial. Despite previous recent bumps stating otherwise, and the ominous countdown in the corner, Adult Swim denies that anything is wrong and that it was all just a misunderstanding, and they’re not REALLY going to shut down… right?

11 PM: Stage Two. Anger. The bumps devolve into no-punctuation all-caps screaming on a red BG, with ear-piercing static in place of music. They denounce Cartoon Network, Stuart Snyder, Berdovsky and Steven, the city of Boston, Boston police, police in general, the Aqua Teens, the Mooninites, “Michael” (who could be interpreted as either Mike Lazzo or Michael Ouweleen), and even the viewers themselves, all while spewing obscenities at a rate that would be funny if this all wasn’t so terrifying. Most humorously, the logo at both the end of the bumps and as a screen bug is also changed, resulting in the network being rebranded as [FUCK YOU] for two hours.

1 AM: Stage 3. Bargaining. The background is black once more, the all-caps is now all-lowercase, the BGM is now frantic Morse code, and the logo now ominously reading [help us]. The subject matter of the bumps turns to the network trying its best to survive, offering to cancel Aqua Teen and never air it again, or either dump all of its live action content or switch exclusively to live action content, and even turning to the viewers for help, telling them to avenge their death- all of which peppered with apologies.

3 AM: Stage 4. Depression. The bumps are now silent, and consist of the network in a spiral of depression and self-blame, stating phrases like “what’s the point” and “we brought it on ourselves” and “adult swim was a mistake”. The logo also becomes [fuck us], a tragic counterpoint to [FUCK YOU] from earlier.

5 AM: Stage 5. Acceptance. Adult Swim’s final hour sees things return to normal- the punctuation, the proper casing, the music, and the [adult swim] logo. It is a bittersweet return to form, and the bumps themselves become surprisingly wholesome and heartfelt, acknowledging their imminent demise with a “whatever will be will be” attitude- don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened. Of course, ever waggish, they also take potshots at Snyder for shutting them down and the city of Boston for overreacting so bad in the first place, before going “c’est la vie”. Also of note was a “special thanks” bump listing every creator and producer involved with Adult Swim.

The final thing that aired on Adult Swim was a brief return to the original “pool” bumpers, provided by Primal Screen.

LIFEGUARD (V.O.)
“Everyone out of the pool, Adult Swim is now closed.”

Unlike the regular pool bumpers, this final bumper includes characters from various Adult Swim shows leaving the pool alongside the senior citizens. And Ouwleen gets in one last potshot at Aqua Teen, the show that caused this debacle:

FRYLOCK
“Well, it’s as they say. All good things come to an end.”

SHAKE
“What the hell does that have to do with us?”

The final shot is of an empty pool, with the Adult Swim logo overlaid on top of the footage. The last words over this footage?

LIFEGUARD (V.O.)
“Alright everyone, good night. Goodbye. That means you, too.”

Cartoon Network then proceeded to start its day as normal, and continued to run until 11 PM, when viewers were introduced to Adult Swim’s replacement- Cartoon Network After Dark.

The concept of an adult programming slot on Cartoon Network was far too popular to just remove, especially with Futurama and Family Guy still bringing in the ratings. As such, Cartoon Network After Dark was quite similar to Adult Swim. It continued to run in its old timeslots (save the 10 PM hour on Sundays) and aired much of the same programming. It even continued to be considered its own network despite carrying the Cartoon Network name, much like Nick at Nite with Nickelodeon. However, there were several key differences between Adult Swim and Cartoon Network After Dark.

The first and most obvious would be the branding. CNAD’s branding was a mixture between the main CN’s current “Fall” branding in terms of aesthetics and the “City” branding in terms of concept, with characters roaming the streets at night, going to bars and strip clubs, and generally causing trouble. The logo was also not derived from the 2004 Cartoon Network logo being used at the time, but the original 1992 logo that was still being used in secondary purposes, with “After Dark” underneath it in neon tubing. A shortened “CNAD” version was used as a screen bug.

The second was the near-complete lack of Williams Street content. In addition to being completely shut down, Williams Street had its shows virtually purged from the airwaves, with three exceptions. One was Robot Chicken, a coproduction with Sony that moved over to Sony full time following the shutdown. The second was The Big O, an anime that Adult Swim only produced the second season of, and was otherwise licensed by Bandai. The third, and the most notorious, was Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law. While it had been cancelled before the shutdown due to production problems, it remained on the air at the behest of its creator… Michael Ouweleen. Mike Lazzo later bitterly called it “his reward for stabbing us in the back”.

As a result, Cartoon Network After Dark had to rely primarily on third-party series. This included quasi-originals Home Movies, The Boondocks, and the aforementioned Robot Chicken, as well as reruns of Futurama (until the contract ran out at the end of 2007), Family Guy, American Dad, Mission Hill, The Oblongs, and Baby Blues. Oh, and pretty much all of their anime. The only first-party original that survived was The Venture Bros., which was not a Williams Street production. This meant that Team Venture naturally became the face of Cartoon Network After Dark, by process of elimination.

The third difference is that, while it was always a subsidiary of Cartoon Network and despite being technically its own channel, CN and CNAS were essentially joined at the hip now. Ouweleen may have been in charge of the block, but Snyder ultimately called the shots. While obviously nothing TV-MA would ever air on daytime CN, shows would be shared and swapped between the day and night brands. TV-PG shows on both sides would be shared, resulting in Naruto becoming a fixture of After Dark, which also began airing films like Batman (1989) and Spider-Man (2002), and Futurama (at this point almost all PG episodes) briefly airing on CN. Gigantor, Voltron, and very late AS pickup Astro Boy moved to CN’s spinoff channel Boomerang, as did reruns of Dragon Ball Z, revitalizing the Boomeraction block. Pee-Wee’s Playhouse moved to daytime Cartoon Network, joining Goosebumps, Out of Jimmy’s Head, and TBS’s rights to Saved by the Bell in Snyder’s crusade to turn CN into a true Nickelodeon competitor, name of the network be damned.

WEEKNIGHT SCHEDULE AT LAUNCH
11 PM/2:30 AM: Futurama
11:30 PM/3 AM: Naruto
12 AM/3:30 AM: Family Guy
12:30 AM/4 AM: The Venture Bros.
1 AM/4:30 AM: Robot Chicken
1:15 AM/4:45 AM: Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law
1:30 AM/5 AM: Inuyasha
2 AM/5:30 AM: Home Movies

Toonami, meanwhile, had its replacement come on the 22nd, a week after its demise, in the form of You Are Here. It was basically Toonami, running in the same Saturday night timeslot, but more corporate-approved.

7 PM: Pokémon
7:30 PM: Code Lyoko
8 PM: Ben 10
8:30 PM: Storm Hawks
9 PM: Teen Titans
9:30 PM: Naruto (x2)
10:30 PM: Bobobo-bo Bo-Bobo

TO BE CONTINUED…?​
 

Aquagate - The Death of Williams Street, or, “What If The Boston Bomb Scare Affected Adult Swim More Directly?”​


January 31, 2007. A day that would live in infamy.

Lite Brites are hung up in major cities to promote Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters. Boston confused these Lite Brites for bombs. Half the city was shut down. Peter Berdovsky and Sean Stevens, the guys behind the stunt, were arrested. Cartoon Network had to pay $2 million to the city, and Jim Samples resigned as CN’s president. Stuart Snyder took his position, plunging CN into its dark age, an age filled with reality television.

In our timeline, Adult Swim themselves- technically a separate network from Cartoon Network by this time, a la Nick at Nite, and the ones who ACTUALLY broadcast the show based on the movie whose promotional campaign caused all this- got out unscathed. Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford kept their spots in charge of Williams Street. Aqua Teen Hunger Force continued its original run for seven more seasons. Adult Swim would continue as is and then expand, eventually seeing more hours than CN themselves. Even the original incarnation of Toonami, under Williams Street’s supervision and the infamous TOM 4 era, took over a year to die.

This is not our timeline.​
Color me interested.
Complete transcript of a phone call between Mike Lazzo and Michael Ouweleen, May 3, 2007

LAZZO
“Hey, Mike. What’s up?”

OUWELEEN
“Boss says everyone needs to clear the building and get out within two weeks. You’re all fired.”

LAZZO
“W-what? Why-”

OUWELEEN
“Don’t play dumb. You know exactly why.”​
Uh oh.
In this timeline, Stuart Snyder goes right to the source of the bomb scare. Effective immediately, Williams Street is closed down, their shows are cancelled across the board, and almost everyone is let go, including Lazzo and Crofford. I say almost, because Michael Ouweleen, after agreeing to publicly condemn Lazzo and Crofford and play by Snyder’s rules, was made vice president of CN. He would oversee the last few months of Adult Swim and Toonami, as well as their eventual replacements, and be an executive producer on Out of Jimmy’s Head after having previously done the same for its pilot film Re-Animated.
So Cartoon Network cancels Toonami and Adult Swim early AND still adds live-action to the channel. I'm starting to miss Williams Street already.
Toonami’s shutdown message

Toonami came to a close on September 15, 2007, the day after CN’s infamous “Fall” rebrand. What managed to last for a year and a half IOTL instead lasts only six months. The next night, September 16 and into the morning of the 17th, Adult Swim made its final broadcast. The bumps for that night were “themed” around the five stages of grief, a perfect fit for the loss of a beloved block.​
This makes me wonder who the "Fall" term is really meant for: The Autumn season of CN, or the demise of their night owl viewership.
10 PM: Stage One. Denial. Despite previous recent bumps stating otherwise, and the ominous countdown in the corner, Adult Swim denies that anything is wrong and that it was all just a misunderstanding, and they’re not REALLY going to shut down… right?

11 PM: Stage Two. Anger. The bumps devolve into no-punctuation all-caps screaming on a red BG, with ear-piercing static in place of music. They denounce Cartoon Network, Stuart Snyder, Berdovsky and Steven, the city of Boston, Boston police, police in general, the Aqua Teens, the Mooninites, “Michael” (who could be interpreted as either Mike Lazzo or Michael Ouweleen), and even the viewers themselves, all while spewing obscenities at a rate that would be funny if this all wasn’t so terrifying. Most humorously, the logo at both the end of the bumps and as a screen bug is also changed, resulting in the network being rebranded as [FUCK YOU] for two hours.

1 AM: Stage 3. Bargaining. The background is black once more, the all-caps is now all-lowercase, the BGM is now frantic Morse code, and the logo now ominously reading [help us]. The subject matter of the bumps turns to the network trying its best to survive, offering to cancel Aqua Teen and never air it again, or either dump all of its live action content or switch exclusively to live action content, and even turning to the viewers for help, telling them to avenge their death- all of which peppered with apologies.

3 AM: Stage 4. Depression. The bumps are now silent, and consist of the network in a spiral of depression and self-blame, stating phrases like “what’s the point” and “we brought it on ourselves” and “adult swim was a mistake”. The logo also becomes [fuck us], a tragic counterpoint to [FUCK YOU] from earlier.

5 AM: Stage 5. Acceptance. Adult Swim’s final hour sees things return to normal- the punctuation, the proper casing, the music, and the [adult swim] logo. It is a bittersweet return to form, and the bumps themselves become surprisingly wholesome and heartfelt, acknowledging their imminent demise with a “whatever will be will be” attitude- don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened. Of course, ever waggish, they also take potshots at Snyder for shutting them down and the city of Boston for overreacting so bad in the first place, before going “c’est la vie”. Also of note was a “special thanks” bump listing every creator and producer involved with Adult Swim.​
Worst section? Anger. Best section? Acceptance. Such is life.
The final thing that aired on Adult Swim was a brief return to the original “pool” bumpers, provided by Primal Screen.

LIFEGUARD (V.O.)
“Everyone out of the pool, Adult Swim is now closed.”

Unlike the regular pool bumpers, this final bumper includes characters from various Adult Swim shows leaving the pool alongside the senior citizens. And Ouwleen gets in one last potshot at Aqua Teen, the show that caused this debacle:

FRYLOCK
“Well, it’s as they say. All good things come to an end.”

SHAKE
“What the hell does that have to do with us?”

The final shot is of an empty pool, with the Adult Swim logo overlaid on top of the footage. The last words over this footage?

LIFEGUARD (V.O.)
“Alright everyone, good night. Goodbye. That means you, too.”​
At least Primal Screen did the honors of sending this block off to pasture.
Cartoon Network then proceeded to start its day as normal, and continued to run until 11 PM, when viewers were introduced to Adult Swim’s replacement- Cartoon Network After Dark.

The concept of an adult programming slot on Cartoon Network was far too popular to just remove, especially with Futurama and Family Guy still bringing in the ratings. As such, Cartoon Network After Dark was quite similar to Adult Swim. It continued to run in its old timeslots (save the 10 PM hour on Sundays) and aired much of the same programming. It even continued to be considered its own network despite carrying the Cartoon Network name, much like Nick at Nite with Nickelodeon. However, there were several key differences between Adult Swim and Cartoon Network After Dark.​
I have a feeling a good chunk of these differences would be met with disdain on the Internet.
The first and most obvious would be the branding. CNAD’s branding was a mixture between the main CN’s current “Fall” branding in terms of aesthetics and the “City” branding in terms of concept, with characters roaming the streets at night, going to bars and strip clubs, and generally causing trouble. The logo was also not derived from the 2004 Cartoon Network logo being used at the time, but the original 1992 logo that was still being used in secondary purposes, with “After Dark” underneath it in neon tubing. A shortened “CNAD” version was used as a screen bug.​
Okay, this is something I can actually get to like about the replacement.
The second was the near-complete lack of Williams Street content. In addition to being completely shut down, Williams Street had its shows virtually purged from the airwaves, with three exceptions. One was Robot Chicken, a coproduction with Sony that moved over to Sony full time following the shutdown. The second was The Big O, an anime that Adult Swim only produced the second season of, and was otherwise licensed by Bandai. The third, and the most notorious, was Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law. While it had been cancelled before the shutdown due to production problems, it remained on the air at the behest of its creator… Michael Ouweleen. Mike Lazzo later bitterly called it “his reward for stabbing us in the back”.​
Robot Chicken and The Big O, I can understand sticking around. Plus, with the former becoming a Sony product, I have a feeling we might see The Critic or Dilbert on CNAD.

However, despite Harvey Birdman revolving around classic Hanna-Barbera characters, even more than its predecessor Space Ghost Coast to Coast, I find myself on Mike Lazzo's camp when it comes to seeing this particular series stick around.
As a result, Cartoon Network After Dark had to rely primarily on third-party series. This included quasi-originals Home Movies, The Boondocks, and the aforementioned Robot Chicken, as well as reruns of Futurama (until the contract ran out at the end of 2007), Family Guy, American Dad, Mission Hill, The Oblongs, and Baby Blues. Oh, and pretty much all of their anime. The only first-party original that survived was The Venture Bros., which was not a Williams Street production. This meant that Team Venture naturally became the face of Cartoon Network After Dark, by process of elimination.​
I mean, it helps that Team Venture is a parody of Jonny Quest, and seeing The Venture Bros. with some form of Cartoon Network branding on it likely means the actual Jonny Quest has less of a chance at a straight-forward revival.
The third difference is that, while it was always a subsidiary of Cartoon Network and despite being technically its own channel, CN and CNAS were essentially joined at the hip now. Ouweleen may have been in charge of the block, but Snyder ultimately called the shots. While obviously nothing TV-MA would ever air on daytime CN, shows would be shared and swapped between the day and night brands. TV-PG shows on both sides would be shared, resulting in Naruto becoming a fixture of After Dark, which also began airing films like Batman (1989) and Spider-Man (2002), and Futurama (at this point almost all PG episodes) briefly airing on CN.​
At least no one's complaining about more adults watching than kids, with the two blocks joined at the hip. Plus, Naruto and the live-action movies do fit the late-night block. Futurama on CN is an interesting choice, on the other hand.
Gigantor, Voltron, and very late AS pickup Astro Boy moved to CN’s spinoff channel Boomerang, as did reruns of Dragon Ball Z, revitalizing the Boomeraction block. Pee-Wee’s Playhouse moved to daytime Cartoon Network, joining Goosebumps, Out of Jimmy’s Head, and TBS’s rights to Saved by the Bell in Snyder’s crusade to turn CN into a true Nickelodeon competitor, name of the network be damned.​
At least Boomerang was able to reap some benefits of the exhaust, and I hope Boomeraction starts airing on weekdays to compensate for this.

But the extra helpings of live-action? To play devil's advocate, Pee-Wee's Playhouse is cartoonish enough to fit right into the network, and Saved by the Bell did air among cartoons like The Smurfs, Yo Yogi!, and Captain N. But this just gives more reason to keep CN Real around for more than a few months, and I'd hate to see the online discourse that results from that.
WEEKNIGHT SCHEDULE AT LAUNCH
11 PM/2:30 AM: Futurama
11:30 PM/3 AM: Naruto
12 AM/3:30 AM: Family Guy
12:30 AM/4 AM: The Venture Bros.
1 AM/4:30 AM: Robot Chicken
1:15 AM/4:45 AM: Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law
1:30 AM/5 AM: Inuyasha
2 AM/5:30 AM: Home Movies​
Well, at least Inuyasha was able to survive. That's good for something, at least.
Toonami, meanwhile, had its replacement come on the 22nd, a week after its demise, in the form of You Are Here. It was basically Toonami, running in the same Saturday night timeslot, but more corporate-approved.

7 PM: Pokémon
7:30 PM: Code Lyoko
8 PM: Ben 10
8:30 PM: Storm Hawks
9 PM: Teen Titans
9:30 PM: Naruto (x2)
10:30 PM: Bobobo-bo Bo-Bobo​
Pokemon and Storm Hawks are obviously the odd toons out, but most of You Are Here isn't all bad. Code Lyoko makes the jump from Miguzi, Ben 10 and Teen Titans stick around, and we get Naruto on both sides of Cartoon Network, plus Bobobo-bo gets a slot. But in all honesty, you're better off recording the premieres.
TO BE CONTINUED…?​
Okay, if you are going to continue this, I hope to see the following things:
  1. Cartoon Network getting a new primetime lineup on Mon-Thurs.
  2. Chowder and Adventure Time keeping the fort at CN proper alive.
  3. An example of Boomerang's lineup around this time.
And if it's not too much to ask, what does the Saturday and Sunday lineup consist of After Dark?
 

Aquagate - The Death of Williams Street, or, “What If The Boston Bomb Scare Affected Adult Swim More Directly?”​


January 31, 2007. A day that would live in infamy.

Lite Brites are hung up in major cities to promote Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters. Boston confused these Lite Brites for bombs. Half the city was shut down. Peter Berdovsky and Sean Stevens, the guys behind the stunt, were arrested. Cartoon Network had to pay $2 million to the city, and Jim Samples resigned as CN’s president. Stuart Snyder took his position, plunging CN into its dark age, an age filled with reality television.

In our timeline, Adult Swim themselves- technically a separate network from Cartoon Network by this time, a la Nick at Nite, and the ones who ACTUALLY broadcast the show based on the movie whose promotional campaign caused all this- got out unscathed. Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford kept their spots in charge of Williams Street. Aqua Teen Hunger Force continued its original run for seven more seasons. Adult Swim would continue as is and then expand, eventually seeing more hours than CN themselves. Even the original incarnation of Toonami, under Williams Street’s supervision and the infamous TOM 4 era, took over a year to die.

This is not our timeline.

Complete transcript of a phone call between Mike Lazzo and Michael Ouweleen, May 3, 2007

LAZZO
“Hey, Mike. What’s up?”

OUWELEEN
“Boss says everyone needs to clear the building and get out within two weeks. You’re all fired.”

LAZZO
“W-what? Why-”

OUWELEEN
“Don’t play dumb. You know exactly why.”

In this timeline, Stuart Snyder goes right to the source of the bomb scare. Effective immediately, Williams Street is closed down, their shows are cancelled across the board, and almost everyone is let go, including Lazzo and Crofford. I say almost, because Michael Ouweleen, after agreeing to publicly condemn Lazzo and Crofford and play by Snyder’s rules, was made vice president of CN. He would oversee the last few months of Adult Swim and Toonami, as well as their eventual replacements, and be an executive producer on Out of Jimmy’s Head after having previously done the same for its pilot film Re-Animated.

Toonami’s shutdown message

Toonami came to a close on September 15, 2007, the day after CN’s infamous “Fall” rebrand. What managed to last for a year and a half IOTL instead lasts only six months. The next night, September 16 and into the morning of the 17th, Adult Swim made its final broadcast. The bumps for that night were “themed” around the five stages of grief, a perfect fit for the loss of a beloved block.

10 PM: Stage One. Denial. Despite previous recent bumps stating otherwise, and the ominous countdown in the corner, Adult Swim denies that anything is wrong and that it was all just a misunderstanding, and they’re not REALLY going to shut down… right?

11 PM: Stage Two. Anger. The bumps devolve into no-punctuation all-caps screaming on a red BG, with ear-piercing static in place of music. They denounce Cartoon Network, Stuart Snyder, Berdovsky and Steven, the city of Boston, Boston police, police in general, the Aqua Teens, the Mooninites, “Michael” (who could be interpreted as either Mike Lazzo or Michael Ouweleen), and even the viewers themselves, all while spewing obscenities at a rate that would be funny if this all wasn’t so terrifying. Most humorously, the logo at both the end of the bumps and as a screen bug is also changed, resulting in the network being rebranded as [FUCK YOU] for two hours.

1 AM: Stage 3. Bargaining. The background is black once more, the all-caps is now all-lowercase, the BGM is now frantic Morse code, and the logo now ominously reading [help us]. The subject matter of the bumps turns to the network trying its best to survive, offering to cancel Aqua Teen and never air it again, or either dump all of its live action content or switch exclusively to live action content, and even turning to the viewers for help, telling them to avenge their death- all of which peppered with apologies.

3 AM: Stage 4. Depression. The bumps are now silent, and consist of the network in a spiral of depression and self-blame, stating phrases like “what’s the point” and “we brought it on ourselves” and “adult swim was a mistake”. The logo also becomes [fuck us], a tragic counterpoint to [FUCK YOU] from earlier.

5 AM: Stage 5. Acceptance. Adult Swim’s final hour sees things return to normal- the punctuation, the proper casing, the music, and the [adult swim] logo. It is a bittersweet return to form, and the bumps themselves become surprisingly wholesome and heartfelt, acknowledging their imminent demise with a “whatever will be will be” attitude- don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened. Of course, ever waggish, they also take potshots at Snyder for shutting them down and the city of Boston for overreacting so bad in the first place, before going “c’est la vie”. Also of note was a “special thanks” bump listing every creator and producer involved with Adult Swim.

The final thing that aired on Adult Swim was a brief return to the original “pool” bumpers, provided by Primal Screen.

LIFEGUARD (V.O.)
“Everyone out of the pool, Adult Swim is now closed.”

Unlike the regular pool bumpers, this final bumper includes characters from various Adult Swim shows leaving the pool alongside the senior citizens. And Ouwleen gets in one last potshot at Aqua Teen, the show that caused this debacle:

FRYLOCK
“Well, it’s as they say. All good things come to an end.”

SHAKE
“What the hell does that have to do with us?”

The final shot is of an empty pool, with the Adult Swim logo overlaid on top of the footage. The last words over this footage?

LIFEGUARD (V.O.)
“Alright everyone, good night. Goodbye. That means you, too.”

Cartoon Network then proceeded to start its day as normal, and continued to run until 11 PM, when viewers were introduced to Adult Swim’s replacement- Cartoon Network After Dark.

The concept of an adult programming slot on Cartoon Network was far too popular to just remove, especially with Futurama and Family Guy still bringing in the ratings. As such, Cartoon Network After Dark was quite similar to Adult Swim. It continued to run in its old timeslots (save the 10 PM hour on Sundays) and aired much of the same programming. It even continued to be considered its own network despite carrying the Cartoon Network name, much like Nick at Nite with Nickelodeon. However, there were several key differences between Adult Swim and Cartoon Network After Dark.

The first and most obvious would be the branding. CNAD’s branding was a mixture between the main CN’s current “Fall” branding in terms of aesthetics and the “City” branding in terms of concept, with characters roaming the streets at night, going to bars and strip clubs, and generally causing trouble. The logo was also not derived from the 2004 Cartoon Network logo being used at the time, but the original 1992 logo that was still being used in secondary purposes, with “After Dark” underneath it in neon tubing. A shortened “CNAD” version was used as a screen bug.

The second was the near-complete lack of Williams Street content. In addition to being completely shut down, Williams Street had its shows virtually purged from the airwaves, with three exceptions. One was Robot Chicken, a coproduction with Sony that moved over to Sony full time following the shutdown. The second was The Big O, an anime that Adult Swim only produced the second season of, and was otherwise licensed by Bandai. The third, and the most notorious, was Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law. While it had been cancelled before the shutdown due to production problems, it remained on the air at the behest of its creator… Michael Ouweleen. Mike Lazzo later bitterly called it “his reward for stabbing us in the back”.

As a result, Cartoon Network After Dark had to rely primarily on third-party series. This included quasi-originals Home Movies, The Boondocks, and the aforementioned Robot Chicken, as well as reruns of Futurama (until the contract ran out at the end of 2007), Family Guy, American Dad, Mission Hill, The Oblongs, and Baby Blues. Oh, and pretty much all of their anime. The only first-party original that survived was The Venture Bros., which was not a Williams Street production. This meant that Team Venture naturally became the face of Cartoon Network After Dark, by process of elimination.

The third difference is that, while it was always a subsidiary of Cartoon Network and despite being technically its own channel, CN and CNAS were essentially joined at the hip now. Ouweleen may have been in charge of the block, but Snyder ultimately called the shots. While obviously nothing TV-MA would ever air on daytime CN, shows would be shared and swapped between the day and night brands. TV-PG shows on both sides would be shared, resulting in Naruto becoming a fixture of After Dark, which also began airing films like Batman (1989) and Spider-Man (2002), and Futurama (at this point almost all PG episodes) briefly airing on CN. Gigantor, Voltron, and very late AS pickup Astro Boy moved to CN’s spinoff channel Boomerang, as did reruns of Dragon Ball Z, revitalizing the Boomeraction block. Pee-Wee’s Playhouse moved to daytime Cartoon Network, joining Goosebumps, Out of Jimmy’s Head, and TBS’s rights to Saved by the Bell in Snyder’s crusade to turn CN into a true Nickelodeon competitor, name of the network be damned.

WEEKNIGHT SCHEDULE AT LAUNCH
11 PM/2:30 AM: Futurama
11:30 PM/3 AM: Naruto
12 AM/3:30 AM: Family Guy
12:30 AM/4 AM: The Venture Bros.
1 AM/4:30 AM: Robot Chicken
1:15 AM/4:45 AM: Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law
1:30 AM/5 AM: Inuyasha
2 AM/5:30 AM: Home Movies

Toonami, meanwhile, had its replacement come on the 22nd, a week after its demise, in the form of You Are Here. It was basically Toonami, running in the same Saturday night timeslot, but more corporate-approved.

7 PM: Pokémon
7:30 PM: Code Lyoko
8 PM: Ben 10
8:30 PM: Storm Hawks
9 PM: Teen Titans
9:30 PM: Naruto (x2)
10:30 PM: Bobobo-bo Bo-Bobo

TO BE CONTINUED…?​
what the fuck?????

this....and I thought the way I did Nickelodeon in TL-2K23 and @Spooner The Trinity's Unus Annus TL were bad, this is tragic.

But I do like the Anger, Bargaining, Depression and Acceptance stages tho.

So like, will we get to see the Adult Swim/Williams Street shows again elsewhere? Oh, and what about Bleach, FLCL, Fullmetal Alchemist, Ghost In The Shell and Cowboy Bebop? And where's One Piece?

Overall, I give these bastard excuses of blocks until 2009-2010, then after that, Williams Street is GONNA HAVE to find a way to come back because I can't see this shit lasting long without CN getting killed.

Also, will the Toonami revival still happen? But under CN control? And TOM 4? TOM 4 was ALL Torchwood. Not Williams Street.

Also it's good all the anime survived. Don't know what I'd do otherwise

Overall, this shit scared me, and almost made me cry.
 
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Aquagate - The Death of Williams Street, or, “What If The Boston Bomb Scare Affected Adult Swim More Directly?”​


January 31, 2007. A day that would live in infamy.

Lite Brites are hung up in major cities to promote Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters. Boston confused these Lite Brites for bombs. Half the city was shut down. Peter Berdovsky and Sean Stevens, the guys behind the stunt, were arrested. Cartoon Network had to pay $2 million to the city, and Jim Samples resigned as CN’s president. Stuart Snyder took his position, plunging CN into its dark age, an age filled with reality television.

In our timeline, Adult Swim themselves- technically a separate network from Cartoon Network by this time, a la Nick at Nite, and the ones who ACTUALLY broadcast the show based on the movie whose promotional campaign caused all this- got out unscathed. Mike Lazzo and Keith Crofford kept their spots in charge of Williams Street. Aqua Teen Hunger Force continued its original run for seven more seasons. Adult Swim would continue as is and then expand, eventually seeing more hours than CN themselves. Even the original incarnation of Toonami, under Williams Street’s supervision and the infamous TOM 4 era, took over a year to die.

This is not our timeline.

Complete transcript of a phone call between Mike Lazzo and Michael Ouweleen, May 3, 2007

LAZZO
“Hey, Mike. What’s up?”

OUWELEEN
“Boss says everyone needs to clear the building and get out within two weeks. You’re all fired.”

LAZZO
“W-what? Why-”

OUWELEEN
“Don’t play dumb. You know exactly why.”

In this timeline, Stuart Snyder goes right to the source of the bomb scare. Effective immediately, Williams Street is closed down, their shows are cancelled across the board, and almost everyone is let go, including Lazzo and Crofford. I say almost, because Michael Ouweleen, after agreeing to publicly condemn Lazzo and Crofford and play by Snyder’s rules, was made vice president of CN. He would oversee the last few months of Adult Swim and Toonami, as well as their eventual replacements, and be an executive producer on Out of Jimmy’s Head after having previously done the same for its pilot film Re-Animated.

Toonami’s shutdown message

Toonami came to a close on September 15, 2007, the day after CN’s infamous “Fall” rebrand. What managed to last for a year and a half IOTL instead lasts only six months. The next night, September 16 and into the morning of the 17th, Adult Swim made its final broadcast. The bumps for that night were “themed” around the five stages of grief, a perfect fit for the loss of a beloved block.

10 PM: Stage One. Denial. Despite previous recent bumps stating otherwise, and the ominous countdown in the corner, Adult Swim denies that anything is wrong and that it was all just a misunderstanding, and they’re not REALLY going to shut down… right?

11 PM: Stage Two. Anger. The bumps devolve into no-punctuation all-caps screaming on a red BG, with ear-piercing static in place of music. They denounce Cartoon Network, Stuart Snyder, Berdovsky and Steven, the city of Boston, Boston police, police in general, the Aqua Teens, the Mooninites, “Michael” (who could be interpreted as either Mike Lazzo or Michael Ouweleen), and even the viewers themselves, all while spewing obscenities at a rate that would be funny if this all wasn’t so terrifying. Most humorously, the logo at both the end of the bumps and as a screen bug is also changed, resulting in the network being rebranded as [FUCK YOU] for two hours.

1 AM: Stage 3. Bargaining. The background is black once more, the all-caps is now all-lowercase, the BGM is now frantic Morse code, and the logo now ominously reading [help us]. The subject matter of the bumps turns to the network trying its best to survive, offering to cancel Aqua Teen and never air it again, or either dump all of its live action content or switch exclusively to live action content, and even turning to the viewers for help, telling them to avenge their death- all of which peppered with apologies.

3 AM: Stage 4. Depression. The bumps are now silent, and consist of the network in a spiral of depression and self-blame, stating phrases like “what’s the point” and “we brought it on ourselves” and “adult swim was a mistake”. The logo also becomes [fuck us], a tragic counterpoint to [FUCK YOU] from earlier.

5 AM: Stage 5. Acceptance. Adult Swim’s final hour sees things return to normal- the punctuation, the proper casing, the music, and the [adult swim] logo. It is a bittersweet return to form, and the bumps themselves become surprisingly wholesome and heartfelt, acknowledging their imminent demise with a “whatever will be will be” attitude- don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened. Of course, ever waggish, they also take potshots at Snyder for shutting them down and the city of Boston for overreacting so bad in the first place, before going “c’est la vie”. Also of note was a “special thanks” bump listing every creator and producer involved with Adult Swim.

The final thing that aired on Adult Swim was a brief return to the original “pool” bumpers, provided by Primal Screen.

LIFEGUARD (V.O.)
“Everyone out of the pool, Adult Swim is now closed.”

Unlike the regular pool bumpers, this final bumper includes characters from various Adult Swim shows leaving the pool alongside the senior citizens. And Ouwleen gets in one last potshot at Aqua Teen, the show that caused this debacle:

FRYLOCK
“Well, it’s as they say. All good things come to an end.”

SHAKE
“What the hell does that have to do with us?”

The final shot is of an empty pool, with the Adult Swim logo overlaid on top of the footage. The last words over this footage?

LIFEGUARD (V.O.)
“Alright everyone, good night. Goodbye. That means you, too.”

Cartoon Network then proceeded to start its day as normal, and continued to run until 11 PM, when viewers were introduced to Adult Swim’s replacement- Cartoon Network After Dark.

The concept of an adult programming slot on Cartoon Network was far too popular to just remove, especially with Futurama and Family Guy still bringing in the ratings. As such, Cartoon Network After Dark was quite similar to Adult Swim. It continued to run in its old timeslots (save the 10 PM hour on Sundays) and aired much of the same programming. It even continued to be considered its own network despite carrying the Cartoon Network name, much like Nick at Nite with Nickelodeon. However, there were several key differences between Adult Swim and Cartoon Network After Dark.

The first and most obvious would be the branding. CNAD’s branding was a mixture between the main CN’s current “Fall” branding in terms of aesthetics and the “City” branding in terms of concept, with characters roaming the streets at night, going to bars and strip clubs, and generally causing trouble. The logo was also not derived from the 2004 Cartoon Network logo being used at the time, but the original 1992 logo that was still being used in secondary purposes, with “After Dark” underneath it in neon tubing. A shortened “CNAD” version was used as a screen bug.

The second was the near-complete lack of Williams Street content. In addition to being completely shut down, Williams Street had its shows virtually purged from the airwaves, with three exceptions. One was Robot Chicken, a coproduction with Sony that moved over to Sony full time following the shutdown. The second was The Big O, an anime that Adult Swim only produced the second season of, and was otherwise licensed by Bandai. The third, and the most notorious, was Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law. While it had been cancelled before the shutdown due to production problems, it remained on the air at the behest of its creator… Michael Ouweleen. Mike Lazzo later bitterly called it “his reward for stabbing us in the back”.

As a result, Cartoon Network After Dark had to rely primarily on third-party series. This included quasi-originals Home Movies, The Boondocks, and the aforementioned Robot Chicken, as well as reruns of Futurama (until the contract ran out at the end of 2007), Family Guy, American Dad, Mission Hill, The Oblongs, and Baby Blues. Oh, and pretty much all of their anime. The only first-party original that survived was The Venture Bros., which was not a Williams Street production. This meant that Team Venture naturally became the face of Cartoon Network After Dark, by process of elimination.

The third difference is that, while it was always a subsidiary of Cartoon Network and despite being technically its own channel, CN and CNAS were essentially joined at the hip now. Ouweleen may have been in charge of the block, but Snyder ultimately called the shots. While obviously nothing TV-MA would ever air on daytime CN, shows would be shared and swapped between the day and night brands. TV-PG shows on both sides would be shared, resulting in Naruto becoming a fixture of After Dark, which also began airing films like Batman (1989) and Spider-Man (2002), and Futurama (at this point almost all PG episodes) briefly airing on CN. Gigantor, Voltron, and very late AS pickup Astro Boy moved to CN’s spinoff channel Boomerang, as did reruns of Dragon Ball Z, revitalizing the Boomeraction block. Pee-Wee’s Playhouse moved to daytime Cartoon Network, joining Goosebumps, Out of Jimmy’s Head, and TBS’s rights to Saved by the Bell in Snyder’s crusade to turn CN into a true Nickelodeon competitor, name of the network be damned.

WEEKNIGHT SCHEDULE AT LAUNCH
11 PM/2:30 AM: Futurama
11:30 PM/3 AM: Naruto
12 AM/3:30 AM: Family Guy
12:30 AM/4 AM: The Venture Bros.
1 AM/4:30 AM: Robot Chicken
1:15 AM/4:45 AM: Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law
1:30 AM/5 AM: Inuyasha
2 AM/5:30 AM: Home Movies

Toonami, meanwhile, had its replacement come on the 22nd, a week after its demise, in the form of You Are Here. It was basically Toonami, running in the same Saturday night timeslot, but more corporate-approved.

7 PM: Pokémon
7:30 PM: Code Lyoko
8 PM: Ben 10
8:30 PM: Storm Hawks
9 PM: Teen Titans
9:30 PM: Naruto (x2)
10:30 PM: Bobobo-bo Bo-Bobo

TO BE CONTINUED…?​
Holy crap you ended toonami early
 

Aquagate, Part 2 - The Dark Age of CN​

Going into 2008, things finally seemed to start sailing smoothly for the new late-night block. Futurama was gone, yes, but Family Guy continued to have strong ratings that almost single-handedly kept the block afloat. The Venture Bros., Robot Chicken, and The Boondocks continued to form the crux of the comedy lineup, and the anime lineup continued without a hitch. The crew behind Moral Orel even bargained for a similar deal to Robot Chicken (ShadowMachine produced both shows)- move over to Sony in exchange for the continuation of the series. Sony and Cartoon Network agreed. The aforementioned Robot Chicken trade-off with Sony resulted in a 3 year contract where Cartoon Network could have any animated series from Sony that wasn’t tied down to other networks, resulting in Dilbert and The Critic joining the After Dark lineup.

Meanwhile, Ouweleen was quite interested in Boomerang, and returning it to its roots. In addition to Astro Boy, Gigantor (which left in 2008), Voltron, and Dragon Ball Z, the Sony deal resulted in The Real Ghostbusters, Men in Black: The Series, and Totally Tooned In (a selection of UPA and Screen Gems cartoon shorts) joining the network, the latter in its US debut, while Batfink was renewed for longer. Similarly, a deal was made with Classic Media alongside the 2007 George of the Jungle series that resulted in Boomerang getting… pretty much everything. Casper and Friends, Godzilla, and The Mister Magoo Show returned (the latter retooled to feature the original theatrical shorts seen on Totally Tooned In), Voltron was further renewed, Rocky and Bullwinkle and Underdog kept airing through the Program Exchange, and in came He-Man, She-Ra, BraveStarr, Filmation’s Ghostbusters, The Archies, Fat Albert, Groovie Goolies, Felix the Cat, The King Kong Show, and The Mighty Hercules. Also, yet ANOTHER deal was made with Universal at the time of The Land Before Time TV show that resulted in classic Woody Woodpecker and Walter Lantz shorts joining the schedule as well, while a Cookie Jar deal alongside Johnny Test resulted in the additions of Inspector Gadget, The Super Mario Bros. Super Show, The Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog, and Heathcliff and the Cadillac Cats coming around. Meanwhile, everything under ten years old was removed, leaving Dexter’s Laboratory, Cow and Chicken, Johnny Bravo, and Men in Black as the newest series on the schedule, with The Powerpuff Girls and Sony’s Godzilla: The Series joining them. Oh, and Looney Tunes stayed on the schedule. CN’s dark age became Boomerang’s renaissance.

Speaking of which, Cartoon Network proper was going through its own changes. Overflow from Boomerang’s outcast “modern” series, resulted in, for one, Duck Dodgers, Justice League Unlimited, and The Batman rejoining the lineup. However, this also included Tickle U series Gerald McBoing-Boing and Krypto the Superdog, alongside Baby Looney Tunes, which Cartoon Network was already airing. These shows were packed with The Land Before Time, The Mr. Men Show, A Pup Named Scooby-Doo, and the returns of Ellen’s Acres and Harry and His Bucket Full of Dinosaurs, and Cookie Jar’s The Adventures of Paddington Bear and The Busy Workd of Richard Scarry, to launch the international brand Cartoonito in the United States. Running weekdays from 9 AM to 2 PM, this was yet another attempt for Cartoon Network at a preschool block.

Cartoonito bumper

INITIAL CARTOONITO LINEUP
9 AM: The Busy World of Richard Scarry
9:30 AM: The Adventures of Paddington Bear
10 AM: Baby Looney Tunes
10:30 AM: Ellen’s Acres
11 AM: The Land Before Time
11:30 AM: Harry and His Bucket Full of Dinosaurs
12 PM: The Mr. Men Show
12:30 PM: Gerald McBoing-Boing
1 PM: Krypto the Superdog
1:30 PM: A Pup Named Scooby-Doo

Movies also aired on Cartoonito every Friday at noon, with a mix of Tom and Jerry, Scooby-Doo, and The Land Before Time movies.

Meanwhile, Out of Jimmy’s Head proved a casualty of the 2007 Writers’ Strike, and Saved by the Bell was quickly removed. However, this didn’t stop Snyder’s plans for a live-action Cartoon Network. Pee-Wee’s Playhouse continued to air in the mornings just before Cartoonito, and Goosebumps also had a regular non-October slot on the schedule, and on weekdays at that. Meanwhile, two semi-original live-action shows premiered- My Spy Family, a Turner UK production that ITTL was picked up by the US channel (distributed by Decode Entertainment, which also resulted in Bromwell High joining the After Dark lineup), and Run It Back, a repurposing of Turner Sports NBA footage that ITTL was produced two years earlier. Another live-action acquisition, Classic Media’s British sitcom My Parents Are Aliens, also helped service the new live-action direction.

Intros to My Spy Family and My Parents Are Aliens

A limited selection of animated series also helped to keep that side of the network afloat, such as Ben 10: Alien Force, Chowder, The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack, and Hasbro co-production Transformers Animated (a move that also led to The Transformers and Beast Wars joining the Boomerang lineup, and G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero rejoining). The Sony deal meant that The Spectacular Spider-Man premiered on You Are Here instead of Kids‘ WB!, and TV-PG programs Total Drama Island and Star Wars: The Clone Wars would rerun on After Dark alongside the main channel.

YOU ARE HERE SCHEDULE, FALL 2008
7 PM: Batman: The Brave and the Bold
7:30 PM: The Spectacular Spider-Man
8 PM: Ben 10: Alien Force
8:30 PM: The Secret Saturdays
9 PM: Star Wars: The Clone Wars
9:30 PM: Naruto

The Noods rebrand still came to pass, and with it a similar rebrand to After Dark. It was almost identical to the daytime Noods branding, but with several differences. For one, it was on a dark background instead of a light one. And for another, the Noods were of shows on the After Dark lineup, obviously. More notably, the 1992 Cartoon Network checkerboard logo had been swapped out for the white Nood version of the 2004 CN logo, and the block was now being exclusively referred to as “CN After Dark”. Cartoon Network itself alternated between being called its full name and the CN acronym in promos, and the full name in question was GONE from the screen bug, just reading “CN”.

CN After Dark as a whole was actually doing surprisingly well at the time, even expanding into the 10 PM hour by the fall of 2008. While some were still bitter about the loss of Adult Swim, many had come to see it as an acceptable substitute. 2009 was set to be even better, with the addition of King of the Hill to the lineup and the revival of Moral Orel. Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law was also set to return as Harvey Birdman: Attorney General, produced by Cartoon Network Studios. Everything seemed to be going well for After Dark.

Then Mike Lazzo opened his mouth.

The tell-all blog post went viral, even ending up in mainstream news media. Lazzo told everything. How Snyder immediately shut down Williams Street and fired him for the actions of a few inept police officers. How Ouweleen had stabbed his friends in the back in exchange for his job and his precious Harvey Birdman. How Snyder was going to completely kill the Cartoon Network and replace it with a Nickelodeon clone, and how Ouweleen, executive producer of Re-Animated, had been in on it longer than even Snyder. And everything came crashing down.

Hatred for CN After Dark and You Are Here flared up like never before. Harvey Birdman’s reputation went from 100 to 0 almost overnight, becoming a symbol of greed and betrayal. Harvey Birdman: Attorney General in particular became one of the most hated shows on the planet, due to the circumstances surrounding its creation. Mainstream news (particularly CNN) tried to brush it all off and bring up Mike Lazzo’s role in the Boston bomb scare, but nobody bought it. Stephen Colbert, a prior mainstay on Harvey Birdman, publicly denounced the network and Ouweleen in particular on The Colbert Report. It was a PR nightmare that the Boston bomb scare could only dream of being.

Not helping matters was the fact that more and more live action programming started to flood in. Due to the existing live action lineup, the CN Real push isn’t as massive, and there is no CN Real block. However, Destroy Build Destroy, The Othersiders, and acquisition Survive This still came to the network, alongside the very trampoliney hybrid sport SlamBall. Meanwhile, After Dark started airing The Office. Not the UK version, as seen on Adult Swim IOTL. The US version, as seen on TBS at the time. Meanwhile, Sony live-action hybrid Sit Down, Shut Up was a disaster for After Dark. And classic animated hits like Ed, Edd n Eddy and The Grim Adventures with Billy and Mandy were being cancelled left and right, the latter accompanied by Ouweleen yelling at creator Maxwell Atoms about how his “hateful fart cartoon” ruined the network’s image (which ACTUALLY HAPPENED IOTL).

And to make matters worse, Lazzo and Keith Crofford had started producing their own shorts online. Their new website and YouTube channel, Aviso, took its name from a rejected name for Adult Swim. The brand was a mixture of live-action skits and Flash animated shorts, including series that were, for lack of a better word, legal friendly clones of previous Adult Swim series. Up Late with Spacehawk was Space Ghost: Coast to Coast with a public domain hero. Li’l Kitty Katty was The Brak Show with a girl who could be described as a mix of Brak and Zorak’s personalities mixed in a blender, with an extra dose of cutesy. Soul Quest Overdrive was Aqua Teen Hunger Force with religious fruit. The New Adventures of Clutch Cargo was Sealab 2021 with realistic human lips. Superjail was ITTL a rejected Adult Swim pilot that ultimately ended up on Aviso. Nevertheless, Aviso was a success, especially when Lazzo and Crofford made a deal with fellow Georgians The Brothers Chaps to host and coproduce Homestar Runner, and soon the brand even got a TV deal on FX, bringing in the FX original Archer, and soon picking up a select amount of anime as well. Many former Adult Swim viewers and After Dark haters flocked to Aviso in droves.

AVISO ON FX FRIDAY NIGHT SCHEDULE, SPRING 2009
10 PM: Homestar Runner
10:30 PM: Archer
11 PM: Superjail
11:15 PM: Li’l Kitty Katty
11:30 PM: Up Late with Spacehawk
11:45 PM: Soul Quest Overdrive
12 AM: Insert Anime of Choice Here
12:30 AM: The New Adventures of Clutch Cargo
12:45 AM: Aviso Presents (basically their one-shots and live-action stuff)

Things were BAD for Cartoon Network. Ratings were tanking, advertisers were fleeing, and something had to be done. At the end of 2009, Snyder and Ouweleen were fired, and on May 29, 2010, Cartoon Network went through yet another massive rebrand, with more massive changes. For starters, After Dark was no more, and Cartoon Network was 24 hours once again.

Not that they stopped airing adult programming. Family Guy was one of the few shows still receiving decent ratings, after all. But CN was about to return to its roots, and have its own renaissance… and in the process, bringing Boomerang’s to an abrupt end.

TO BE CONTINUED​
 
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Aquagate, Part 2 - The Dark Age of CN​

Going into 2008, things finally seemed to start sailing smoothly for the new late-night block. Futurama was gone, yes, but Family Guy continued to have strong ratings that almost single-handedly kept the block afloat. The Venture Bros., Robot Chicken, and The Boondocks continued to form the crux of the comedy lineup, and the anime lineup continued without a hitch. The crew behind Moral Orel even bargained for a similar deal to Robot Chicken (ShadowMachine produced both shows)- move over to Sony in exchange for the continuation of the series. Sony and Cartoon Network agreed. The aforementioned Robot Chicken trade-off with Sony resulted in a 3 year contract where Cartoon Network could have any animated series from Sony that wasn’t tied down to other networks, resulting in Dilbert and The Critic joining the After Dark lineup.

Meanwhile, Ouweleen was quite interested in Boomerang, and returning it to its roots. In addition to Astro Boy, Gigantor (which left in 2008), Voltron, and Dragon Ball Z, the Sony deal resulted in The Real Ghostbusters, Men in Black: The Series, and Totally Tooned In (a selection of UPA and Screen Gems cartoon shorts) joining the network, the latter in its US debut, while Batfink was renewed for longer. Similarly, a deal was made with Classic Media alongside the 2007 George of the Jungle series that resulted in Boomerang getting… pretty much everything. Casper and Friends, Godzilla, and The Mister Magoo Show returned (the latter retooled to feature the original theatrical shorts seen on Totally Tooned In), Voltron was further renewed, Rocky and Bullwinkle and Underdog kept airing through the Program Exchange, and in came He-Man, She-Ra, BraveStarr, Filmation’s Ghostbusters, The Archies, Fat Albert, Groovie Goolies, Felix the Cat, The King Kong Show, and The Mighty Hercules. Also, yet ANOTHER deal was made with Universal at the time of The Land Before Time TV show that resulted in classic Woody Woodpecker and Walter Lantz shorts joining the schedule as well, while a Cookie Jar deal alongside Johnny Test resulted in the additions of Inspector Gadget, The Super Mario Bros. Super Show, The Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog, and Heathcliff and the Cadillac Cats coming around. Meanwhile, everything under ten years old was removed, leaving Dexter’s Laboratory, Cow and Chicken, Johnny Bravo, and Men in Black as the newest series on the schedule, with The Powerpuff Girls and Sony’s Godzilla: The Series joining them. Oh, and Looney Tunes stayed on the schedule. CN’s dark age became Boomerang’s renaissance.

Speaking of which, Cartoon Network proper was going through its own changes. Overflow from Boomerang’s outcast “modern” series, resulted in, for one, Duck Dodgers, Justice League Unlimited, and The Batman rejoining the lineup. However, this also included Tickle U series Gerald McBoing-Boing and Krypto the Superdog, alongside Baby Looney Tunes, which Cartoon Network was already airing. These shows were packed with The Land Before Time, The Mr. Men Show, A Pup Named Scooby-Doo, and the returns of Ellen’s Acres and Harry and His Bucket Full of Dinosaurs, and Cookie Jar’s The Adventures of Paddington Bear and The Busy Workd of Richard Scarry, to launch the international brand Cartoonito in the United States. Running weekdays from 9 AM to 2 PM, this was yet another attempt for Cartoon Network at a preschool block.

Cartoonito bumper

INITIAL CARTOONITO LINEUP
9 AM: The Busy World of Richard Scarry
9:30 AM: The Adventures of Paddington Bear
10 AM: Baby Looney Tunes
10:30 AM: Ellen’s Acres
11 AM: The Land Before Time
11:30 AM: Harry and His Bucket Full of Dinosaurs
12 PM: The Mr. Men Show
12:30 PM: Gerald McBoing-Boing
1 PM: Krypto the Superdog
1:30 PM: A Pup Named Scooby-Doo

Movies also aired on Cartoonito every Friday at noon, with a mix of Tom and Jerry, Scooby-Doo, and The Land Before Time movies.

Meanwhile, Out of Jimmy’s Head proved a casualty of the 2007 Writers’ Strike, and Saved by the Bell was quickly removed. However, this didn’t stop Snyder’s plans for a live-action Cartoon Network. Pee-Wee’s Playhouse continued to air in the mornings just before Cartoonito, and Goosebumps also had a regular non-October slot on the schedule, and on weekdays at that. Meanwhile, two semi-original live-action shows premiered- My Spy Family, a Turner UK production that ITTL was picked up by the US channel (distributed by Decode Entertainment, which also resulted in Bromwell High joining the After Dark lineup), and Run It Back, a repurposing of Turner Sports NBA footage that ITTL was produced two years earlier. Another live-action acquisition, Classic Media’s British sitcom My Parents Are Aliens, also helped service the new live-action direction.

Intros to My Spy Family and My Parents Are Aliens

A limited selection of animated series also helped to keep that side of the network afloat, such as Ben 10: Alien Force, Chowder, The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack, and Hasbro co-production Transformers Animated (a move that also led to The Transformers and Beast Wars joining the Boomerang lineup, and G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero rejoining). The Sony deal meant that The Spectacular Spider-Man premiered on You Are Here instead of Kids‘ WB!, and TV-PG programs Total Drama Island and Star Wars: The Clone Wars would rerun on After Dark alongside the main channel.

YOU ARE HERE SCHEDULE, FALL 2008
7 PM: Batman: The Brave and the Bold
7:30 PM: The Spectacular Spider-Man
8 PM: Ben 10: Alien Force
8:30 PM: The Secret Saturdays
9 PM: Star Wars: The Clone Wars
9:30 PM: Naruto

The Noods rebrand still came to pass, and with it a similar rebrand to After Dark. It was almost identical to the daytime Noods branding, but with several differences. For one, it was on a dark background instead of a light one. And for another, the Noods were of shows on the After Dark lineup, obviously. More notably, the 1992 Cartoon Network checkerboard logo had been swapped out for the white Nood version of the 2004 CN logo, and the block was now being exclusively referred to as “CN After Dark”. Cartoon Network itself alternated between being called its full name and the CN acronym in promos, and the full name in question was GONE from the screen bug, just reading “CN”.

CN After Dark as a whole was actually doing surprisingly well at the time, even expanding into the 10 PM hour by the fall of 2008. While some were still bitter about the loss of Adult Swim, many had come to see it as an acceptable substitute. 2009 was set to be even better, with the addition of King of the Hill to the lineup and the revival of Moral Orel. Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law was also set to return as Harvey Birdman: Attorney General, produced by Cartoon Network Studios. Everything seemed to be going well for After Dark.

Then Mike Lazzo opened his mouth.

The tell-all blog post went viral, even ending up in mainstream news media. Lazzo told everything. How Snyder immediately shut down Williams Street and fired him for the actions of a few inept police officers. How Ouweleen had stabbed his friends in the back in exchange for his job and his precious Harvey Birdman. How Snyder was going to completely kill the Cartoon Network and replace it with a Nickelodeon clone, and how Ouweleen, executive producer of Re-Animated, had been in on it longer than even Snyder. And everything came crashing down.

Hatred for CN After Dark and You Are Here flared up like never before. Harvey Birdman’s reputation went from 100 to 0 almost overnight, becoming a symbol of greed and betrayal. Harvey Birdman: Attorney General in particular became one of the most hated shows on the planet, due to the circumstances surrounding its creation. Mainstream news (particularly CNN) tried to brush it all off and bring up Mike Lazzo’s role in the Boston bomb scare, but nobody bought it. Stephen Colbert, a prior mainstay on Harvey Birdman, publicly denounced the network and Ouweleen in particular on The Colbert Report. It was a PR nightmare that the Boston bomb scare could only dream of being.

Not helping matters was the fact that more and more live action programming started to flood in. Due to the existing live action lineup, the CN Real push isn’t as massive, and there is no CN Real block. However, Destroy Build Destroy, The Othersiders, and acquisition Survive This still came to the network, alongside the very trampoliney hybrid sport SlamBall. Meanwhile, After Dark started airing The Office. Not the UK version, as seen on Adult Swim IOTL. The US version, as seen on TBS at the time. Meanwhile, Sony live-action hybrid Sit Down, Shut Up was a disaster for After Dark. And classic animated hits like Ed, Edd n Eddy and The Grim Adventures with Billy and Mandy were being cancelled left and right, the latter accompanied by Ouweleen yelling at creator Maxwell Atoms about how his “hateful fart cartoon” ruined the network’s image (which ACTUALLY HAPPENED IOTL).

And to make matters worse, Lazzo and Keith Crofford had started producing their own shorts online. Their new website and YouTube channel, Aviso, took its name from a rejected name for Adult Swim. The brand was a mixture of live-action skits and Flash animated shorts, including series that were, for lack of a better word, legal friendly clones of previous Adult Swim series. Up Late with Spacehawk was Space Ghost: Coast to Coast with a public domain hero. Li’l Kitty Katty was The Brak Show with a girl who could be described as a mix of Brak and Zorak’s personalities mixed in a blender, with an extra dose of cutesy. Soul Quest Overdrive was Aqua Teen Hunger Force with religious fruit. The New Adventures of Clutch Cargo was Sealab 2021 with realistic human lips. Superjail was ITTL a rejected Adult Swim pilot that ultimately ended up on Aviso. Nevertheless, Aviso was a success, especially when Lazzo and Crofford made a deal with fellow Georgians The Brothers Chaps to host and coproduce Homestar Runner, and soon the brand even got a TV deal on FX, bringing in the FX original Archer, and soon picking up a select amount of anime as well. Many former Adult Swim viewers and After Dark haters flocked to Aviso in droves.

AVISO ON FX FRIDAY NIGHT SCHEDULE, SPRING 2009
10 PM: Homestar Runner
10:30 PM: Archer
11 PM: Superjail
11:15 PM: Li’l Kitty Katty
11:30 PM: Up Late with Spacehawk
11:45 PM: Soul Quest Overdrive
12 AM: Insert Anime of Choice Here
12:30 AM: The New Adventures of Clutch Cargo
12:45 AM: Aviso Presents (basically their one-shots and live-action stuff)

Things were BAD for Cartoon Network. Ratings were tanking, advertisers were fleeing, and something had to be done. At the end of 2009, Snyder and Ouweleen were fired, and on May 29, 2010, Cartoon Network went through yet another massive rebrand, with more massive changes. For starters, After Dark was no more, and Cartoon Network was 24 hours once again.

Not that they stopped airing adult programming. Family Guy was one of the few shows still receiving decent ratings, after all. But CN was about to return to its roots, and have its own renaissance… and in the process, bringing Boomerang’s to an abrupt end.

TO BE CONTINUED​
Okay... who is the new (wo)man behind CN and Boomerang?
 

Aquagate, Part 2 - The Dark Age of CN​

Going into 2008, things finally seemed to start sailing smoothly for the new late-night block. Futurama was gone, yes, but Family Guy continued to have strong ratings that almost single-handedly kept the block afloat. The Venture Bros., Robot Chicken, and The Boondocks continued to form the crux of the comedy lineup, and the anime lineup continued without a hitch. The crew behind Moral Orel even bargained for a similar deal to Robot Chicken (ShadowMachine produced both shows)- move over to Sony in exchange for the continuation of the series. Sony and Cartoon Network agreed. The aforementioned Robot Chicken trade-off with Sony resulted in a 3 year contract where Cartoon Network could have any animated series from Sony that wasn’t tied down to other networks, resulting in Dilbert and The Critic joining the After Dark lineup.​
That's good that those shows stick around and we get The Critic and Dilbert. Could those shows get revived? Oh, considering The Venture Bros' themes, could we have that show air with the anime to form a action block on CNAD? Also, I'm glad Moral Orel continues. Will CNAD acquire more anime around this time than AS did IOTL? I know of a few that'd fit YAH and CNAD. I'm shocked they didn't even try their hand at Devil May Cry IOTL?
Meanwhile, Ouweleen was quite interested in Boomerang, and returning it to its roots. In addition to Astro Boy, Gigantor (which left in 2008), Voltron, and Dragon Ball Z, the Sony deal resulted in The Real Ghostbusters, Men in Black: The Series, and Totally Tooned In (a selection of UPA and Screen Gems cartoon shorts) joining the network, the latter in its US debut, while Batfink was renewed for longer. Similarly, a deal was made with Classic Media alongside the 2007 George of the Jungle series that resulted in Boomerang getting… pretty much everything. Casper and Friends, Godzilla, and The Mister Magoo Show returned (the latter retooled to feature the original theatrical shorts seen on Totally Tooned In), Voltron was further renewed, Rocky and Bullwinkle and Underdog kept airing through the Program Exchange, and in came He-Man, She-Ra, BraveStarr, Filmation’s Ghostbusters, The Archies, Fat Albert, Groovie Goolies, Felix the Cat, The King Kong Show, and The Mighty Hercules. Also, yet ANOTHER deal was made with Universal at the time of The Land Before Time TV show that resulted in classic Woody Woodpecker and Walter Lantz shorts joining the schedule as well, while a Cookie Jar deal alongside Johnny Test resulted in the additions of Inspector Gadget, The Super Mario Bros. Super Show, The Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog, and Heathcliff and the Cadillac Cats coming around. Meanwhile, everything under ten years old was removed, leaving Dexter’s Laboratory, Cow and Chicken, Johnny Bravo, and Men in Black as the newest series on the schedule, with The Powerpuff Girls and Sony’s Godzilla: The Series joining them. Oh, and Looney Tunes stayed on the schedule. CN’s dark age became Boomerang’s renaissance.​
Ooh damn! I think I can take this in exchange for all the Hanna-Barbera stuff being gone. As long as the basics(Flintstones, Jetsons, Jonny Quest, Scooby, etc.) stuck around. In short, this is damn good. Almost gives me vibes that they'll relaunch the channel as a true Nick competitor and leave CN proper the fuck alone.
Speaking of which, Cartoon Network proper was going through its own changes. Overflow from Boomerang’s outcast “modern” series, resulted in, for one, Duck Dodgers, Justice League Unlimited, and The Batman rejoining the lineup. However, this also included Tickle U series Gerald McBoing-Boing and Krypto the Superdog, alongside Baby Looney Tunes, which Cartoon Network was already airing. These shows were packed with The Land Before Time, The Mr. Men Show, A Pup Named Scooby-Doo, and the returns of Ellen’s Acres and Harry and His Bucket Full of Dinosaurs, and Cookie Jar’s The Adventures of Paddington Bear and The Busy Workd of Richard Scarry, to launch the international brand Cartoonito in the United States. Running weekdays from 9 AM to 2 PM, this was yet another attempt for Cartoon Network at a preschool block.

Cartoonito bumper

INITIAL CARTOONITO LINEUP
9 AM: The Busy World of Richard Scarry
9:30 AM: The Adventures of Paddington Bear
10 AM: Baby Looney Tunes
10:30 AM: Ellen’s Acres
11 AM: The Land Before Time
11:30 AM: Harry and His Bucket Full of Dinosaurs
12 PM: The Mr. Men Show
12:30 PM: Gerald McBoing-Boing
1 PM: Krypto the Superdog
1:30 PM: A Pup Named Scooby-Doo

Movies also aired on Cartoonito every Friday at noon, with a mix of Tom and Jerry, Scooby-Doo, and The Land Before Time movies.​
This Cartoonito lineup looks decent and that's good that Boomerang's finally picking up steam. Does Boomerang grow in subscriptions?
Meanwhile, Out of Jimmy’s Head proved a casualty of the 2007 Writers’ Strike, and Saved by the Bell was quickly removed.​
Good.
However, this didn’t stop Snyder’s plans for a live-action Cartoon Network.​
Damn.
Pee-Wee’s Playhouse continued to air in the mornings just before Cartoonito, and Goosebumps also had a regular non-October slot on the schedule, and on weekdays at that. Meanwhile, two semi-original live-action shows premiered- My Spy Family, a Turner UK production that ITTL was picked up by the US channel (distributed by Decode Entertainment, which also resulted in Bromwell High joining the After Dark lineup), and Run It Back, a repurposing of Turner Sports NBA footage that ITTL was produced two years earlier. Another live-action acquisition, Classic Media’s British sitcom My Parents Are Aliens, also helped service the new live-action direction.

Intros to My Spy Family and My Parents Are Aliens
What night do these shows air?
A limited selection of animated series also helped to keep that side of the network afloat, such as Ben 10: Alien Force, Chowder, The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack, and Hasbro co-production Transformers Animated (a move that also led to The Transformers and Beast Wars joining the Boomerang lineup, and G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero rejoining). The Sony deal meant that The Spectacular Spider-Man premiered on You Are Here instead of Kids‘ WB!, and TV-PG programs Total Drama Island and Star Wars: The Clone Wars would rerun on After Dark alongside the main channel.​
Nice.
YOU ARE HERE SCHEDULE, FALL 2008
7 PM: Batman: The Brave and the Bold
7:30 PM: The Spectacular Spider-Man
8 PM: Ben 10: Alien Force
8:30 PM: The Secret Saturdays
9 PM: Star Wars: The Clone Wars
9:30 PM: Naruto​
So does YAH move to Fridays or stay on Saturdays? Also, does CN give Spider-Man another season? Also, does Naruto Shippuden join the lineup?
The Noods rebrand still came to pass, and with it a similar rebrand to After Dark. It was almost identical to the daytime Noods branding, but with several differences. For one, it was on a dark background instead of a light one. And for another, the Noods were of shows on the After Dark lineup, obviously. More notably, the 1992 Cartoon Network checkerboard logo had been swapped out for the white Nood version of the 2004 CN logo, and the block was now being exclusively referred to as “CN After Dark”. Cartoon Network itself alternated between being called its full name and the CN acronym in promos, and the full name in question was GONE from the screen bug, just reading “CN”.​
If they're separate, then why the hell do they have the exact same branding?
CN After Dark as a whole was actually doing surprisingly well at the time, even expanding into the 10 PM hour by the fall of 2008. While some were still bitter about the loss of Adult Swim, many had come to see it as an acceptable substitute. 2009 was set to be even better, with the addition of King of the Hill to the lineup and the revival of Moral Orel. Harvey Birdman: Attorney at Law was also set to return as Harvey Birdman: Attorney General, produced by Cartoon Network Studios. Everything seemed to be going well for After Dark.​
Nice! What about anime?
Then Mike Lazzo opened his mouth.​
???
The tell-all blog post went viral, even ending up in mainstream news media. Lazzo told everything. How Snyder immediately shut down Williams Street and fired him for the actions of a few inept police officers. How Ouweleen had stabbed his friends in the back in exchange for his job and his precious Harvey Birdman. How Snyder was going to completely kill the Cartoon Network and replace it with a Nickelodeon clone, and how Ouweleen, executive producer of Re-Animated, had been in on it longer than even Snyder. And everything came crashing down.​
Oh shit......
Hatred for CN After Dark and You Are Here flared up like never before. Harvey Birdman’s reputation went from 100 to 0 almost overnight, becoming a symbol of greed and betrayal. Harvey Birdman: Attorney General in particular became one of the most hated shows on the planet, due to the circumstances surrounding its creation. Mainstream news (particularly CNN) tried to brush it all off and bring up Mike Lazzo’s role in the Boston bomb scare, but nobody bought it. Stephen Colbert, a prior mainstay on Harvey Birdman, publicly denounced the network and Ouweleen in particular on The Colbert Report. It was a PR nightmare that the Boston bomb scare could only dream of being.​
Oh damn. Where is Turner and TimeWarner in all of this? Being careless like usual? Or does TW try to shut CN down itself?
Not helping matters was the fact that more and more live action programming started to flood in. Due to the existing live action lineup, the CN Real push isn’t as massive, and there is no CN Real block. However, Destroy Build Destroy, The Othersiders, and acquisition Survive This still came to the network, alongside the very trampoliney hybrid sport SlamBall.​
Not surprised.
Meanwhile, After Dark started airing The Office. Not the UK version, as seen on Adult Swim IOTL. The US version, as seen on TBS at the time. Meanwhile, Sony live-action hybrid Sit Down, Shut Up was a disaster for After Dark.​
Ah hell naw. Sit Down, Shut Up I could understand if it aired on Adult Swim IOTL, but considering TTL's circumstances, yeah, it deserves every bit of hate here.
And classic animated hits like Ed, Edd n Eddy and The Grim Adventures with Billy and Mandy were being cancelled left and right, the latter accompanied by Ouweleen yelling at creator Maxwell Atoms about how his “hateful fart cartoon” ruined the network’s image (which ACTUALLY HAPPENED IOTL).​
Here, Maxwell should jump ship, sue the fuck out of Ouweleen and join another network.
And to make matters worse, Lazzo and Keith Crofford had started producing their own shorts online. Their new website and YouTube channel, Aviso, took its name from a rejected name for Adult Swim. The brand was a mixture of live-action skits and Flash animated shorts, including series that were, for lack of a better word, legal friendly clones of previous Adult Swim series. Up Late with Spacehawk was Space Ghost: Coast to Coast with a public domain hero. Li’l Kitty Katty was The Brak Show with a girl who could be described as a mix of Brak and Zorak’s personalities mixed in a blender, with an extra dose of cutesy. Soul Quest Overdrive was Aqua Teen Hunger Force with religious fruit. The New Adventures of Clutch Cargo was Sealab 2021 with realistic human lips. Superjail was ITTL a rejected Adult Swim pilot that ultimately ended up on Aviso. Nevertheless, Aviso was a success, especially when Lazzo and Crofford made a deal with fellow Georgians The Brothers Chaps to host and coproduce Homestar Runner, and soon the brand even got a TV deal on FX, bringing in the FX original Archer, and soon picking up a select amount of anime as well. Many former Adult Swim viewers and After Dark haters flocked to Aviso in droves.​
That's huge! Newgrounds better make a similar deal with someone. Also, THIS IS G4, COMEDY CENTRAL, ABC FAMILY, MTV AND EVEN NICKELODEON'S CHANCE TO LOCK. THE. FUCK. IN.
AVISO ON FX FRIDAY NIGHT SCHEDULE, SPRING 2009
10 PM: Homestar Runner
10:30 PM: Archer
11 PM: Superjail
11:15 PM: Li’l Kitty Katty
11:30 PM: Up Late with Spacehawk
11:45 PM: Soul Quest Overdrive
12 AM: Insert Anime of Choice Here
12:30 AM: The New Adventures of Clutch Cargo
12:45 AM: Aviso Presents (basically their one-shots and live-action stuff)​
Damn. I'd watch every second of that. Even the Clutch Cargo reboot. I wonder if Aviso will get a spin-off channel, but more like old CN. Fox would be perfect for it. Buy Marvel and take all the Marvel cartoons, then acquire some good shit for the daytime, maybe even try to get the former Williams Street shows, and you have a network guaranteed to be huge. Oh, and what does Aviso's branding look like at this time?
Things were BAD for Cartoon Network. Ratings were tanking, advertisers were fleeing, and something had to be done.​
Damn............
At the end of 2009, Snyder and Ouweleen were fired, and on May 29, 2010, Cartoon Network went through yet another massive rebrand, with more massive changes. For starters, After Dark was no more, and Cartoon Network was 24 hours once again.​
Holy crap. What are the changes?
Not that they stopped airing adult programming. Family Guy was one of the few shows still receiving decent ratings, after all.​
What about Robot Chicken, The Boondocks, Moral Orel, and more importantly, the anime?
But CN was about to return to its roots, and have its own renaissance… and in the process, bringing Boomerang’s to an abrupt end.

TO BE CONTINUED​
Oh boy. This might actually have a good ending after all!
Okay... who is the new (wo)man behind CN and Boomerang?
Yeah. Who?

@TheFaultsofAlts
 
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