Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

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A crowd of young men from the Actionist French 'Camelots du Roi' in New Orleans listening to a speech from a Freedom Party official, 1939. There were multiple events bringing together the various youth groups of the Entente, with Houston hosting the 1938 International Vanguard Youth Conference. The IVYC in Houston brought together Freedom Youth Corps, Camelots, and the Young Knights of the British Silver Shirts. The event became a massive scandal when over seven hundred young women from the Confederate Girl Guides became pregnant due to lackluster chaperoning and the close proximity between where boys and girls were housed. This resulted in a major embarrassment for the Freedom Party as it became the target of unusually vocal criticism from Baptist and Pentecostal leaders in the Confederacy. When questioned, many of the girls who became pregnant simply said that they 'wanted to show a bit of Confederate hospitality.'
“King’s Peddlers.” Sounds fitting.
 
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I wonder if the Confederate states of Sonora and Chihuahua would also be created into a separate nation in order to have one less area for the US to occupy and also absorb some of the millions of disgruntled and bitter former confederates?

Also I wonder if there would be widespread movement of Confederates from the occupied Confederacy to nations such as Mexico, South Africa and Australia. All nations would probably welcome these migrants as a way to increase their populations or shore up their power base.
They’d never flee to a non-English speaking nation, but many, particularly former Freedom Party officials and personnel would flee abroad. South Africa in particular would welcome them with open arms if their racial policies are the same as OTL. In After the End many actually land significant positions in the apartheid regime.
 
They’d never flee to a non-English speaking nation, but many, particularly former Freedom Party officials and personnel would flee abroad. South Africa in particular would welcome them with open arms if their racial policies are the same as OTL. In After the End many actually land significant positions in the apartheid regime.
I don’t know about never fleeing to a non-English speaking nation, if you’re fleeing a war ravaged region under military occupation where terrorism and retaliatory hostage taking and executions taking place, all of a sudden it becomes less important whether or not the places speak English or not.

Plus there is already historical precedent for ex confederates moving to Latin America such as in Brazil or Mexico. Since Brazil is an American ally in this TL, they probably won’t want to accept many Confederate immigrants. I can see Latin America being more of a choice of less affluent Confederates looking to escape the occupied confederacy while the more well to do elites still choose locations such as South Africa or Rhodesia.

Australia being a former entente power and having the “White Australia” policy would definitely want to welcome in the White Confederates, which could definitively greatly affect the Australian culture and self concept of the “Australian Nation.”
 
I wonder if the Confederate states of Sonora and Chihuahua would also be created into a separate nation in order to have one less area for the US to occupy and also absorb some of the millions of disgruntled and bitter former confederates?

I don't think so. Sonora and Chihuahua have pretty low population in OTL too so these should are pretty easy to control. Furthermore probably these states are more loyal for US government than Deep Southern states since Sonora and Chihuahua had less love over Featherston and CSA than for example Alabama, Mississippi or Florida.

Also I wonder if there would be widespread movement of Confederates from the occupied Confederacy to nations such as Mexico, South Africa and Australia. All nations would probably welcome these migrants as a way to increase their populations or shore up their power base.

There would be lot of immigrations to other nations. Altough South Africa probably would require Confederate exiles Afrikanise themselves completely what they hardly are willingful to do.

They’d never flee to a non-English speaking nation, but many, particularly former Freedom Party officials and personnel would flee abroad. South Africa in particular would welcome them with open arms if their racial policies are the same as OTL. In After the End many actually land significant positions in the apartheid regime.

Nazis pretty happily fled to South America, speciality to Argentina. And if you are in risk being arrested, prosecuted and hanged from yours war crimes and crimes against humanity you are not going to be very picky. You take whatever place where you are safe.
 
I wonder if the Confederate states of Sonora and Chihuahua would also be created into a separate nation in order to have one less area for the US to occupy and also absorb some of the millions of disgruntled and bitter former confederates?

Also I wonder if there would be widespread movement of Confederates from the occupied Confederacy to nations such as Mexico, South Africa and Australia. All nations would probably welcome these migrants as a way to increase their populations or shore up their power base.
Well likely if South Africa's timeline remainds mostly the same as OTL than yeah I imagine many Confederates would flee to SA, second to Australia as well
 

kernel

Gone Fishin'
Depnlq5UYAEl-2Y.jpg
A picture of the 1964 presidential debate, featuring Republican candidate Eugene McCarthy (second from left), Democratic candidate Joe Kennedy Jr. (second from right), and Socialist candidate Joe McCarthy (farthest right). Eugene McCarthy would go on to win the election, which was widely seen as a sign that the New Left, represented by the left wing of the Republican Party, was beginning to replace the Old Left, represented by the Socialist Party, and that Remembrance Ideology was beginning to be challenged.

Eugene McCarthy would try to use a "soft approach" to deal with the Southern insurgency, believing that the main reason for the violence was corruption in occupation authorities as well as a lack of economic opportunities for Southerners. He reduced troop levels in the South and rolled out plans of rural electrification and poverty reduction. However, McCarthy's presidency would not last long. After the New Year's Battles of 1967, McCarthy would resign. Barry Goldwater, vice president under McCarthy and a hardliner against the South, would assume the presidency.
 
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Depnlq5UYAEl-2Y.jpg
A picture of the 1964 presidential debate, featuring Republican candidate Eugene McCarthy (second from left), Democratic candidate Joe Kennedy Jr. (second from right), and Socialist candidate Joe McCarthy (farthest right). Eugene McCarthy would go on to win the election, which was widely seen as a sign that the New Left, represented by the left wing of the Republican Party, was beginning to replace the Old Left, represented by the Socialist Party, and that Remembrance Ideology was beginning to be challenged.
I Can definitely see it taking at least a generation before Remembrance ideology is seriously challenged. During this time were the practices of hostage taking and retaliatory execution still being utilized by the US occupation forces?
Eugene McCarthy would try to use a "soft approach" to deal with the Southern insurgency, believing that the main reason for the violence was corruption in occupation authorities as well as a lack of economic opportunities for Southerners. He reduced troop levels in the South and rolled out plans of rural electrification and poverty reduction in much of the South. However, McCarthy's presidency would not last long. After the New Year's Battles of 1967, McCarthy would resign. Barry Goldwater, vice president under McCarthy and a hardliner against the South, would assume the presidency.
I’m interested to know what the New Year’s battles are all about.
 

kernel

Gone Fishin'
I Can definitely see it taking at least a generation before Remembrance ideology is seriously challenged. During this time were the practices of hostage taking and retaliatory execution still being utilized by the US occupation forces?
Yes, hostage taking and execution, along with mass prison camps, arbitrary detention, and torture is still being used in the South.

I’m interested to know what the New Year’s battles are all about.
I've quoted my old post here, but I've changed a few minor things which I've italicized.
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American university students burning Conscription Cards in the 1960s as part of the Anti-Occupation Movement

After the fall and occupation of the Confederacy, the United States adopted a program of mandatory national service of one to two years for anyone turning eighteen years of age. Most of these conscripts would be placed on occupation duty in the South and in Canada, while others were sent to fight in proxy wars in Latin America. During the 1950s , popular support remained high for the program as citizens believed that they were doing good in the world by participating in the De-Freedomization of the south and fighting against Japanese and European (esp. German) imperialism.

However, the early 1960s saw massive upheavals in the former Confederacy, as the population there became tired of the heavy-handedness and authoritarianism of the U.S. government. Protests began peacefully, composed of nonviolent movements such as the Southern Dignity Movement that called for the restoration of civilian government, civil liberties, and greater economic aid for Southern territories of the U.S. However, as the U.S. began to crackdown on these demonstrations, many Southerners became radicalized into far-right and far-left groups, and began waging a full blown insurgency against the U.S. government. In the beginning, the United States downplayed the extent of the war (going so far as to deny the war was occurring and declaring that an increased number of conscripts being sent to the South was only for "police action.")

However, the New Year Battles of 1967 saw coordinated insurgent attacks on cities such as Atlanta, Montgomery, Jackson, New Orleans, and Nashville. People watched on their television screens as American troops battled street by street against battle hardened Neo-Freedomite militias. As body bags began coming home, public opinion, which had already been turning against the war during the Storm of '64, became heavily divided between supporting or opposing the occupation. College students could be seen demonstrating and burning Conscription Cards, as well as adopting Countercultural practices against what they saw as the conservative and militaristic ("sometimes they called it actionist") Remembrance Ideology of their forefathers.

The protest movements of the 1960s spread globally, and marked a political turning point in many nations. In Germany, demonstrators called for an end to colonialism and greater social freedoms for the population. While Russia and Japan were more heavy-handed with the suppression of demonstrations, an underground counterculture movement blossomed with smuggling of banned texts and conversations about politically taboo ideas.
 
Yes, hostage taking and execution, along with mass prison camps, arbitrary detention, and torture is still being used in the South.
The prison camps are pretty ironic due to a huge part of US nation building and rememberance ideology is being against what the Confederacy stood for and practiced
I've quoted my old post here, but I've changed a few minor things which I've italicized.
This a very well thought out post and I can see it being a very likely post war scenario

It seems that the African American community might actually be one of the communities most dedicated to the continued military occupation of the South. Although African ancestry immigrant groups would have less incentive and emotional/mental attachment to keep the South Occupied
 
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kernel

Gone Fishin'
It seems that the African American community might actually be one of the communities most dedicated to the continued military occupation of the South. Although African ancestry immigrant groups would have less incentive and emotional/mental attachment to keep the South Occupied
Yeah. Out of a surviving population of 7 million, approximately two million black southerners settled in the United States (mostly in New Africa, a state made up of what used to be Utah and also in the US's Caribbean territories). African Americans are very hardline on the Southern issue and are one of the most conservative ethnic groups in the United States. They are a core constituency of the Democratic Party and support right wing candidates (like Cuban Americans otl).

In the 1990s, African Americans heavily protested the independence of the South, and lent their support to Clarence Thomas, who ran a primary challenge from the right against Joe Kennedy Jr. in 1988 . This opposition somewhat mellowed when John Lewis, an Afro-Southerner, was elected the first president of the post-occupation Confederacy.
 
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Victory at Last(?): The Starcie in 1980s

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Ex-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, leader of the FZP from 1984 until the end of Starcie, in a very Cardinal-seque uniform (which was made specially for him, with the slogan “For and By the Polish People” in Polish on the backside of the crucifix necklace, in the early 1980s.
“The FZP is a fighting force for the people! By the people! If the people wish us to fight then with God’s help we shall! This is a new FZP, one that will not be responsible for the deaths of innocents if it can be helped. Our enemies are not the civilians of the Greater Polish Region; the enemy is not the Polish manager or workers of a local grocery whose only crime is that they do business with German troops, it is not the policeman in Poznan descended from German settlers who only wishes to serve the community that he grew up in and protect those who live in it, it is not the German child in Munich who’s father is a Fallschimjäger serving in Greater Poland. Our enemies are, and have always been, the German military and settler paramilitaries that terrorise our people – the Catholic Polish People! With the Lord’s guidance I know that victory over the (German) State and reunification with the rest of Poland will soon be upon us all and this blood soaked nightmare will be over! Amen.”
— FZP Council Chairman Joseph Ratzinger, 1984.
“He talks about how us civilians aren’t their enemy but how can he say that when FZP bombs keep claiming the lives of innocent civilians – German Protestants and Polish Catholics alike?!”
— Anonymous German-Polish citizen interviewed by an American journalist in 1984.
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Aftermath, of the 1981 Frankfurt bombing by the FZP which claimed 156 lives and left countless wounded or maimed along with causing millions upon millions of Reichsmarks worth of damage.
As 1983 turned to 1984, it seemed that victory for the FZP was within hand — a united Poland and an end to German rule. The Loyalist one-party state that had ruled the Greater Polish Region for decades had gone and in its place the German government ruled directly from Berlin but seemed uncertain about continuing to rule the region and whether or not the Greater Polish Region should unite with the Kingdom of Poland as the internal security situation got ever worse. It looked like as though the FZP’s dream was just more one bombing away. A new FZP leadership had emerged under a former man of the cloth – ex-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger who had been made a cardinal in mid 1962 (one of youngest cardinals in the history of the Roman Catholic Church at only 35 years of age), the Church’s official stance in the Starcie had been one of neutrality, condemning both sides for the violence, and calls to hammer out an agreement to end the bloodshed. Ratzinger was removed from his position as a cardinal and then defrocked for his outspoken support for the FZP and a united Poland (though not all that radical) in 1974.

Afterwards, the former Cardinal travelled to the Special Polish Region via the Polish-German border and joined the FZP eventually rising through the ranks and becoming the new leader of the ruling Front council. Once in power, Ratzinger made efforts to switch tactics and focus solely on the German Army in Greater Poland and the Prussian Defense League paramilitary and start the arduous peace process that would be known as the “Greater Poland Peace Accords” although civilians deaths remained high for much of the 1980s.
 
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Victory at Last(?): The Starcie in 1980s

View attachment 866451

Ex-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, leader of the FZP from 1984 until the end of Starcie, in a very Cardinal-seque uniform (which he made specially for him, with the slogan “For and By the Polish People” in Polish on the backside of the crucifix necklace, in the early 1980s.
“The FZP is a fighting force for the people! By the people! If the people wish us to fight then with God’s help we shall! This is a new FZP, one that will not be responsible for the deaths of innocents if it can be helped. Our enemies are not the civilians of the Greater Polish Region, the enemy is not the Polish manager or workers of a local grocery whose only crime is that they do business with German troops, it is not the policeman in Poznan descended from German settlers who only wishes to serve and protect the community that he grew up in and those who live in it, it is not the German child in Munich who’s father is a Fallschimjäger serving in Greater Poland. Our enemies are, and have always been, the German military and settler paramilitaries that terrorise our people – the Catholic Polish People! With the Lord’s guidance I know that victory over the (German) State and reunification with the rest of Poland will soon be upon us all and this blood soaked nightmare will be over! Amen!!”
— FZP Council Chairman Joseph Ratzinger, 1984.
“He talks about how us civilians aren’t their enemy but how can he say that when FZP bombs keep claiming the lives of innocent civilians – German Protestants and Polish Catholics alike?!”
— Anonymous German-Polish citizen interviewed by an American journalist in 1984.
View attachment 866474
Aftermath, of the 1981 Frankfurt bombing by the FZP which claimed 156 lives and left countless wounded or maimed along causing millions upon millions of Reichsmarks worth of damage.
As 1983 turned to 1984, it seemed that victory for the FZP was near — the Loyalist one-party state that had ruled the Greater Polish Region for decades had gone and was replaced by direct German rule from Berlin and a rule seemed to be seriously questioning whether it wanted to continue ruling the region as the internal security situation got ever worse. It looked like as though the FZP’s dream of a united Poland and of freedom from German rule was just one bombing away. A new FZP leadership had emerged under a former man of cloth – ex-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger who had been made a cardinal in the mid 1962 (one of youngest cardinals in the history of the Roman Catholic Church at only 35 years of age), the Church’s official stance in the Starcie had been one of neutrality, condemning both sides for the violence, and calls to hammer out an agreement to end the bloodshed. Ratzinger was removed from his position as a cardinal and then defrocked for his outspoken support for the FZP and a united Poland (though not all that radical) in 1974.

Afterwards, the former Cardinal travelled to the Special Polish Region via the Polish-German border and joined the FZP eventually rising through the ranks and becoming the new leader of the ruling Front council. Once in power, Ratzinger made efforts to switch tactics and focus solely on the German Army in Greater Poland and the Prussian Defense League paramilitary though civilians deaths remained high.
Thanks man, I liked this post
 
The Dark Future of a AU 1962.

Southern Victory: Last Days of America.

Or the TNO version of TL-191.

the-world-map-where-the-confederate-states-of-america-won-v0-8qu0l274wqxb1.png




It is the year 1962. A hundred years ago, the Confederate Army under Robert E. Lee crushed the Union’s at the Battle of Camp Hill, giving the CSA a bargaining chip via the capture of Philadelphia. As the delegates signed the peace treaty that ended the war days later, nobody could have foreseen that this is just the beginning of something even bigger….

In the New World, the victorious Confederacy dominates its neighbors around the Caribbean and across the Americas with impunity. Over in the Old World, Kaiserreich is still mending its wounds from the Second Great War, eager to avenge its defeat. Across the frozen tundras of Finland, the banks of the Yangtze, and the islands of Japan, the Tsardom’s flag flies without opposition, the people in its shadow fearing the wrath of Russia should they dare resist.

Yet while these superpowers duke it out in the fields of politics and in battle, some nations remain cautious on who to side with. The nascent Indian Commonwealth and its rival in Bharat look over the demarcation line set after the Raj’s collapse, wary of each other's intentions. The Argentinian State and the Empire of Brazil likewise do the same, both eager to spread their influence on the whole of South America. Yet others like the ailing British Empire wish to reseek their glory once more, wondering if the Germans or the Russians may aid them in their goal.

But over in the American Anarchy, something stirs inside the chaotic plains and cities that once were part of the old United States. Past the Great Lakes, remains of the federal government, fascists, leftists, and others clash to see who might gain the glory of reviving the Shining City on the Hill.
 
The Dark Future of a AU 1962.

Southern Victory: Last Days of America.

Or the TNO version of TL-191.

the-world-map-where-the-confederate-states-of-america-won-v0-8qu0l274wqxb1.png




It is the year 1962. A hundred years ago, the Confederate Army under Robert E. Lee crushed the Union’s at the Battle of Camp Hill, giving the CSA a bargaining chip via the capture of Philadelphia. As the delegates signed the peace treaty that ended the war days later, nobody could have foreseen that this is just the beginning of something even bigger….

In the New World, the victorious Confederacy dominates its neighbors around the Caribbean and across the Americas with impunity. Over in the Old World, Kaiserreich is still mending its wounds from the Second Great War, eager to avenge its defeat. Across the frozen tundras of Finland, the banks of the Yangtze, and the islands of Japan, the Tsardom’s flag flies without opposition, the people in its shadow fearing the wrath of Russia should they dare resist.

Yet while these superpowers duke it out in the fields of politics and in battle, some nations remain cautious on who to side with. The nascent Indian Commonwealth and its rival in Bharat look over the demarcation line set after the Raj’s collapse, wary of each other's intentions. The Argentinian State and the Empire of Brazil likewise do the same, both eager to spread their influence on the whole of South America. Yet others like the ailing British Empire wish to reseek their glory once more, wondering if the Germans or the Russians may aid them in their goal.

But over in the American Anarchy, something stirs inside the chaotic plains and cities that once were part of the old United States. Past the Great Lakes, remains of the federal government, fascists, leftists, and others clash to see who might gain the glory of reviving the Shining City on the Hill.
Wow. They really stuffed the Canadian bear full
 
Victory at Last(?): The Starcie in 1980s

View attachment 866451

Ex-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, leader of the FZP from 1984 until the end of Starcie, in a very Cardinal-seque uniform (which was made specially for him, with the slogan “For and By the Polish People” in Polish on the backside of the crucifix necklace, in the early 1980s.
“The FZP is a fighting force for the people! By the people! If the people wish us to fight then with God’s help we shall! This is a new FZP, one that will not be responsible for the deaths of innocents if it can be helped. Our enemies are not the civilians of the Greater Polish Region; the enemy is not the Polish manager or workers of a local grocery whose only crime is that they do business with German troops, it is not the policeman in Poznan descended from German settlers who only wishes to serve the community that he grew up in and protect those who live in it, it is not the German child in Munich who’s father is a Fallschimjäger serving in Greater Poland. Our enemies are, and have always been, the German military and settler paramilitaries that terrorise our people – the Catholic Polish People! With the Lord’s guidance I know that victory over the (German) State and reunification with the rest of Poland will soon be upon us all and this blood soaked nightmare will be over! Amen.”
— FZP Council Chairman Joseph Ratzinger, 1984.
“He talks about how us civilians aren’t their enemy but how can he say that when FZP bombs keep claiming the lives of innocent civilians – German Protestants and Polish Catholics alike?!”
— Anonymous German-Polish citizen interviewed by an American journalist in 1984.
View attachment 866474
Aftermath, of the 1981 Frankfurt bombing by the FZP which claimed 156 lives and left countless wounded or maimed along with causing millions upon millions of Reichsmarks worth of damage.
As 1983 turned to 1984, it seemed that victory for the FZP was within hand — a united Poland and an end to German rule. The Loyalist one-party state that had ruled the Greater Polish Region for decades had gone and in its place the German government ruled directly from Berlin but seemed uncertain about continuing to rule the region and whether or not the Greater Polish Region should unite with the Kingdom of Poland as the internal security situation got ever worse. It looked like as though the FZP’s dream was just more one bombing away. A new FZP leadership had emerged under a former man of the cloth – ex-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger who had been made a cardinal in mid 1962 (one of youngest cardinals in the history of the Roman Catholic Church at only 35 years of age), the Church’s official stance in the Starcie had been one of neutrality, condemning both sides for the violence, and calls to hammer out an agreement to end the bloodshed. Ratzinger was removed from his position as a cardinal and then defrocked for his outspoken support for the FZP and a united Poland (though not all that radical) in 1974.

Afterwards, the former Cardinal travelled to the Special Polish Region via the Polish-German border and joined the FZP eventually rising through the ranks and becoming the new leader of the ruling Front council. Once in power, Ratzinger made efforts to switch tactics and focus solely on the German Army in Greater Poland and the Prussian Defense League paramilitary though civilians deaths remained high.

Anything about (before, during and after) Cardinal Ratzinger automatically gets my attention. But I'm not familiar with the historical background that you decided as to his fate in TL-191.

A pro-Polish German mercenary?

A bit jarring, but it is a generally positive portrayal, I guess.
 
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