Photos from World War Z

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A BVP-1 of Slovakian Armed Forces, they were used against zombies in Bratislava, Košice, and helped to clean parts of Austria, Hungary and Czechia, helping the bohemian fortresses.
 
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Macedonian Army Cobra 4x4 used by military police during the first stages of the Great Panic, they were deployed in Skopje to attack any "african rabies horde"
 

Jack Lew, Secretary of Treasury, announcing the freezing of Breckinridge Scott's assets following his escape from the United States, May 9, 2013.
 
Ruins of Nicosia Airport, restored after the war. It became a quarantine zone, but was heavily guarded by Cyprus National Guard
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A soldier outside a refugee camp set in the airport zone, after got cleaned and rebuild as a quarantine zone
 
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Blagaj Fortress (or Old Town of Blagaj), Bosnia and Herzegovina. It became the main safe zone in Mostar against zombies as it is well protected in a dangerous place for hordes, and had wells, weapons from the castle and military, near food sources, also that was being restored during the Great Panic.
 
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Muiderslot before WWZ. It fell in part because of an outbreak of pneumonia. Coupled with isolation, malnutrition, a lack of medication, and of course the ever-present threat of the zombies, and it was no wonder that the inhabitants were all dead before the end of the siege. After the war, it was cleansed and became a national monument fot the dead in the Great Panic
 
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Blagaj Fortress (or Old Town of Blagaj), Bosnia and Herzegovina. It became the main safe zone in Mostar against zombies as it is well protected in a dangerous place for hordes, and had wells, weapons from the castle and military, near food sources, also that was being restored during the Great Panic.
This was ideal to survive since it is located on a steep hill.

Irony how castles and forts are considered obsolete in modern warfare but against a human-wave enemy, it would hold out.
 
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A rare photo managed to be taken by an Indian journalist showed one of the wartime humanitarian crisises as the small road was packed with refugees streaming towards the temporary refuge in Gangtok, Sikkim during the national retreat towards the Himalayas. As the lowlands, especially the densely populated Ganges river valley and Bengal were overrun, the remaining Indian government were left with no choice but to move their safe zones up in the defensible Himalayan territories. This was done with the cooperation of the Nepalese and Bhutanese governments, who managed to hold their mostly mountainous territories, so as to seal and hold the perimeters against the influx of the infecteds that followed the fleeing refugees.

(From 2012 )
 
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A photo taken from a news chopper at the moment several C-17 Globemasters exploded at Warner-Robins Air Force Base.
The planes were intended to evacuate "select" individuals either to Hawaii or safe zones behind the Rocky Mountains.
Most scheduled flights had already departed, unfortunately for the remaining refugees, the barricades were breached by a horde of zombies and several desperate groups of people. Confusion and panic bred instant chaos as soldiers open fired on zeds, civilians, and each other. The planes, full with evacuees, tragically exploded when a fuel truck was destroyed by a wayward grenade.

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The "supposed" remains of Tokyo following a nuclear strike, posted by internet pariah Paul L. Jakes aka Skidouche following the evacuation of the Japanese Home Islands. Jakes had been uploading and streaming recordings of his time in Japan, dubbed "My Japanese Odyssey". The above image was part of his last video, in which he claimed to have filmed the atomic destruction of Japan's capital city, from a safe distance away of course. Even with the global crisis occurring, it would only take a day before his facade would be shattered. Former internet personality "tohosmaninAmerica" quickly pointed out that this was a scene from the latest Godzilla film and posted this enhancement (the original upload had been made grainy and damaged via photoshop). Others would follow up by asking how Jakes had managed to upload the video with Japan having no functioning internet and after the supposed electromagnetic pulse following a nuclear detonation? Soon after a press release from the Japanese government in exile and US Forces Pacific would officially rebuke Jakes and demonstrate that Tokyo still remained with footage taken from drones and an F/A-18E recon flight. Furthermore, an employee from Jakes' internet provider would leak that all uploads came from Pueblo, Colorado.

Jakes would become embroiled in further trouble when he uploaded authentic footage of unfortunate survivors being devoured by zombies to Youtube.

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Adele Franklin (left), Sam Alton (right), two "leftovers" outside of Rock Island, Illinois.

"Leftovers" became a term for people who had been unable to relocate to safety or had been denied transport on military, government, or nationalized transport. Screening had been severely strict for those whom were transported by air or land to Hawaii and/or the Rocky Mountain safe zones. Anyone with chronic illnesses or potential health issues would be denied passage; Sam was a type 2 diabetic with PTSD from the Iraq war while Adele had been diagnosed with a heart murmur.

The two friends and several other "leftovers" would fortify several buildings in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; including a courthouse and a Sam's Club , before journeying to the safe zone at the Rock Island Arsenal.
 
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This was ideal to survive since it is located on a steep hill.

Irony how castles and forts are considered obsolete in modern warfare but against a human-wave enemy, it would hold out.
Wikipedia says this of Blagaj Fortress:
Unlike other fortifications that were also rulers’ residences in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Blagaj fort is on a naturally flat site above vertical cliffs to the south, west and north. The ground plan of the fort is an irregular polygon adapted to the configuration of the terrain. The approach route, a steep serpentine bridle path 2 metres (7 ft) wide and 900 metres (3,000 ft) long, leads to the entrance in the thickest (east) wall of the forecourt. The walls of 12 or 14 metres (39 or 46 ft) in height have remained largely preserved, and range in thickness from 1.5 to 2.0 metres (4.9 to 6.6 ft), while on the south they are no thicker than 1.5 metres (4.9 ft). The inner defended space is a relatively small area of about 1,700 square metres (18,000 sq ft), similar to the Jajce fort.

The entrance to the fortified town was protected by an outer forecourt that is now hard to discern, a forecourt (VII, measuring 10 x 11.5 m) and a gatehouse (VII, measuring 10 x 7 m) as the final obstacle to attackers. The walls of the gatehouse are noticeably more solid and higher than those of the forecourt.

In the 6th century, most of the walls were increased in height although their dimensions remained the same. During the medieval period the entire mass was considerably increased by these additions, and it is not impossible that some of the lower parts of the tower collapsed. The breastworks may not have been built up fully to their original height, but somewhat lower (Basler, 1983, 32). In the late 14th and early 15th century, the walls were reinforced and thickened. About ten meters from the fort yet another wall was added giving that space the impression of a trench. The east wall was badly damaged in the 18th or early 19th century when a large quantity of gunpowder exploded in its middle tower. Repairs were carried out rather clumsily and considerably altered the original appearance (Basler, 1983). Anđelić, who carried out excavations in 1965, writes: “As a detailed result of the excavations, it turned out that the fort had no remains of antique or late antique architecture” (Anđelić, 1965, 179).

Among the architectural features discovered, the most significant were the remains of a palace (XV), of irregular rectangular outline.

A comparison of the walls' structure enables one to track the various stages of construction and repair - from the earliest beginnings of the fort in the fourth century. The walls of the first stage of construction are of quarry stone laid in horizontal layers (opus incertum), similar to the palace in Mogorjelo. In the second stage, which lasted between 535 and 600, the walls were repaired and in places built up to a height of 1 to 3 metres (3.3 to 9.8 ft), using the technique of stone laid slantwise (opus spicatum). This construction technique is associated with the reign of the Emperor Justinian (527–565). Repairs to the central tower of the east wall date to the 6th century. The type and extent of the interventions dating from the 7th to the 15th century are hard to determine because of later repairs, conducted in opus incertum up to the 19th century. After the 16th century, all works on the fort were carried out by local 'dunđeri' (all-round builders who would turn their hand equally to masonry or carpentry), which is ascribed to the abrupt decline in the strategic importance of the fort in the circumstances of the day.
 
Britain has lots of Castles, but so many are actual ruins that cannot be easily be made liveable even if easily refortified.

Having said that, a lot will depend on on time available before the Horde hit the Castles location and what starting state the place is in. Windsor will be a lot easier to fortify than say Dudley or Kenilworth.

I'd guess France and Spain with a similar history of Castles would be roughly the same. Eastern Europe seems to have a lot more intact fortifications- though those 'fairy tale' Castles in Germany are toast.
 
Britain has lots of Castles, but so many are actual ruins that cannot be easily be made liveable even if easily refortified.

Having said that, a lot will depend on on time available before the Horde hit the Castles location and what starting state the place is in. Windsor will be a lot easier to fortify than say Dudley or Kenilworth.

I'd guess France and Spain with a similar history of Castles would be roughly the same. Eastern Europe seems to have a lot more intact fortifications- though those 'fairy tale' Castles in Germany are toast.
I'd say Neuschwanstein Castle survives just fine, but....it's located in southwest Bavaria already
 
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