Pop-culture in TL-191

For BF1, I doubt it'd be anything bigger than a location change. Maybe swap out the Western Front for the Roanoke Front? There would probably be no Gallipoli campaign, which was always my favourite war story. I wonder what would take the place of the Arditi campaign (You know, the one where you wear armour and have a minigun, which was nothing like the actual Arditi?)
I can see the Arditi equivalent possibly being through an Ottoman POV. And maybe a campaign focusing on the Red Rebellion in the South?
 
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A T-Doll (or referred to as fans as a Rifouse) carrying the Tredegar Automatic Rifle from the French produced mobile-phone game called Première Ligne de Filles or Girls Frontline. The game would first be released in 2016 for both iOS and Android in France, later in 2017 would be released in England, Italy, Switzerland, and Belgium, and by 2018 for the rest of Europe. The game is a strategy role-playing game set in the future where the player controls echelons of androids, known in universe as T-Dolls, each carrying a distinctive firearm. Some of the notable guns in-game are the FAMAS, Erma MP-2000, Tredegar Automatic Rifle M1937, Type-14, MAB 38, and the M1986 Assault Carbine. An animé television series adaptation made by CAT is expected to premiere sometime in the summer of 2021.

Fans of Première Ligne de Filles have developed their own term for the characters in the game, for which this term is Rifouse*.

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* = The term Rifouse is derived from the popular term 'l éspouse used by animé fans, which in turn 'l éspouse is the French word for wife.
I find it interesting that your used type 63 To represent the Tredegar Automatic Rifle
 
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Alright, here's my attempt at continuing the TL 191 call of duty series:

Call of Duty Black Ops
Set during the 1960s during the Ice war between the United States and the Empire of Japan. More to come later (maybe)
Call of Duty Modern Warfare series
The Modern Warfare series is a trilogy of games that put the Call of Duty series on the map. The main focus is on two different national viewpoints: One America and One German. In the first game, the primary conflict is the American Civil War, which sees a new southron movement taking power and attempting to break away like their predecessors, led by one Ian Zachary. In the second game, the South has once again succeeded and become an independent nation state, albeit one in a state of high tension with it's northern neighbor. This tension evolves into open warfare after a wanted terrorist by the name of Walter Markus tricks an undercover northern operative into going along with his plan to shoot up a southern airport. The third game focuses on the war that came as a result.
Call of Duty Black Ops Tournament of Shadows
Call of Duty Black Ops Silent Struggle is set during the Tournament of Shadows (or second ice war), a time period in the 80s where tensions were strained between the United States of America, the German Empire, and the Empire of Japan. The main plot involves a rogue Japanese agent by the name of "Izanami," who seeks to destabilize the two western powers and set up the Empire of Japan as the world hegemon by taking control of the two countries Superbomb arsenals and detonating them, travelling throughout the world to find him and his agents, from Manchukuo to South America. On the side, however, are special missions involving the other side of the ToS between the US and Germany, in which the player must deal with German General Timma Zolas, A high ranking German military leader, leader of the his own European-based alliance called "The Weltsystem," and an uncontrollable megalomaniac who is bent on gaining the allegiance of Russia and securing German dominance over Europe via political expansion, but also maintaining a strong Anti-American stance.

The game is unique in that it presents alternate endings depending on the choices made in the game. If the player chooses to ignore the side missions and allows the Weltsystem to expand, then Zolas will effectively seize control of the German Army and begin to strain ties with the US even more, and by the end of the game, the US and Germany will enter a new Ice War with strained relations. If the player manages to complete all of the side missions, then Zolas will be killed in the final side mission after the German government decides they've had enough of his sabre rattling, resulting in moderates maintaining control in the German Empire and leading to them joining in on the final attack Izanami's base. Depending on weather or not the Germans and the US cooperate on the final mission, Izanami will either escape and disappear (Without German help) or be captured by the US and German forces (with German help). If he is captured, the ending will leave his fate ambiguous.

However, there is also another option that can be taken. Near the end of the campaign, it is discovered that the player character was actually Izanami's brainwashed second in command. If the player chooses, they can instead rejoin Izanami and plan an ambush, resulting in his plan succeeding and detonating the Superbombs of the US and Germany, sending both North America and Europe into Anarchy. Izanami then has his sleeper agents and other puppets in America and Europe take positions of power in the now broken nations and form new nations sympathetic to the Empire of Japan (in the US's case) or seize leadership in the surviving countries, while also bringing Japan itself more in line with Izanami's more radical worldview, securing Imperial Japanese dominance as the world hegemon. However, if the player failed to stop Zolas, then he will have uncovered the plan and prevented their detonation in German Europe, but leaving the US to die. The ending monologue then shows that Zolas's aggressive rhetoric has grown (with a side by side shot of him and Featherston giving a speech in two recordings for comparison, just to rub it in) and that under his rule, the German Empire is mobilizing for war against the Japanese, one which the world may not survive.
 
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A rather slapdash replica of a Confederate Mk. II Barrel, built on the chassis of a US "Custer" Barrel, seen in a military reenactment in the early 2000's. Two men portraying Freedom Party Guardsmen are in the foreground.
Military reenactments grew in remarkable popularity in the latter half of the 20th Century, as the generations born post-war wished to learn of the scope and scale of the near-century-long struggle between the USA and CSA. Most such affairs would include portrayals of battles from the War of Secession through the Second Great War, in varying degrees of intensity. In the early days, groups would at times struggle to accurately equip their soldiers, never mind heavy equipment, but by the turn of the century some groups would have small arsenals of restored Union and Confederate Equipment, up to and including Barrels and Aircraft.

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a US M40 "Morrel" Barrel Mocked up as a Confederate Mk. III "Crockett" in the film "Pittsburgh" (1980)
Regarded as one of the last great War epics that came out of the post-Confederate era, the movie was an attempt to recapture the feeling of the war epics of the 1940's and 50's, while "playing fair" to both sides of the conflict in representation: on the Confederate Side, few of the "rebs" are portrayed in the stereotype of the raging freedomite and racist, while on the Union side the traditional heroic portrayal of the troops is pushed off to show the human character flaws.

In the end, the film was a bust at the box office, and is regarded as the "final coffin nail" for big-budget war movies in the USA.
 
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A 1/35 scale Diorama of Confederate Army Soldiers with a knocked out Mark III Crockett during the Battle of Chattanooga.
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Boxart for a 1/48 scale FW-190 from the Model Company Eduard.

Since it's inception in the 1930s, plastic model building is a hobby where people construct scaled down replicas of objects (both real-world and from fiction,) such as aircraft, vehicles, ships, spacecraft, figures, and robots. Some manufactures of these scale models include the American companies of Monogram and Lindberg, Airfix from the UK, Eduard (Danubian Federation), Revell (Germany), Fujimi (Japan), and Heller (France). In addition, a strong after-market exists where photo-eteched parts are sold to make a kit or a diorama more detailed.
 
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The Cover of the paperback edition of Alternative History writer Harold Bridlequail's first major novel, The Guns of the North, set in an alternative universe where the Union wins the War of Secession with the assistance of "the Battersea Men" a group of strange, hardline abolitionists, both Black and White, from the backwoods of upstate Maine, who go so far as to espouse pro-racial equality views.
Despite private disagreements with the less-than-agreeing Union officials, the group does provide President Lincoln's hard-pressed forces with a new asset to give them an edge over the CSA: the Vz.58, a rifle with, among other things, a hitherto unheard of automatic fire function and ammunition that produces next to no smoke. Other assets soon follow, in the form of 'miracle medicines' that treat battlefield wounds and miniball-stopping "Flapjack" body-armor. Furthermore, at the impetus of the Battersea Men, black regiments are armed, trained and sent to the front lines, which drastically improves both Union troop numbers and national morale, thanks to some careful journalism influencing the public to see the Blacks as heroic defenders of their own freedom.

General McCellan, as well as President Lincoln, soon discover the truth about these strange benefactors: they are in fact time-travelers from the distant future year of 2014, who claim to come from a world where the CSA won the "War of Secession" and imposed a harsh and vindictive peace upon the Union which has carried on into the 21st Century. What's more, treatment of blacks in the south becomes even worse than in the present, to the point of mass extermination, to Lincoln's horror when he is presented evidence of the Population Reduction camps. The first half of the book ends with, thanks to information provided by the Battersea Men, a crushing CSA defeat at Antietam when McClellan is able to ambush Robert E. Lee and decisively smash the Army of Northern Virginia. In addition to the military victory, a Propaganda coup unfolds when Lee is himself captured by the Colored troops of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment.

Things do not improve for the Confederacy: With the loss of the Army of Northern Virginia and General Lee, by the end of 1863, with the new rifles and the increased troop strength thanks to the Black regiments, Richmond falls and Army of Tennessee commander Joseph Johnston is forced to surrender his battered army. Jefferson Davis is caught fleeing the city by Colored troops, and is almost lynched before Union General Ulysses S. Grant stops them.

The Battersea men soon reveal their true colors, however: under scrutiny by General Grant and General Meade, it is soon discovered that the stories of Confederate triumph are untrue, and that by the future year of 2014 the CSA is long defunct after a penultimate Union victory in 1944. Confronted with this, the Battersea men reveal that their world is wracked with racial tension, and things have most certainly not improved for Blacks.
"it's not enough for the government to give Black men their freedom. the People need to let them embrace that freedom, the way White people have. And the white folks in the future most definitely haven't. We're still seen as second-class citizens, treated like criminals, poor, uneducated, and worst of all, we're still hated. All thanks to years of pro-CSA propaganda that you Yankees drank up like a life saving tonic. You turned around and put CSA leaders and officials back in power, and literally the first thing they did was change the laws so that, sure, Slavery was gone, but blacks were still oppressed."

Things come to a head when, after Lincoln is reelected in 1864 on a position of "Binding up the Nation's Wounds" despite the intentions of the Battersea men to see the former CSA punished by having General McClellan elected, several of their number attempt to assassinate him at his inauguration. They fail, however, thanks to a prescient Lincoln wearing "Flapjack" armor under his suit. However, the bloodbath lays the truth wide open for all to see, and Battersea is soon under siege by Union forces. Here the troops are faced with new battlefield terrors: "Endless Repeaters" that never seem to run out of bullets, Artillery pieces that outrange the heaviest field gun, "Land-Torpedoes" that explode under the men's feet as they step on them, and "talking Wireless" that allow the Battersea men to communicate instantly. it takes some CSA-sourced devilry courtesy of Former Confederate General Patrick Cleburne, who manages to orchestrate a strategy with the help of Union engineers to blow a hole in the Battersea Men's front line, which is subsequently exploited by US cavalry. The Battersea men's time machine is destroyed in the fighting, leaving several of their number trapped in 1864.

At the end of the battle, as the goods and materials from the future are studied and analyzed by Union scientists, the remaining Battersea men reluctantly agree to help the Union maintain their military advantage over the North American continent: Britain has been making moves in Canada, and the French intervention into Mexico is threatening to boil over into a war, aided by a number of ex-CSA agitators who fled to the embattled country after the CSA's defeat. As the first wells for "Liquid Coal" are tapped in Pennsylvania and the first steel mills are constructed in Pittsburgh, President Lincoln ponders on his legacy as he studies a photograph from the Battersea men's timeline of him giving a speech at a socialist rally.


the novel is derided in some circles for portraying President Lincoln in too positive a light, and for giving a prominent CSA figure a major role in the story's conclusion.
 
View attachment 627073

The Cover of the paperback edition of Alternative History writer Harold Bridlequail's first major novel, The Guns of the North, set in an alternative universe where the Union wins the War of Secession with the assistance of "the Battersea Men" a group of strange, hardline abolitionists, both Black and White, from the backwoods of upstate Maine, who go so far as to espouse pro-racial equality views.
Despite private disagreements with the less-than-agreeing Union officials, the group does provide President Lincoln's hard-pressed forces with a new asset to give them an edge over the CSA: the Vz.58, a rifle with, among other things, a hitherto unheard of automatic fire function and ammunition that produces next to no smoke. Other assets soon follow, in the form of 'miracle medicines' that treat battlefield wounds and miniball-stopping "Flapjack" body-armor. Furthermore, at the impetus of the Battersea Men, black regiments are armed, trained and sent to the front lines, which drastically improves both Union troop numbers and national morale, thanks to some careful journalism influencing the public to see the Blacks as heroic defenders of their own freedom.

General McCellan, as well as President Lincoln, soon discover the truth about these strange benefactors: they are in fact time-travelers from the distant future year of 2014, who claim to come from a world where the CSA won the "War of Secession" and imposed a harsh and vindictive peace upon the Union which has carried on into the 21st Century. What's more, treatment of blacks in the south becomes even worse than in the present, to the point of mass extermination, to Lincoln's horror when he is presented evidence of the Population Reduction camps. The first half of the book ends with, thanks to information provided by the Battersea Men, a crushing CSA defeat at Antietam when McClellan is able to ambush Robert E. Lee and decisively smash the Army of Northern Virginia. In addition to the military victory, a Propaganda coup unfolds when Lee is himself captured by the Colored troops of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment.

Things do not improve for the Confederacy: With the loss of the Army of Northern Virginia and General Lee, by the end of 1863, with the new rifles and the increased troop strength thanks to the Black regiments, Richmond falls and Army of Tennessee commander Joseph Johnston is forced to surrender his battered army. Jefferson Davis is caught fleeing the city by Colored troops, and is almost lynched before Union General Ulysses S. Grant stops them.

The Battersea men soon reveal their true colors, however: under scrutiny by General Grant and General Meade, it is soon discovered that the stories of Confederate triumph are untrue, and that by the future year of 2014 the CSA is long defunct after a penultimate Union victory in 1944. Confronted with this, the Battersea men reveal that their world is wracked with racial tension, and things have most certainly not improved for Blacks.
"it's not enough for the government to give Black men their freedom. the People need to let them embrace that freedom, the way White people have. And the white folks in the future most definitely haven't. We're still seen as second-class citizens, treated like criminals, poor, uneducated, and worst of all, we're still hated. All thanks to years of pro-CSA propaganda that you Yankees drank up like a life saving tonic. You turned around and put CSA leaders and officials back in power, and literally the first thing they did was change the laws so that, sure, Slavery was gone, but blacks were still oppressed."

Things come to a head when, after Lincoln is reelected in 1864 on a position of "Binding up the Nation's Wounds" despite the intentions of the Battersea men to see the former CSA punished by having General McClellan elected, several of their number attempt to assassinate him at his inauguration. They fail, however, thanks to a prescient Lincoln wearing "Flapjack" armor under his suit. However, the bloodbath lays the truth wide open for all to see, and Battersea is soon under siege by Union forces. Here the troops are faced with new battlefield terrors: "Endless Repeaters" that never seem to run out of bullets, Artillery pieces that outrange the heaviest field gun, "Land-Torpedoes" that explode under the men's feet as they step on them, and "talking Wireless" that allow the Battersea men to communicate instantly. it takes some CSA-sourced devilry courtesy of Former Confederate General Patrick Cleburne, who manages to orchestrate a strategy with the help of Union engineers to blow a hole in the Battersea Men's front line, which is subsequently exploited by US cavalry. The Battersea men's time machine is destroyed in the fighting, leaving several of their number trapped in 1864.

At the end of the battle, as the goods and materials from the future are studied and analyzed by Union scientists, the remaining Battersea men reluctantly agree to help the Union maintain their military advantage over the North American continent: Britain has been making moves in Canada, and the French intervention into Mexico is threatening to boil over into a war, aided by a number of ex-CSA agitators who fled to the embattled country after the CSA's defeat. As the first wells for "Liquid Coal" are tapped in Pennsylvania and the first steel mills are constructed in Pittsburgh, President Lincoln ponders on his legacy as he studies a photograph from the Battersea men's timeline of him giving a speech at a socialist rally.


the novel is derided in some circles for portraying President Lincoln in too positive a light, and for giving a prominent CSA figure a major role in the story's conclusion.
Not bad, man.

The "future history" of your version of TL-191 post-1944 sounds very interesting with a lot of questions.

I assume that Harold Bridlequail (nice name, by the way!) is your version of Turtledove in TL-191?
 
View attachment 627073

The Cover of the paperback edition of Alternative History writer Harold Bridlequail's first major novel, The Guns of the North, set in an alternative universe where the Union wins the War of Secession with the assistance of "the Battersea Men" a group of strange, hardline abolitionists, both Black and White, from the backwoods of upstate Maine, who go so far as to espouse pro-racial equality views.
Despite private disagreements with the less-than-agreeing Union officials, the group does provide President Lincoln's hard-pressed forces with a new asset to give them an edge over the CSA: the Vz.58, a rifle with, among other things, a hitherto unheard of automatic fire function and ammunition that produces next to no smoke. Other assets soon follow, in the form of 'miracle medicines' that treat battlefield wounds and miniball-stopping "Flapjack" body-armor. Furthermore, at the impetus of the Battersea Men, black regiments are armed, trained and sent to the front lines, which drastically improves both Union troop numbers and national morale, thanks to some careful journalism influencing the public to see the Blacks as heroic defenders of their own freedom.

General McCellan, as well as President Lincoln, soon discover the truth about these strange benefactors: they are in fact time-travelers from the distant future year of 2014, who claim to come from a world where the CSA won the "War of Secession" and imposed a harsh and vindictive peace upon the Union which has carried on into the 21st Century. What's more, treatment of blacks in the south becomes even worse than in the present, to the point of mass extermination, to Lincoln's horror when he is presented evidence of the Population Reduction camps. The first half of the book ends with, thanks to information provided by the Battersea Men, a crushing CSA defeat at Antietam when McClellan is able to ambush Robert E. Lee and decisively smash the Army of Northern Virginia. In addition to the military victory, a Propaganda coup unfolds when Lee is himself captured by the Colored troops of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment.

Things do not improve for the Confederacy: With the loss of the Army of Northern Virginia and General Lee, by the end of 1863, with the new rifles and the increased troop strength thanks to the Black regiments, Richmond falls and Army of Tennessee commander Joseph Johnston is forced to surrender his battered army. Jefferson Davis is caught fleeing the city by Colored troops, and is almost lynched before Union General Ulysses S. Grant stops them.

The Battersea men soon reveal their true colors, however: under scrutiny by General Grant and General Meade, it is soon discovered that the stories of Confederate triumph are untrue, and that by the future year of 2014 the CSA is long defunct after a penultimate Union victory in 1944. Confronted with this, the Battersea men reveal that their world is wracked with racial tension, and things have most certainly not improved for Blacks.
"it's not enough for the government to give Black men their freedom. the People need to let them embrace that freedom, the way White people have. And the white folks in the future most definitely haven't. We're still seen as second-class citizens, treated like criminals, poor, uneducated, and worst of all, we're still hated. All thanks to years of pro-CSA propaganda that you Yankees drank up like a life saving tonic. You turned around and put CSA leaders and officials back in power, and literally the first thing they did was change the laws so that, sure, Slavery was gone, but blacks were still oppressed."

Things come to a head when, after Lincoln is reelected in 1864 on a position of "Binding up the Nation's Wounds" despite the intentions of the Battersea men to see the former CSA punished by having General McClellan elected, several of their number attempt to assassinate him at his inauguration. They fail, however, thanks to a prescient Lincoln wearing "Flapjack" armor under his suit. However, the bloodbath lays the truth wide open for all to see, and Battersea is soon under siege by Union forces. Here the troops are faced with new battlefield terrors: "Endless Repeaters" that never seem to run out of bullets, Artillery pieces that outrange the heaviest field gun, "Land-Torpedoes" that explode under the men's feet as they step on them, and "talking Wireless" that allow the Battersea men to communicate instantly. it takes some CSA-sourced devilry courtesy of Former Confederate General Patrick Cleburne, who manages to orchestrate a strategy with the help of Union engineers to blow a hole in the Battersea Men's front line, which is subsequently exploited by US cavalry. The Battersea men's time machine is destroyed in the fighting, leaving several of their number trapped in 1864.

At the end of the battle, as the goods and materials from the future are studied and analyzed by Union scientists, the remaining Battersea men reluctantly agree to help the Union maintain their military advantage over the North American continent: Britain has been making moves in Canada, and the French intervention into Mexico is threatening to boil over into a war, aided by a number of ex-CSA agitators who fled to the embattled country after the CSA's defeat. As the first wells for "Liquid Coal" are tapped in Pennsylvania and the first steel mills are constructed in Pittsburgh, President Lincoln ponders on his legacy as he studies a photograph from the Battersea men's timeline of him giving a speech at a socialist rally.


the novel is derided in some circles for portraying President Lincoln in too positive a light, and for giving a prominent CSA figure a major role in the story's conclusion.
Awesome piece man, well done.
 
Not bad, man.

The "future history" of your version of TL-191 post-1944 sounds very interesting with a lot of questions.

I assume that Harold Bridlequail (nice name, by the way!) is your version of Turtledove in TL-191?
well, looking at our own history, stuff doesn't just get "fixed" because the CSA lost. ex-Confederates are gonna live for a LONG time and they're gonna carry their prejudices with them. the USA is either going to have to put some local authority in place or keep troops in the ex-CSA forever, so sooner or later SOMEONE who wore a Freedom Party badge is going to get back into a position of authority.

and yes indeed. as a "Turtledove" is what's known as an "Old World" bird, a "Bridle Quail" is a "new world" bird, so it's a bit of a tongue in cheek reference.
 
and yes indeed. as a "Turtledove" is what's known as an "Old World" bird, a "Bridle Quail" is a "new world" bird, so it's a bit of a tongue in cheek reference.
I had a tough time trying to come up with a name for a TL-191 version of Turtledove, but I chose something based on the "Twelve Days of Christmas" song.
♪...three french hens, two turtledoves... ♪ ====> Larry Frenchen.

I know, I know. It's not that impressive. Probably more dumb than anything else. :p
 
Alternate Idea for a Man in the High Castle series: It's set in Britain or France, but it revolves around how, despite winning the war, they have effectively been eclipsed by the far more powerful Confederacy to the west and Russia to the East.
 
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