Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

I finished reading through these works and am amazed and praise all those who contribute. I do have a question though. Why do so many posts seem to indicate neo-freedmites are around long after the war. The US almost certainly would have labeled such groups as terriorists and treated them as such.
 
I finished reading through these works and am amazed and praise all those who contribute. I do have a question though. Why do so many posts seem to indicate neo-freedmites are around long after the war. The US almost certainly would have labeled such groups as terriorists and treated them as such.
I suppose the same reason why there are Neo-nazis in Germany. It's a group that you can't really destroy since they base themselves off of an idea, and ideas are something that you can't destroy, no matter how much you try to suppress it.
 
I suppose the same reason why there are Neo-nazis in Germany. It's a group that you can't really destroy since they base themselves off of an idea, and ideas are something that you can't destroy, no matter how much you try to suppress it.
That makes sense but given the fact that the U.S was already commiting atrocities and shooting civilians they wouldn't hesitate to kill those associated with that group. Also wouldn't the likely long occupation lead to a de-Freedomite policy of sorts? There was an interesting TL-191 thread called After the End that suggested one way the US was going to keep these places under control was to have military occupation and encouraging new immigrants to move to the South to settle the region.
 
I finished reading through these works and am amazed and praise all those who contribute. I do have a question though. Why do so many posts seem to indicate neo-freedmites are around long after the war. The US almost certainly would have labeled such groups as terriorists and treated them as such.

Somethings are just too hard to kill
 
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Tugboats alongside the captured Confederate battlecruiser USS Camp Hill in New York City, circa September of 1944. Following her surrender at Tampa Bay alongside with the remnants of the Confederate Navy, the Camp Hill alongside other former Confederate warships would be taken to the Brooklyn Naval Yard, where they and their components would be examined and cataloged, and some would even be removed from the ships for further study onshore. During this time, the ship would be commissioned into the US Navy as USS Camp Hill, with the hull number of IX-300. In August of 1945, the battlecruiser alongside other former Confederate warships would be used in Operation Crossroads at Vairaatea Atoll (formerly part of the French Empire) in the South Pacific, which they and old some Union warships would be used for target practice for a pair of superbombs. In the days following the Baker test, the Camp Hill, having sustained heavy damage, would take on a severe list, and on the night of 29/30th of August, the ship would capsize.
 
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That makes sense but given the fact that the U.S was already commiting atrocities and shooting civilians they wouldn't hesitate to kill those associated with that group. Also wouldn't the likely long occupation lead to a de-Freedomite policy of sorts? There was an interesting TL-191 thread called After the End that suggested one way the US was going to keep these places under control was to have military occupation and encouraging new immigrants to move to the South to settle the region.
Military occupation doesn't completely remove a belief. Reconstruction in the South didn't work, the occupation of Germany didn't work either. All you can do is try to change a majority of the population's beliefs and hope that you don't have to deal with it again 20 years down the line.
 
Military occupation doesn't completely remove a belief. Reconstruction in the South didn't work, the occupation of Germany didn't work either. All you can do is try to change a majority of the population's beliefs and hope that you don't have to deal with it again 20 years down the line.
That's true, but reconstruction didn't make the effort to do that with all the active resistance and ended after only a decade. In Germany, the need for a long strong ally against Communism ensured that they didn't go too deep. The Soviets weren't any better of course but in this case neither side cared since as long as the government didn't officially support those ideas they would be fine. The Confederacy on the other hand is going to be annexed and become future citizens and influence the US which would be motivation enough to ensure they don't bring down the nation this way.
 
That's true, but reconstruction didn't make the effort to do that with all the active resistance and ended after only a decade. In Germany, the need for a long strong ally against Communism ensured that they didn't go too deep. The Soviets weren't any better of course but in this case neither side cared since as long as the government didn't officially support those ideas they would be fine. The Confederacy on the other hand is going to be annexed and become future citizens and influence the US which would be motivation enough to ensure they don't bring down the nation this way.
The more you try to suppress something, the more it fights back. That's just how human nature is.

Remember, the US was still worried about what Japan would do, and they were suspicious about the relationship between themselves and Germany. The most that the US Occupation and Integration Authority could realistically hope for was turn the Freedom Party, Tin Hats, Redemption League, Red-Fighters, Tennessee Volunteers, and Knights of the Grey into fringe groups that had little public support.
 
Probably around the same amount that they made OTL.
Not sure about that. I always had the feeling that the main focus for the US was the Confederacy, and carriers would not be that useful against them, especially when land-based aircraft and bombers are better protected and can carry a larger payload. They probably just had enough to protect the mainland and the Sandwich Islands and that was it.

Also, there wasn't a large focus on Japan, so there wasn't a need for carrier to support an island hopping campaign.
 
Not sure about that. I always had the feeling that the main focus for the US was the Confederacy, and carriers would not be that useful against them, especially when land-based aircraft and bombers are better protected and can carry a larger payload. They probably just had enough to protect the mainland and the Sandwich Islands and that was it.

Also, there wasn't a large focus on Japan, so there wasn't a need for carrier to support an island hopping campaign.
Right, so that means less would be produced, but still, I can still see a handful of fleet carriers being built during the war, especially to replace lost ships.
 
A Capital Ship recognition chart for the US Navy made in 1941 just before the outbreak of the Second Great War.
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I'm shocked that Argentina didn't lose it's two battleships when things settled down in South America she was facing Chile and Brazil alone.

Haiti had some old predreadnoughts that is definitely more than they achieved in otl lol.

I like that you have a second remembrance class carrier always felt that she should have.

Ranger equales Sandwich Islands I can see it as she is described as the First purpose built carrier. But Carson also mentions that she has three sisters so I always vied her as the Yorktown and they skipped the Ranger type.

Love it keep up the good work.
 
The 10th Motorized Cavalry Brigade
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A photograph of troops from the Polish 10th Motorized Cavalry Brigade (aka the Black Brigade) under the command of Colonel Stanislaw Maczek during the Battle of Warsaw, circa 1942. This unit was first formed in 1938 by the Polish Army as a rapid deployment force with large numbers of barrels and other armored vehicles, in which this unit would go on to fight throughout the Second Great War.​
 
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