Photos of the Kaiserreich

128 million is a *bit* much 40 million is pushing it
40 million is actually close to OTL (~38.3 million) if you add Australia, NZ, PNG and West Papua. 128 million is way too much though.

edit: Add 2.8 million for OTL Maluku and 3 million for Papua province and you’re well over 40 million
 
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Taking into account the latest update to Kaiserreich, I ret-conned by post on Natpop Canada.

Here's my ideas on what the National Populists of Canada would be like. If a Natpop Canada submod were to exist, I could see Fuller having his own Natpop path in the National Focus Tree, while Blackmore could be the Natpop leader of Canada if Canada were to be puppeted by another power, like Pelley's Commonwealth of America.

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Admiral Sir Barry Edward Domvile (September 5, 1878-November 16, 1970), a British and Canadian Royal Navy Officer who was founder and leader of the United Empire League (UEL), the largest far-rightist and national populist political party in the Commonwealth of Canada. Domville served in the Royal Navy from 1892 to 1925, after which he fled to Canada during the British Revolution. He then served in the Canadian Royal Navy from 1925 until 1929. As a result of the British Revolution and his exile in Canada, Domville gained an intense hatred of Sydnicalism, Socialism, Communism and Bolshevism, and he also became an ardent anti-semite. In 1930, Domville and other like-minded British exiles founded the United Empire League in Toronto. The party was largely modeled on the Associazione Nazionalista Italiana founded by Italian writer Gabriele D'Annunzio in the Republic of Italy and called for "a unified Canadian nation under corpratist and nationalist rule" in an effort to "finally defeat Socialism and reclaim the British Isles for God, King and Country." The party advocated for the replacement of Parliament with a Grand Imperial Council and the office of Prime Minister with the totalitarian office of "Lord Protector", a style of corporatism in the vein of D'Annuzio's ideals, a strong military, the establishment of local militias and political youth organizations to militarily train Canadian citizens, a strong sense of Canadian and British nationalism and Anglo-Saxon racialism. The party was openly hostile towards Jews and Jewish-Canadians, as many in the party believed that Syndicalism was part of a "Judeo-Socialist" Conspiracy, Asian Canadians, as they were blamed for many social problems, and Native Canadians, with the party supporting the program of residential schools, as well as the ideologies of Sydnicalism, Socialism, Communism and Bolshevism, as well as immigrants from Socialist countries. The party was mostly on the fringes of Canadian politics, with the party gaining no seats in Parliament and winning over only a small part of the Canadian electorate and the British exile community. In 1935, Domvile retired from his leadership of the UEL but still continued to remain active in the party. As a result, he was forbidden by the Canadian government to rejoin the Canadian Royal Navy. During the Second American Civil War, Domville and the UEL petitioned for the Canada to directly intervene in the Second American Civil War and invade the Combined Syndicates of America. While Canada occupied New England, Alaska, Puerto Rico and the Panama Canal Zone, Canada did not intervene directly in the war, with New England, Alaska and the Panama Canal Zone being handed back to the United States of America after the end of the war, and with Puerto Rico gaining independence. Domville served as a reporter during the Spanish Civil War, writing in support of the Carlist Kingdom of Spain. Between 1937 and 1939, Domville made visits to numerous National Populist nations such as Russia, Japan and Argentina. During the Second Weltkrieg, he enthusiastically supported the war effort, this in spite of his open support for national populist regimes such as Savinkov's National Republican Russia, Iron Guard Romania, the Empire of Japan, Nationalist Argentina and Synarchist Mexico, among others. During the war, he also enthusiastically supported the Intregalist governments of Portugal and Brazil which were allied to Canada. After the Russian and Japanese declarations of war on Germany, Domville openly supported peaceful settlements between Germany and Russia and Germany and Japan, as he did not want to see the Entente involved in wars with Russia and Japan. After the war, Domvile returned to Great Britain and moved to London, where he re-established the United Empire League in London in 1948. Nevertheless, the party was still on the fringes of the politics of the British Reconstruction Authority and played no role in the De-Syndicalization of Britain. Domvile retired from the party in 1950 and lived the rest of his life in obscuirty, although he continued attend the meetings of numerous Far-Rightist British parties until his death. He also wrote and published a book entitled "The Case for National Populism" in 1953. He died in London on November 16, 1970 at the age of 92.

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John Frederick Charles "Boney" Fuller, also known as J.F.C. Fuller (September 1, 1878-November 13, 1963), a British and Canadian Army officer, military historian, and armored warfare strategist who was also a supporter of the United Empire League (UEL). Fuller served in the British Army from 1899 until 1925, during both the Second Boer War and the First Weltkrieg, after which he fled to Canada during the British Revolution and then became an Officer in the Royal Canadian Army. While in Canada, Fuller wrote and publish numerous books on military strategy, the most famous of which was The Foundations of the Science of War, published in 1927. As a result of the British Revolution and his exile in Canada, Fuller gained an intense hatred of Far-Leftist politics, and he also became impatient with what he considered the inability of the democratic government of Canada to adopt military reforms. As a result, Fuller began to secretly support the UEL, and even attended many party meetings, although he could not join the party outright do to his being a high-ranking member of the Royal Canadian Army. During the Second Weltkrieg, he enthusiastically supported the war effort and helped the Canadian General Staff develop new armored warfare strategies, this in spite of his sympathies towards the UEL which became something of an open secret amongst the Canadian Military High Command, the Canadian government and the British government-in-exile. After the Russian and Japanese declarations of war on Germany, Fuller, like Admiral Domville, supported, albeit secretly, peaceful settlements between Germany and Russia and Germany and Japan, as he did not want to see the Entente involved in wars with Russia and Japan. After the war, Fuller returned to England and continued to write books about military strategy and military history, among other subjects. Fuller retained his political convictions until the end of his life, and during the 1950s and 1960s, he supported numerous far-rightist and national populist groups in the United Kingdom. He also wrote in support of the Russian State and the United Kingdom, British Commonwealth, United States of America and the rest of the Entente developing closer relations with the Russian State in an effort to combat the German Empire and the Reichspakt, as well as the national populist regimes of Latin America. He also wrote that the Entente should aggressively undermine and even invade the remaining socialist regimes in Asia and Latin America. He died of natural causes in his home in Falmouth, Cornwall on November 13, 1963 at the age of 85.

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Henry Herbert Stevens (December 8, 1878-July 15, 1973), the English-born Canadian politician and businessman who became leader of the United Empire League after the resignation of Barry Domvile in 1935. Born in Bristol, England, Stevens immigrated with his family to Canada at the age of nine. He was elected to the House of Commons in 1911 as a Conservative and held numerous cabinet positions during the 1920s and 1930s. In 1931, Stevens, after years of frustration with Canadian politics and having developed a strong hatred for the "Red Menace in Britain", as well as anti-semetic and anti-immigrant sentiments, officially joined the United Empire League and rapidly rose up in the party and became close with the ex-admiral Barry Domvile. After Domvile resigned as leader in 1935, he personally chose Stevens to be his successor. Stevens led the party during both the Second American Civil War and the Second Weltkrieg. During the Second Weltkrieg, Stevens openly supported an Alliance between the Entente and the Russian State and for Canada to go to war with Germany and the Reichspakt after the fall of the Third Internationale, a position which the Canadian government never took seriously. After the war, with the British monarchy restored in Britain, the UEL had no real reason to exist in Canada anymore, and thus the party was disbanded in 1948. Stevens spent the rest of his life living in obscurity and never took part in politics ever again. He died in Vancouver, British Columbia on July 14, 1975 at the age of 94.

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Archibald Maule Ramsay (May 4, 1894-September 29, 1953), a Scottish and British Army Officer during the First Weltkrieg who became a British exile in Canada after the British Revolution of 1925. In 1926, he became a member of the British government-in-exile. In 1930, he joined the United Empire League and afterwards became notorious amongst the British exile community in Canada for his virulently anti-semetic views. After the restoration o the British monarchy in 1947, Ramsay helped to re-establish the United Empire League in Britain with Barry Domvile in 1948. After Domvile resigned from the party in 1950, Ramsay became leader of the party until his death from a heart-attack in 1953. He was succeeded as leader by fellow former-exile Arthur Kenneth Chesterton, who led the UEL until his death in 1968, after which the party disbanded.


John Horne Blackmore (March 27, 1890-June 14, 1972), a Canadian school teacher, principal and politician who was a founder of the right-wing populist Social Credit Party of Canada and later a member of the United Empire League led by Barry Domvile. In 1932, Blackmore became one of the founders of the Social Credit Party of Canada, which he helped to found alongside Sir William Aberhart, the future Premier of Alberta from 1935 until his death in 1943 and William Duncan Herridge, who became the first leader of the party. Not long before Aberhart became Premier of Alberta, Blackmore openly broke with Aberhart over numerous disagreements, such as Blackmore's thinly veiled yet openly anti-semetic views and support for corpratism within the party. In 1935, Blackmore left the Social Credit Party of Canada and then joined the United Empire League. Blackmore then became a close friend and confidant of Domvile and a staunch supporter of the UEL, with Blackmore becoming one the most influential Canadian members of the party outside of the British exile community of Canada. Not long after the Second Weltkrieg ended, the UEL in Canada disbanded in 1948, with its goal of Canada taking over Britain having now been achieved, with Blackmore founding a new party, the Canadian National Republican Party (CNRP), a far-rightist and national populist party modeled on Savinkov's People's Republican Party of Russia (NRPR), the national populist ideology of National Republicanism and the Russian State as a whole. Meanwhile, most of the British members of the UEL either quit politics or joined the new UEL re-established in Britain, while most of the Canadian members of the UEL joined the CNRP. The party supported the end of the monarchy in Canada, as in Blackmore's mind, it no longer served any purpose with the restoration of the monarchy in Great Britain, the amalgamation of the Head of State and Head of Government into one office known as "Grand Director", corpratism, Christian and Protestant fundamentalism, nativism, anti-semetism, restriction on immigration into Canada from non-European countries and the withdrawal of Canada from the Entente, as Blackmore saw the Entente as little more than a "British, French and American pet-project", with Blackmore fearing that the USA would overtake the Entente and then overtake Canada itself. The party also openly supported the Russian State of Boris Savinkov and other national populist regimes across the world. After Blackmore's death in 1972, John Ross Taylor, a veteran of the Entente invasion of Britain, one of the earliest members of the party and a close protege of Blackmore, became the new leader of CNRP. Taylor led the party until his own death in 1994, after which the party disbanded.
 
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A picture of the Narmada River, also known as the River of Death, Central India. During the Great Anti-Colonial Crusade(as the war is known in Japan and India outside of the Delhi governate regions) Entente forces— mostly Australasians and Dehlians— dug in along the river in a desperate effort to stop the forces of the Princely Federation and their Japanese advisors from breaking through and advancing northwards towards the invaluable port of Ahmedabad. The Federation‘s troops, confident in their superior numbers and Japanese weapons, entered the war— already raging between Dehli and the Bharatiya Commune for several months— with a massive artillery barrage on New Year‘s Day, 1939. Crossing the border at the Tapi River, they surged onwards towards the Narmada....and were stopped dead in their tracks.

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Australasian troops had been frantically redeploying along the lightly defended Narmada— abandoning cities like Jubbalpur, where they’d won a major victory over the syndicalist Indian forces months earlier— and they met the oncoming Princely forces with a wall of lead. By July Princely troops were still trying to break through across the Narmada in force, having taking appalling casualties in the process. The local crocodiles and catfish feasted on the corpses of slaughtered Princely and, to a lesser extent, Japanese troops, becoming particularly aggressive— to this day attacks on humans in the area are far from uncommon.
 

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Do brands still exist in Syndicalist countries, or does everything have stupid names like "Toy Brand Building System for the Syndicalist Youth"

Would I still find Pepsi made in a industrial syndicate in a communal 7 11 or would it be some shit like the "24 hour convenience creche of the people"
 
Do brands still exist in Syndicalist countries, or does everything have stupid names like "Toy Brand Building System for the Syndicalist Youth"

Would I still find Pepsi made in a industrial syndicate in a communal 7 11 or would it be some shit like the "24 hour convenience creche of the people"
Brands still exist, at least in Combined Syndicates of America. I'll go check for Commune of France/Union of Britain.
Enfield still exists in the latter, so I could see holdovers of older brands still existing in both.
 
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HMAS White Bear, an Australasian destroyer, off the Portuguese island of Madeira, February 1942. The unusually named White Bear was one of the few Weltkrieg era(laid down in 1919) destroyers of the Australasian fleet to survive the war. White Bear gained fame due to its actions in the Bahamas campaign, as Australasian destroyers and submarines conducted a highly successful commerce raiding campaign, first out of Miami and then out of the island of Nassau, against syndicalist merchant shipping. White Bear’s commander, Captain Roy Evans, gained a degree of fame due to his habit of flying a personalized Jolly Roger along with the Australasian naval ensign; this would be immortalized in the 1963 film Pirates of the Caribbean, widely regarded as one of the best war films of the era.

Australasian destroyers and submarines would wage a devastatingly effective campaign of commerce raiding against syndicalist shipping; this would prompt the CSA’s Secretary General for the Gulf Coast Occupied Zone, Ernest B. Ryan, to declare that the Australasians were nothing more than “imperialist bandits” and that “these modern day pirates would receive the same quarter as their ancient predecessors”. Ryan had still been fuming due to a raid by Australasian destroyers, assisted by aircraft from HMAS Furious, on Syndicate efforts to get the Gulf oil platforms— throughly sabotaged by AUS forces as they’d retreated westwards—- a week earlier—- the raid had left the valuable platforms ablaze and outright collapsed in several cases, severely setting back Syndicate efforts to acquire the invaluable resources there. Although he’d been pulled aside by a frantic CS Navy liaison officer who‘d explained that the Australasians‘ efforts were, at a fundamental level, identical to those of the CSA’s British and French allies in the North Sea and Atlantic, the damage was already done; the Third Internationale, already suffering from a crisis at the propaganda
level due to a series of wildly publicized massacres of POWs, suffered another body blow on the stage of international opinion.
 
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Jaeger(released in North America as Predator) is a 1991 German film released by Steiner Brothers Entertainment, starring Danubian action hero Ernst Schwarzenegger. Set during the Germano-Japanese rapprochement, the film depicts a team of mercenaries being dispatched into the Sumatran jungle to hunt down a cell of PKI guerrillas which had slaughtered members of a Japanese medical aid convoy several weeks earlier. Due to Japan’s actions in Sumatra during the East Indian War, large scale movement of Japanese regular troops into Sumatra would set off a firestorm of criticism both at home and abroad— after a grueling fifteen year counter-insurgency effort, Japan simply could not afford to take any actions which would suggest they were returning to the East Indies.

A mercenary team lead by Major Hans Gruber(Schwarzenegger) is therefore hired by the German government to “take care of the problem) in order to gain concessions from Japan at the negotiating table. Imperial Japanese Army G-3 officer Captain Kenji Yamata(Shiro Watanabe) is brought along with the team in order to provide a Japanese presence on the mission; other members of the team include former Mittleafrikan Askari and scout Jonas( Samuel Johnston); demolitions expert Erich(Emmanuel Braun); sniper Paul(David Kaempfer); medic Antonio(Ricardo Ortiz); heavy weapons operator Tex(James Varwell); and radio operator Chen(Brandon Li).

The team is inserted into the Sumatran jungle by helicopter, with orders to return to the LZ in one week‘s time. They quickly begin to notice signs that something isn’t right; Jonas discovers mysterious tracks and markings on trees that he can’t identify, and the team stumbles across the mutilated corpse of a number of jungle animals, including a large tiger. Pressing on deeper into the jungle over the course of several days the team locates the PKI camp; the guerrillas are depicted looting the corpses of several Japanese medical personnel; when they threaten to execute the lone survivor, a woman named Dr. Suzuki(Jennifer Ishida), Gruber and his team launch their assault on the camp, wiping out most of the PKI insurgents and rescuing the doctor. Dr. Suzuki is incoherent, raving about “monsters”; the team assumes she is referring to the guerrillas.

The team begins to make its way back towards the extraction point; however, while standing guard overnight, Antonio is attacked and killed by an unseen assailant; he manages to get off a single burst as he dies, awakening the camp, but a search turns up nothing. The creature is revealed to see heat; it also perfectly mimics Antonio‘s final words(Madre de Dios). The next mroning the team stumbles upon a destroyed camp and the skinned corpses of a half a dozen men; a search reveals that they were members of an Imperial Japanese Army Special Forces team which had previously been sent into the jungle, and that Yamata had been lying to the mercenaries from the get go. A tense stand-off ensues, which is only broken when the near catatonic Suzuki speaks up and reveals that the medical convoy had been attacked by an unseen force which had stalked them through the trees; the PKI guerrillas had stumbled upon the wreckage and had taken her, as the only survivor, prisoner. She also reveals that due to the guerrilla activity in the region, all of her fellow medical personnel had been armed; she had been the only one to refuse to carry a weapon.

The confrontation is interrupted by the same unseen assailant, which kills Erich with a blast from a plasma weapon; the remaining mercenaries and Yamata pour fire into the surrouding canopy, wounding the creature in the process, which leaves behind a bright green, glowing trail of blood. Jonas tells the others a tale about the “Simba”, a legendary tribe of “hunter spirits“ which would appear every hundred years to hunt lions in the Kenyan highlands, and who left behind a trail of bright green glowing blood. Realizing that whatever it is, the creature is unlikely to leave them alone unless they dispatch it, the mercenaries lay a trap for the beast; however, it successfully uses the trees to outflank the booby traps the team plants and kills Chen, destroying the team’s radio in the process. The creature lures Tex into a trap by mimicking Gruber’s voice and kills him with one of the team’s own booby traps, causing the mercenaries to realize that their best bet is to make for the extraction point.

As they make their way back towards the LZ the creature continues to stalk them; first Paul, then Yamata stay behind in order to delay the creature as long as possible and allow the others to gain more ground towards the extraction point. Finally, Gruber decides to make a stand at a river’s edge, sending Jonas to escort Dr. Suzuki the rest of the way back towards the extraction point. Covering himself with mud in an effort to camouflage himself Gruber soon realizes that the creature— which at this point finally appears in full view instead of as a shimmering outline or under the cover of active camouflage—-can’t see him. Gruber utilizes this to get the drop on the beast— a knockdown, drag out fight ensues and finally ends with Gruber successfully killing the hunter. Badly wounded in the process, Gruber stumbles into the river, where he is washed downstream to a local village and ultimately rescued by a search party lead by Dr. Suzuki and Jonas. The movie ends with a shot of a ship containing several more of the hunters entering orbit around earth, indicating that these creatures will continue to plague humanity.

Jaeger saw great box office success both in Germany and internationally; the English language dub, known as Predator, would become ome of the mostly widely viewed German films in North America ever. Jaeger would spawn four direct sequels and a whole host of other similar films and novels over the course of the next twenty years and even today is still one of the most widely known pop culture success stories to emerge from German cinema.
 
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Jaeger 2(released in North America as Predator 2) is a 1995 German-American film and sequel to the wildly acclaimed Jaeger. The film is the result of a partnership between the Steiner Brothers and Westmont Pictures, the American Federation‘s premier filmmaking institute. Martin McKee, a mid level executive at Westmont, was the driving force behind the partnership; back in 1991 following the release of the original film he’d met Johann Steiner’s nephew Kurt at a party being held in Ottawa to celebrate Jaeger breaking the record for German films in North America on opening weekend. Kurt had recently been discharged from the Fallschirmjaeger-Division of the German Army while McKee had served in the 101st “Screaming Eagles” Airborne Division during his national service tour; the two young men had therefore hit it off immediately. McKee was a huge fan of Jaeger, and he and Kurt spent much of the night bouncing ideas for a sequel off of each other. Westmont Pictures at the time had— and still has— one of the largest collections of demilitarized surplus military equipment in the world, and Kurt soon promised to get McKee in touch with his uncles. McKee pitched the idea of a sequel set in North America in order to cash in on the huge market the first film had generated; Johann and Franz Steiner were interested but had just committed to film Ragnarok, a war film chronicling the last days of the Mosley regime in the Union of Britain, and thus the project was put onto the back burner until the spring of 1995.

Set during the “Scarlet Summer” of 1985 in the city of Chicago, Jaeger 2 stars Darryl Graham as Detective Joseph Warren, a veteran and highly decorated detective desperately trying to stem the tide of violence in the city. Forty years after the Combined Syndicates of America had been crushed, remnant syndicalist terrorists had begun a new campaign of bombings and assassinations through Chicago and much of the Midwest. The summer of 1985 saw the worst of the carnage, with seemingly a new bombing every day. The film begins with a police raid on an apartment building thought to contain bomb making materials; the officers are met by a barrage of heavy gunfire as members of the New People’s Army insurgent group open fire; several police officers are killed and one is badly wounded and left out in the open, with a sniper firing from the top floor of the apartment building and pinning the police down as the insurgents retreat into their lair. An unseen figure watches as Detective Warren braves the sniper fire to successfully pull the wounded officer to safety; it then leaps from roof to roof in order to approach the target building. It pauses on top of a building next door to where Warren has taken cover with the wounded officer; he spots the strange glimmer from the hunter‘s active camouflage, but dismisses it as a trick of the light.

Suddenly, the sniper is hurled through a window and comes crashing down, minus his head, on top of a police cruiser; Warren organizes a second team consisting of himself and Detectives Sergio Gonzalez(Adam Martinez) Emily Brandt(Grace Bell) and Sean McCarthy(Owen Engels) to attempt a second push into the building as the sounds of intense gunfire and screams begin to emanate from the building; storming the apartment complex they find the New People’s Army insurgents slaughtered. A single survivor, missing an arm, hurls himself out a window in a blind panic after shrieking about a “demon from hell” attacking them as they‘d retreated through the building. The raid team discovers odd markings carved into one of the doors leading towards the roof, however, before they can investigate further, the rest of the CPD storms the building; Captain O’Rourke(Jim Tanner), the unit’s commanding officer, chews Warren out for taking an ”unnecessary risk“ by storming the building with only three other officers; he also announces that a group of agents from Washington DC are arriving to take over the crime scene and that therefore it is now off limits to local personnel. The order, unsurprisingly, doesn’t go over well with Warren or his team.

That night, the Hunter attacks a group of drug runners conducting a business deal in a warehouse; the gangsters prove to be no match for the Hunter and are slaughtered. Warren and his team arrive on the scene only to find their access blocked by a group of federal agents led by Agent Szymanski(Casmir Kowalski). The agents are seen dressed in biohazard suits and wielding radiation detectors; they are clearly searching for something. The refusal to allow the detectives onto the scene angers Warren— he gets into a scuffle with the arrogant Szymanski and gets sent back to station headquarters to calm down by Captain O’Rourke. Gonzalez, who hadn’t been with the main group, slips away and returns hours later, after the federal agents have left, to continue searching for clues. He discovers a bizarre spearpoint style object buried in part of the wall fifteen feet off the ground as well as additional markings carved into the rafters; however, the Hunter returns to the warehouse and begins to stalk him. After a several minute long cat and mouse sequence, the creature strikes, killing Gonzalez with its wristblades.

O’Rourke breaks the bad news the next morning to an angry Warren, introducing him to rookie Detective David Larson(Greg Mitchell) who was scheduled to be assigned to Warren’s special unit that day; Warren sees it as an attempt to replace Gonzalez and reacts poorly at first, while McCarthy and Brandt reassure Larson that it is nothing personal. Warren receives a lead from forsenics that Gonzalez’s killer had been in a warehouse at the dockyards; he heads down to the site along with Larson, with Warren asking Brandt and McCarthy to meet them there. The Hunter intervenes when a trio of men try to rob passengers on a L train car; several of the passengers pulls their own guns, and in the confusion everyone in the car is killed, either by the Hunter or by stray gunfire. A lucky shot from one of the dying robbers damages the Hunter’s active camouflage unit, causing the creature to remain at least mostly visible for the rest of the film.

Down at the dockyards Warren and Larson discover numerous federal agents setting a trap for the Hunter; Szymanski angrily orders Warren and Larson disarmed and taken prisoner. Meanwhile, McCarthy and Brandt, en route to the docks, are ambushed by a New People’s Army hit squad; McCarthy is hit multiple times while covering Brandt. Just as Brandt runs out of ammunition and it looks like they will be overrun, the Hunter intercedes, slaughtering the surviving New People‘s Army hitmen and sparing Brandt and the badly wounded McCarthy. It then disappears as Captain O’Rourke and numerous police and medical personnel arrive; Brandt informs them about Warren‘s planned trip to the docks and leads them there.

Down at the docks, the Hunter uses its wristblades to damage the warehouse’s heating/cooling system, causing a dense mist to fill the building; the creature uses this for cover and slaughters the federal agents, including Szymanski. Warren and Larson manage to break free and, using assault rifles taken from dead agents, pursue the creature; they manage to wound it several times as they chase it into the network of scaffolding that makes up the building‘s upper levels. The Hunter manages to turn the tables, however, ambushing and beheading Larson as the two officers he split up. It then uses Larson’s voice to try and lure Warren into a trap; however, he manages to avoid the Hunter’s attack and engages it in brutal hand to hand combat. Ultimately Warren manages to knock the creature off the scaffolding ledge to the ground below, where it is impaled on a piece of pipe which had been damaged in its earlier fight with the federal agents; the creature eerily mimics human laughter as it dies. Warren notices a piece of gear on the Hunter’s body begin to glow, and numbers start flashing across it, almost like a countdown; he flees from the warehouse just in time as a massive explosion consumes the entire building, reducing everything inside to ash, just as the police and medical reinforcements arrive outside. Captain O’Rourke asks what happened there but Warren is unable to answer; helped by Brandt, he limps over to a medical vehicle to be treated for his injuries.

In an epilogue scene, Warren is drinking at a bar when Major Hans Gruber(Ernst Schwarzenegger) walks into the place and buys him another round of drinks; the conversation turns to the events of the past few days, and Gruber reveals that several years earlier he’d had a similar encounter in Sumatra. He tells Warren he knows he’s been suspended from the police force for violating orders and not being able to give Captain O’Rourke a clear answer on what happened at the dockyards, and offers him a job as part of a brand new organization dedicated to hunting down the Hunters. Gruber leaves a business card emblazoned with a stylized spear on the table as he leaves, and the movie ends with Warren picking it up and contemplating it.

Jaeger 2 wouldn’t quite match the success of the original, but it would become a popular movie in its own right, and it made a great deal of money at the box office for Westmont and the Steiner Brothers. The film is well liked amongst the fan community for largely establishing much of the lore surrounding the Hunters, as well as introducing interesting new plot elements. Ernst Schwarzenegger had been unable to appear in anything other than a cameo role due to scheduling conflicts, but many fans felt Darryl Graham more than pulled his own weight as the movie‘s lead. The film proved that the Jaeger franchise had lasting public interest and was not a “one hit wonder“.
 
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Jaeger(released in North America as Predator) is a 1991 German film released by Steiner Brothers Entertainment, starring Danubian action hero Ernst Schwarzenegger. Set during the Germano-Japanese rapprochement, the film depicts a team of mercenaries being dispatched into the Sumatran jungle to hunt down a cell of PKI guerrillas which had slaughtered members of a Japanese medical aid convoy several weeks earlier. Due to Japan’s actions in Sumatra during the East Indian War, large scale movement of Japanese regular troops into Sumatra would set off a firestorm of criticism both at home and abroad— after a grueling fifteen year counter-insurgency effort, Japan simply could not afford to take any actions which would suggest they were returning to the East Indies.

A mercenary team lead by Major Hans Gruber(Schwarzenegger) is therefore hired by the German government to “take care of the problem) in order to gain concessions from Japan at the negotiating table. Imperial Japanese Army G-3 officer Captain Kenji Yamata(Shiro Watanabe) is brought along with the team in order to provide a Japanese presence on the mission; other members of the team include former Mittleafrikan Askari and scout Jonas( Samuel Johnston); demolitions expert Erich(Emmanuel Braun); sniper Paul(David Kaempfer); medic Antonio(Ricardo Ortiz); heavy weapons operator Tex(James Varwell); and radio operator Chen(Brandon Li).

The team is inserted into the Sumatran jungle by helicopter, with orders to return to the LZ in one week‘s time. They quickly begin to notice signs that something isn’t right; Jonas discovers mysterious tracks and markings on trees that he can’t identify, and the team stumbles across the mutilated corpse of a number of jungle animals, including a large tiger. Pressing on deeper into the jungle over the course of several days the team locates the PKI camp; the guerrillas are depicted looting the corpses of several Japanese medical personnel; when they threaten to execute the lone survivor, a woman named Dr. Suzuki(Jennifer Ishida), Gruber and his team launch their assault on the camp, wiping out most of the PKI insurgents and rescuing the doctor. Dr. Suzuki is incoherent, raving about “monsters”; the team assumes she is referring to the guerrillas.

The team begins to make its way back towards the extraction point; however, while standing guard overnight, Antonio is attacked and killed by an unseen assailant; he manages to get off a single burst as he dies, awakening the camp, but a search turns up nothing. The creature is revealed to see heat; it also perfectly mimics Antonio‘s final words(Madre de Dios). The next mroning the team stumbles upon a destroyed camp and the skinned corpses of a half a dozen men; a search reveals that they were members of an Imperial Japanese Army Special Forces team which had previously been sent into the jungle, and that Yamata had been lying to the mercenaries from the get go. A tense stand-off ensues, which is only broken when the near catatonic Suzuki speaks up and reveals that the medical convoy had been attacked by an unseen force which had stalked them through the trees; the PKI guerrillas had stumbled upon the wreckage and had taken her, as the only survivor, prisoner. She also reveals that due to the guerrilla activity in the region, all of her fellow medical personnel had been armed; she had been the only one to refuse to carry a weapon.

The confrontation is interrupted by the same unseen assailant, which kills Erich with a blast from a plasma weapon; the remaining mercenaries and Yamata pour fire into the surrouding canopy, wounding the creature in the process, which leaves behind a bright green, glowing trail of blood. Jonas tells the others a tale about the “Simba”, a legendary tribe of “hunter spirits“ which would appear every hundred years to hunt lions in the Kenyan highlands, and who left behind a trail of bright green glowing blood. Realizing that whatever it is, the creature is unlikely to leave them alone unless they dispatch it, the mercenaries lay a trap for the beast; however, it successfully uses the trees to outflank the booby traps the team plants and kills Chen, destroying the team’s radio in the process. The creature lures Tex into a trap by mimicking Gruber’s voice and kills him with one of the team’s own booby traps, causing the mercenaries to realize that their best bet is to make for the extraction point.

As they make their way back towards the LZ the creature continues to stalk them; first Paul, then Yamata stay behind in order to delay the creature as long as possible and allow the others to gain more ground towards the extraction point. Finally, Gruber decides to make a stand at a river’s edge, sending Jonas to escort Dr. Suzuki the rest of the way back towards the extraction point. Covering himself with mud in an effort to camouflage himself Gruber soon realizes that the creature— which at this point finally appears in full view instead of as a shimmering outline or under the cover of active camouflage—-can’t see him. Gruber utilizes this to get the drop on the beast— a knockdown, drag out fight ensues and finally ends with Gruber successfully killing the hunter. Badly wounded in the process, Gruber stumbles into the river, where he is washed downstream to a local village and ultimately rescued by a search party lead by Dr. Suzuki and Jonas. The movie ends with a shot of a ship containing several more of the hunters entering orbit around earth, indicating that these creatures will continue to plague humanity.

Jaeger saw great box office success both in Germany and internationally; the English language dub, known as Predator, would become ome of the mostly widely viewed German films in North America ever. Jaeger would spawn four direct sequels and a whole host of other similar films and novels over the course of the next twenty years and even today is still one of the most widely known pop culture success stories to emerge from German cinema.
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Jaeger 2(released in North America as Predator 2) is a 1995 German-American film and sequel to the wildly acclaimed Jaeger. The film is the result of a partnership between the Steiner Brothers and Westmont Pictures, the American Federation‘s premier filmmaking institute. Martin McKee, a mid level executive at Westmont, was the driving force behind the partnership; back in 1991 following the release of the original film he’d met Johann Steiner’s nephew Kurt at a party being held in Ottawa to celebrate Jaeger breaking the record for German films in North America on opening weekend. Kurt had recently been discharged from the Fallschirmjaeger-Division of the German Army while McKee had served in the 101st “Screaming Eagles” Airborne Division during his national service tour; the two young men had therefore hit it off immediately. McKee was a huge fan of Jaeger, and he and Kurt spent much of the night bouncing ideas for a sequel off of each other. Westmont Pictures at the time had— and still has— one of the largest collections of demilitarized surplus military equipment in the world, and Kurt soon promised to get McKee in touch with his uncles. McKee pitched the idea of a sequel set in North America in order to cash in on the huge market the first film had generated; Johann and Franz Steiner were interested but had just committed to film Ragnarok, a war film chronicling the last days of the Mosley regime in the Union of Britain, and thus the project was put onto the back burner until the spring of 1995.

Set during the “Scarlet Summer” of 1985 in the city of Chicago, Jaeger 2 stars Darryl Graham as Detective Joseph Warren, a veteran and highly decorated detective desperately trying to stem the tide of violence in the city. Forty years after the Combined Syndicates of America had been crushed, remnant syndicalist terrorists had begun a new campaign of bombings and assassinations through Chicago and much of the Midwest. The summer of 1985 saw the worst of the carnage, with seemingly a new bombing every day. The film begins with a police raid on an apartment building thought to contain bomb making materials; the officers are met by a barrage of heavy gunfire as members of the New People’s Army insurgent group open fire; several police officers are killed and one is badly wounded and left out in the open, with a sniper firing from the top floor of the apartment building and pinning the police down as the insurgents retreat into their lair. An unseen figure watches as Detective Warren braves the sniper fire to successfully pull the wounded officer to safety; it then leaps from roof to roof in order to approach the target building. It pauses on top of a building next door to where Warren has taken cover with the wounded officer; he spots the strange glimmer from the hunter‘s active camouflage, but dismisses it as a trick of the light.

Suddenly, the sniper is hurled through a window and comes crashing down, minus his head, on top of a police cruiser; Warren organizes a second team consisting of himself and Detectives Sergio Gonzalez(Adam Martinez) Emily Brandt(Grace Bell) and Sean McCarthy(Owen Engels) to attempt a second push into the building as the sounds of intense gunfire and screams begin to emanate from the building; storming the apartment complex they find the New People’s Army insurgents slaughtered. A single survivor, missing an arm, hurls himself out a window in a blind panic after shrieking about a “demon from hell” attacking them as they‘d retreated through the building. The raid team discovers odd markings carved into one of the doors leading towards the roof, however, before they can investigate further, the rest of the CPD storms the building; Captain O’Rourke(Jim Tanner), the unit’s commanding officer, chews Warren out for taking an ”unnecessary risk“ by storming the building with only three other officers; he also announces that a group of agents from Washington DC are arriving to take over the crime scene and that therefore it is now off limits to local personnel. The order, unsurprisingly, doesn’t go over well with Warren or his team.

That night, the Hunter attacks a group of drug runners conducting a business deal in a warehouse; the gangsters prove to be no match for the Hunter and are slaughtered. Warren and his team arrive on the scene only to find their access blocked by a group of federal agents led by Agent Szymanski(Casmir Kowalski). The agents are seen dressed in biohazard suits and wielding radiation detectors; they are clearly searching for something. The refusal to allow the detectives onto the scene angers Warren— he gets into a scuffle with the arrogant Szymanski and gets sent back to station headquarters to calm down by Captain O’Rourke. Gonzalez, who hadn’t been with the main group, slips away and returns hours later, after the federal agents have left, to continue searching for clues. He discovers a bizarre spearpoint style object buried in part of the wall fifteen feet off the ground as well as additional markings carved into the rafters; however, the Hunter returns to the warehouse and begins to stalk him. After a several minute long cat and mouse sequence, the creature strikes, killing Gonzalez with its wristblades.

O’Rourke breaks the bad news the next morning to an angry Warren, introducing him to rookie Detective David Larson(Greg Mitchell) who was scheduled to be assigned to Warren’s special unit that day; Warren sees it as an attempt to replace Gonzalez and reacts poorly at first, while McCarthy and Brandt reassure Larson that it is nothing personal. Warren receives a lead from forsenics that Gonzalez’s killer had been in a warehouse at the dockyards; he heads down to the site along with Larson, with Warren asking Brandt and McCarthy to meet them there. The Hunter intervenes when a trio of men try to rob passengers on a L train car; several of the passengers pulls their own guns, and in the confusion everyone in the car is killed, either by the Hunter or by stray gunfire. A lucky shot from one of the dying robbers damages the Hunter’s active camouflage unit, causing the creature to remain at least mostly visible for the rest of the film.

Down at the dockyards Warren and Larson discover numerous federal agents setting a trap for the Hunter; Szymanski angrily orders Warren and Larson disarmed and taken prisoner. Meanwhile, McCarthy and Brandt, en route to the docks, are ambushed by a New People’s Army hit squad; McCarthy is hit multiple times while covering Brandt. Just as Brandt runs out of ammunition and it looks like they will be overrun, the Hunter intercedes, slaughtering the surviving New People‘s Army hitmen and sparing Brandt and the badly wounded McCarthy. It then disappears as Captain O’Rourke and numerous police and medical personnel arrive; Brandt informs them about Warren‘s planned trip to the docks and leads them there.

Down at the docks, the Hunter uses its wristblades to damage the warehouse’s heating/cooling system, causing a dense mist to fill the building; the creature uses this for cover and slaughters the federal agents, including Szymanski. Warren and Larson manage to break free and, using assault rifles taken from dead agents, pursue the creature; they manage to wound it several times as they chase it into the network of scaffolding that makes up the building‘s upper levels. The Hunter manages to turn the tables, however, ambushing and beheading Larson as the two officers he split up. It then uses Larson’s voice to try and lure Warren into a trap; however, he manages to avoid the Hunter’s attack and engages it in brutal hand to hand combat. Ultimately Warren manages to knock the creature off the scaffolding ledge to the ground below, where it is impaled on a piece of pipe which had been damaged in its earlier fight with the federal agents; the creature eerily mimics human laughter as it dies. Warren notices a piece of gear on the Hunter’s body begin to glow, and numbers start flashing across it, almost like a countdown; he flees from the warehouse just in time as a massive explosion consumes the entire building, reducing everything inside to ash, just as the police and medical reinforcements arrive outside. Captain O’Rourke asks what happened there but Warren is unable to answer; helped by Brandt, he limps over to a medical vehicle to be treated for his injuries.

In an epilogue scene, Warren is drinking at a bar when Major Hans Gruber(Ernst Schwarzenegger) walks into the place and buys him another round of drinks; the conversation turns to the events of the past few days, and Gruber reveals that several years earlier he’d had a similar encounter in Sumatra. He tells Warren he knows he’s been suspended from the police force for violating orders and not being able to give Captain O’Rourke a clear answer on what happened at the dockyards, and offers him a job as part of a brand new organization dedicated to hunting down the Hunters. Gruber leaves a business card emblazoned with a stylized spear on the table as he leaves, and the movie ends with Warren picking it up and contemplating it.

Jaeger 2 wouldn’t quite match the success of the original, but it would become a popular movie in its own right, and it made a great deal of money at the box office for Westmont and the Steiner Brothers. The film is well liked amongst the fan community for largely establishing much of the lore surrounding the Hunters, as well as introducing interesting new plot elements. Ernst Schwarzenegger had been unable to appear in anything other than a cameo role due to scheduling conflicts, but many fans felt Darryl Graham more than pulled his own weight as the movie‘s lead. The film proved that the Jaeger franchise had lasting public interest and was not a “one hit wonder“.
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General Vo Nguyen Giap of the Indochinese People‘s Revolutionary Army poses for a picture, 1980. Giap got his start as a guerrilla by leading fellow students in ambushes of German supply convoys through the southern Annam region. His activities caught the attention of the People’s Liberation Command in Saigon, and they decided to give him a chance, entrusting him with command of a company sized unit of Cambodian troops, part of the Khmer Issarak movement. Giap‘s troops would grow exponentially as he lead the defense of the city of Stung Treng against the German colonizers, successfully holding off their offensive.

Giap would also mastermind the Tet Offensive, a daring uprising in the northern Tonkin region which seized Hanoi and lead to the encirclement and destruction of three German divisions. Many historians believe that the Tet Offensive is what saved the Indochinese Union; German commanders like the famous Erwin Rommel had the People’s Liberation Force hard pressed to hold its ground across much of Annam, and German troops had overrun the Mekong Delta, seizing Can Tho. To many observers, including those of the Internationale, it looked like Germany was winning. Tet threw that all off balance; Hanoi fell, German units were encircled and wiped out across Laos and central Annam, and the situation, frankly, fell apart. In the Delta General Rommel launched a last ditch offensive aimed at Saigon, but it ground to a halt in the city‘s suburbs, with the Saigon Workers, Teachers and Cadets Brigades playing a particularly vital role in holding the Germans off....and suffering casualties which reflected that. In the end, though, the sacrifices of the revolutionaries across Indochina were not in vain— on May 17, 1937 the Germans officially agreed to pull out of Indochina. The Internationale trumpeted the news of colonialism having suffered a “devastating blow” across the globe.

But that was not to say that the newborn Indochinese state was out of the woods. Across the Mekong, Siam glowers at the news of a revolutionary neighbor. Absolutists triumphed in the country’s brief, brutal civil war, which raged on at the same time as the Indochinese Revolution, and Japan hovers out of sight like a vulture eager to plunder the rubber and tungsten resources the new syndicalist state has. With dangerous neighbors Indochina’s struggles may be only just beginning. But for now, it is time to enjoy newfound freedom.

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.Soldiers of the elite division Su Doan 304 ‘Vinh Quang’ march through Saigon during the victory parade, July 20, 1937.
 
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Colombian military intervention in Argentina (1983). It was executed in the mission of taking Jorge Rafael Videla, the Argentinean dictator, with the help of the German Empire. It ended with the capture of Videla who was sent to Medellin with the charges of crimes against humanity, as Argentina returned to a stable democracy and freedom after more than 48 years of a constant right-wing totalitarian dictatorship initiated by Manuel Carlés. The actions by Colombia where heavily repudiated by the other Latin American nation who became hostile towards the Andean nation calling them the new 'Yankee Imperialists of the South,' even though Argentina recuperated quickly and became one of the fastest-growing economies of the whole world, even being in par with the one of the French from 1989-1993. Colombian troops returned to their nation who was beginning to pass through one of its most violent eras from 1984-1996.
 
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