Politicians that could have lived longer

A very popular one would be Alexander Hamilton. But I always wonder what if Turgut Ozal lived longer? He was the Turkish president and revived the economy, was incorruptible, built the Turkish tourist industry, and attempted to broker peace with the Kurds since he was half Kurdish. However, factions such as the army started to distrust him more and more until eventually, he died in office. The public was outraged but the army blocked any attempt for an autopsy, saying it was "medical issues". It wasn't until the 2010s was his body finally checked that it was confirmed he was poisoned.

There was also this Taiwanese politician, forgot his name, who wanted Taiwan to be democratic but Chiang imprisoned him. He eventually died and sadly the memoirs that he wrote were destroyed under orders from Chiang. So I wonder if Chiang died early and his son, Chiang Ching-Kuo, became dictator would he have let the man free? He also was a dictator but one who laid the foundations for democracy in Taiwan.
 

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Ramon Magsaysay - Philippine President 1953-57 (Our Philippine members will have more to offer on this fellow). A progressive leader in the early years of the Philippine Republic. Killed in a plane crash.
 
Not a politician, but one that could certainly have an impact on politics is Kaiser Friedrich III.
At first, he would be at odds with Bismarck but he'd be the emperor and as such, in 1910s Germany he would have the power to influence the politics (read: foreign policy) of the country and very probably steer his nation in a much different path than OTL. Looking at the way OTL WW1 shaped the 20th -and 21st- centuries, the amount of butterflies here is gargantuan.
In classic If it had happened otherwise - If the Emperor Frederick had not had cancer
 
King Alexander of Greece is another example, since he died thanks a rabid monkey bite, with him in place, and not his father, Grece could perform better in the Greek-Turkish war, we can avoid the 1924 revolution, and even Metaxas dictatorship. If he can have male offsprings we will have very different Glucksburg dinasty on the throne, and maybe a better Greece, today other then a monarchical one.
 
Wendell Wilkie only died when he was 52 and died of a heart attack, he had been a smoker but he easily could have 10 years added onto his life.

LBJ only died when he was 64, surprising young for a person who looked so old, if he gave up the cigs he probably would've lived much longer. Nixon and LBJ apparently were great friends, so I wonder how he would react to the Watergate scandal.

I wonder how the population would react to the scandals of Harding if he was alive. The scandals started being uncovered only a month after he died.

The Nepalese Royal Massacre pretty much ended the Monarchy of Nepal as pretty much the entire royal line of succession died and Nepal got stuck with Gyanendra who ended up unifying the nation against him.

King Alexander I not being assassinated. He clearly opposed or feared Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany and was the biggest proponent for the Balkan Pact of Yugoslavia, Romania, and Greece before the Hungarian unraveling of the Treaty of Trianon. He also hated the Ushtashe, hence why he was assassinated If he had lived maybe Yugoslavia and the Balkan countries would have together organised resistance against Axis states or Fascist expansion, instead of being forced into alliances or invaded.
 
Olof Palme was assassinated when he was 59, he would have died somewhere in the late 2000s/early 2010s. His survival could have possibly led to the Social Democrats losing in 1988, given that Palme was personally unpopular among the Swedish right-wing, a level of hatred for a politician not seen since. I believe he was also unpopular in some factions of his own party by 1986, there was a leftist local break-away from the main party that demanded his resignation just a month before his assassination. His legacy would also have been affected, he would not be as lionized as he is today. There was also some talk that he wanted to be Secretary-General of the United Nations at some point, although the US would probably veto that.

John Smith would have probably have led Labour to victory in 1997 as Blair did OTL although it would not have been that large of a landslide, but his premiership would have been different, I do not think he would have gotten involved in the Iraq War as Blair did. His heart issues would have most likely continued possibly leading to his death in office or resigning for health reasons (circa 2002-2005 maybe). The Granita Pact would not happen.

Anwar Sadat was at the height of his unpopularity in 1981, and he had suppressed a coup that year as well. Mubarak probably is kept as Vice President unless something dramatic happens as Sadat appeared to trust him. He also had heart attacks previously so he may still die in the 1980s.

Park Chung-hee, although he probably wouldn't have lived much longer, maybe 15 years more, since his mother had lived until her late seventies. How is democratization affected? The Yushin System goes on until the death of Park in around 1994. How does he react to the explosion of protests, as they were escalating before he died? Gwangju probably doesn't happen as OTL but there will be protests against Park.
 
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A few airplane related deaths;
Eduardo Campos. He was running in 2014 for the Brazilian Socialist Party, he could have won.

Juan Camilo Mourino was the Interior Secretary of Mexico and a rising star. If he were a candidate in 2012, he could have led PAN to victory.

Lech Kaczynski died 3 months before the Polish presidential election. Sympathy votes did not give his twin brother Jaroslaw the presidency that year, but Lech could have had the advantage of incumbency and a popularity distinct from his brother.

Zia ul-Haq, if the C-130 does not crash, where does that lead Pakistan? I could see him living until the 2000s.

Although it was a helicopter; Alexander Lebed. But if one wants him to be President it requires an earlier POD

Jerry Litton is a possible candidate for 1984 or 1988

Mickey Leland, although he could have stayed in the House.

Tancredo Neves. Elected President of Brazil but died before he could take office. (although not an airplane death)
 
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Hugh Gaitskell died in 1963, just before Labour came on to a narrow victory in the 1964 general election. If Gaitskell becomes prime minister instead of Wilson, the impact on the history of the UK is hard to overstate.

As a pretty easy example, Gaitskell was very eurosceptic and, being from the right of the Labour Party, could have cemented that as the accepted Labour position on Europe, at least while he remains Leader. He may well have won the 1970 general election, which means that the UK either never joins the EU or joins even later.

I tend to think that it means the UK never joins. If Gaitskell wins in 1970, then Heath will get the proverbial visit with the proverbial whisky and pistol. Enoch Powell was still in Parliament as a Tory in 1970, at the height of his public popularity, and the rules for the Tory leadership had changed in 1965 (following the controversial appointment of Alec Douglas-Home in 1963), giving Powell a potential backbencher constituency for a leadership bid.

It's possible that Powell becomes a strong contender for Tory leader. Regardless of if he wins or not, euroscepticism probably thereby becomes entrenched in the Conservative Party, and both parties come to a sort of understanding that the issue is too polarising within the parties to be pursued "at the present juncture" - ergo the UK never joins.
 
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Been getting into Kaiserreich lately and it’s made me wonder about what if the real Floyd Olson didn’t have stomach cancer. IRL he died on the campaign trail for the Senate in 1936. Wonder how well he’d do as Senator if he lived.
 
Some Weimar politicians:
Walther Rathenau, perhaps best known for his diplomatic successes which provided Germany room to maneuver after WWI. Some of them in the medium term proved popular even on the far right. Still a target for antisemitic and nationalistic hate he was murdered by Organisation Consul, a far right terror organisation of Freikorps origin. His death threw German foreign politics into a bit of a chaos until Stresemann took over. I doubt he could have prevented the Ruhr occupation, but maybe the entire conflict could have been resolved better with him around. He was internationally well connected and experienced, thus could at least have avoided some of the blunders Stresemann made while he learned to be a foreign minister. As an industrialist, part of the early wartime economic planning and post war rebuilding efforts he also had some interesting ideas about economic policy. On the other hand his death prompted some laws that strengthened the republics position against far-right extremism and their lack too could be ... interesting.

Matthias Erzberger is the other prominent victim of the OC. As minister of finances he basically developed the modern German tax system within one year. He also was a huge target for the right for his attempts to stabilize public finances and for signing the armistice and had stepped down in 1920, nine month before his murder. But with inflation starting to really take off it is well possible that he would have been called back to force through more unpopular, but effective reforms had he survived.

Hugo Stinnes was more successful as industrialist than as politician, but his influence can not be overstated. Time magazine called him the new emperor of Germany, a local saying at the Ruhr equals him to god even today ("Das walte Hugo"). After WW1 he negotiated with the unions the Stinnes-Legien agreement, which legitimated the unions and gave the industrialists some stability at least in relation to their workers. He also was a key figure of the MICUM negotiations which ultimately led to an end of the Ruhr occupation. Personally he managed to greatly expand his business empire in the aftermath of the war despite losing signifcant parts of his pre-war empire and held shares of more than 4500 firms at his death. His death could have been avoided, had his physician simply followed Stinnes requests. Politically he is a man of contradictions, being accused of socialism and exploiting the workers at the same time, condemning the Kapp putsch while providing Kapp with a comfortable exile and financing some of the right wing idiots, being largely pacifist while favouring east expansion, naming ships after both union boss Legien and nutjob general Luddendorff and so on. Much of the contradictions can be explained by his total focus on economic policy and his personal business interests to the exclusion of anything else. After his untimely death his heirs were unable to keep the empire together. Some of those ending in control were early financers of the extreme right with whom Stinnes had clashed over economic policy. Stinnes was not above pacting with the far right (one of his major investments actually was the Hugenberg media company), but just on economic policies he would not have pacted with the nazis from the beginning. His continued control over a significant part of the German industry, his international business cooperations and his sheer ability would also have a noticable effect on the great depression in Germany.

And finally Carl Legien, the leader of the unions for the Stinnes-Legien agreement mentioned above. He is also credited with organising the general strikes that brought down Kapp. He was offered the job of chancellor in 1920, but declined and died rather suddenly the same year aged 59. He also was an early supporter of the republic, positioning himself against a German soviet republic. Widely respected among workers, politicians and industrialists alike, at the time of his death he was the leader of the largest, arguably most powerful union organisation of the world. His replacement could not prevent a softening of some accomplishments in the wake of hyperinflation, in the late 20s had to accept a communist split (to be fair one mandated in Moscow) of the unions and acted very cautious in the 30s, going as far as publically distancing the ADGB from the SPD in a lukewarm attempt to reach an accomodation with the NSDAP.
 
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LBJ only died when he was 64, surprising young for a person who looked so old, if he gave up the cigs he probably would've lived much longer. Nixon and LBJ apparently were great friends, so I wonder how he would react to the Watergate scandal.

To my understanding, LBJ died when he did because he sank into depression after Vietnam forced him from office and he spent the last four years of his life drinking and smoking like there was no tomorrow. If in 1965 LBJ decides not to directly intervene in Vietnam, Saigon falls but he remains popular enough to win again in 1968 and he maybe lives another 5-10 years.
 
Getúlio Vargas in Brazil, he suffered a coup and comitted suicide at the last moment to abort it.

This actually helped him a lot, since the trauma of losing the president caused such a wave of popular unrest that neutralized the brazilian right for the years to come. Assuming he finishes the government, he would be another random president from the 1950s, with the difference that he had ruled before as a president and a dictator on the 30s and 40s, and dies somewhere on the mid-late 60s or early 70s.
I want to add Roberto Silveira to that list. Silveira served as governor of Rio de Janeiro from 1959 to 1961 and became enormously popular during his administration. Unfortunately, he died in a helicopter crash at the age of 37. Had he survived, he would've probably helped Leonel Brizola in the crisis created by Jânio Quadros' resignation, and he could've been a strong presidential candidate in 1965 (assuming there's no coup, of course).

Another politician whose survival could've had interesting consequences is Rodrigues Alves. He first served as president from 1902 to 1906 (during the Old Republic), and was elected to a second, non-consecutive term in 1918, but the Spanish Flu got him. If he survived and served until 1922, maybe butterflies could make the oligarchic regime collapse sooner than OTL.

Álvaro Obregón served as president of Mexico from 1920 to 1924, and won a second, non-consecutive term in 1928 but was murdered before his inauguration. Had he survived, could Mexico go through a "second Porfiriato"? The Maximato will definitely be butterflied away.

Ninoy Aquino could've been president of the Philippines had he not been assassinated in 1983.​
 
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I want to add Roberto Silveira to that list. Silveira served as governor of Rio de Janeiro from 1959 to 1961 and became enormously popular during his administration. Unfortunately, he died in a helicopter crash at the age of 37. Had he survived, he would've probably helped Leonel Brizola in the crisis created by Jânio Quadros' resignation.

Another politician whose survival could've had interesting consequences is Rodrigues Alves. He first served as president from 1902 to 1906 (during the Old Republic), and was elected to a second, non-consecutive term in 1918, but the Spanish Flu got him. If he survived and served until 1922, maybe butterflies could make the oligarchic regime collapse sooner than OTL.

Álvaro Obregón served as president of Mexico from 1920 to 1924, and won a second, non-consecutive term in 1928 but was murdered before his inauguration. Had he survived, could Mexico go through a "second Porfiriato"? The Maximato will definitely be butterflied away.

Ninoy Aquino could've been president of the Philippines had he not been assassinated in 1983.​
For Brazil there is also Juscelino Kubitschek, who died on a car crash. Imagine JK being elected in 1985, wow.
 
For Brazil there is also Juscelino Kubitschek, who died on a car crash. Imagine JK being elected in 1985, wow.
He'd be in his early eighties though (then again, Tancredo Neves was 74 when he was elected). Would've been pretty cool to see him campaign for the Diretas Já however, same thing with João Goulart (whose death was pretty damn sketchy).
 
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Paul Doumer, President of France from June 13th, 1931 until his assassination on May 7th, 1932. Though I have to admit that I honestly am not familiar enough with Third Republic politics to predict what could have changed had he lived out his term.
 
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ioannis Metaxis - prime minister of greece, died of toxaemia after an inflammation of the pharynx, on 29th January 1941.
He was in favour of getting as much support as possible from the Allies against Italy, but not of Allied soldiers in Greece.
If he lives either a few weeks less, or a few weeks more, WW2 changes, possibly radically.
 
George I of Greece was king of the Hellenes from 1863 until his murder in 1913. Had he lived until 1914 or so (wikipedia says he intended to abdicate in October 1913, though), Greece could've gotten involved in WWI on the Entente side from the get go, with huge consequences for Serbia, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire. The might even get Cyprus from the British as a reward for their contribution.
 
Foreign minister Anna Lindh, had she not been assassinated in the autumn of 2003 it is with certainty she would have been Prime Minister of Sweden at some point, Göran Persson probably resigns in 2004/2005 to make way for her
 
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The big WI for New Zealand is Norm Kirk, who died in office in 1974. He'd won a landslide (by NZ terms) in 72 but his successor lost to the opposition's Rob Muldoon in 75, who also won a landslide.
Whilst Kirk could have lost to Muldoon as well, it is usually assumed he would not have. So had he lived and led Labour to 1 victory in 1975, that would either delay or stop Muldoon's ascent to prime minister. Which would be pretty huge, as Muldoon's impact on modern New Zealand is really rather hard to downplay.
I think Muldoon wins 1978 though (I see 1975 under Kirk as similar to OTL 2005 - the incumbent holds on, but is never the same again).

IMHO, the big WI for New Zealand is actually Richard Seddon. The guy was only sixty when he died. Give him another fifteen years... we're talking a near-thirty year tenure as Prime Minister. That might well be enough to turn New Zealand into an essentially Canadian political system, whereby the Liberals are the dominant party, and the social democratic party (OTL Labour) is marginalised.
 
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