Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

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US Infantryman training on the Winchester Machine Gun Model of 1947 (typically shortened to MG-47) LMG, Circa 1983.

Developed from the CSA's Model 1940 LMG from Marlin arms, the US weapon retains its inspiration's high rate of fire and quick-barrel change feature, and has proven a valuable asset in the hands of the USA and her client states. Following its trial by fire in the Peruvian War of 1950-1953 in the hands of AFCA (Anti-Freedomite Coalition of the Americas) in stonewalling the Freedomite forces of North Peru, the MG-47 rapidly spread out across the Americas and across the Central-powers aligned world, where the weapon remains in service to this day in the arsenals of over 20 countries.

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MG-47 mounted on an M3 "Pound" General Combat Barrel, circa 1991. In addition to its infantry role, the MG-47 would see frequent use mounted on Barrels throughout the "Post-Bellum" and "Rose Bowl" periods in the US military, where tank crews found the gun easier to handle than the bulky Browning .50 caliber weapons that preceded them.

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German/Swiss Maschingewehr-1951, based directly on the MG-47. These weapons would see heavy use in German and Austrian hands in the 1960's during the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian empire, where after the gun would be utilized alongside export versions of its American predecessor by the menagerie of states that the Balkans devolved into.
 
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1939: a period of Cordiality.
Left to right during the U.S. Army war maneuvers and sham-battle invasion of New England by a mythical "enemy" are Col. Takatoshi Nakamura, Japanese Military Attache, Brig. General Walter C. Short, Commander of the 1st Division "Blue" Army, and Lieut. General Friederich von Boetticher, German Military Attache, as they watch the maneuvers. Short would go on to command US forces during the Mormon rebellion, and would later command an Infantry division during Irving Morrell's push into Georgia. Nakamura would soon be recalled to Japan as tensions with the USA flared once more, but would return to his duties in the USA following Japan's alliance of Convenience with the Central Powers during the Second Great War. General Von Boetticher remained in the USA throughout the Second Great War, where his connections to German intelliegence proved crucial in garnering German cooperation in the development of the USA's Superbomb.


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Finnish, German, Austrian , Italian, American, Quebecois and Japanese officers seen in Helsinki in 1948 to ratify the "Northern Alliance Accords" a quasi-alliance of Northern European and Asian states to engineer a more peaceful world order in the wake of the Second Great War. Among the agreements in the accords was the grudging but unavoidable recognition of Japan as the dominant power in eastern Asia and of her sphere of influence, as well as a mild degree of greater autonomy for Quebec and the inclusion of Italy, who had subtly moved into several French and British colonies in Africa during the waning days of the Second Great War, in decisions regarding the African continent. Finland, carved out of the doddering Russian Empire by army nationalists and German-backed republicans, was declared a German protectorate state, and trade deals between the signatories, as well as their own client states, were ratified, as was the divvying up of seized military assets from the Allied powers.
Finland and Italy got the pick of the CSA's air force and Barrel assets, Italy in particular making great use of CSA aircraft designs while Finland reveled in replacing their worn-out Russian and German Barrel models with modern ex-CSA designs. Japan's ownership of those British colonies in the Pacific it had seized was recognized, and the Japanese navy was able to pilfer several British Whittle turbojet prototypes for their own study and analysis, as well as modern Y-ranging and sonar technology.
Quebec, meanwhile, received a small battlegroup's worth of warships from the Royal Navy, including, in a bit of irony, the old Battleship HMS Canada. Italy, for her part, divided the French navy between themselves and the Austrians. Finland, With only the Baltic to concern themselves with, was content to receive the French Heavy Cruiser Algerie and a squadron of British destroyers, as well as several French Submarines. Consideration was also given for the Irish, the Ottomans, and the Dutch, as well as Haiti and those African territories under US and German control, all of which saw an upgrade to their local arsenals with materials and equipment seized from the Allies.
 
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A B-29 Superfortress bomber named FiFi as flown by the US Air Force's Memorial Squadron, circa 1997.

The B-29 Superfortress when it first entered service in 1944, was the most technologically advanced bomber of it's day featuring state-of-the-art developments such as remote controlled gun turrets, pressurized cabins, and most importantly, the capability to deliver Superbombs without risking the plane and crew to the blast (in which the plane could quickly get away beforehand.) The bomber would have a hellish development time, so much so, that by the time of introduction into service, the B29 program would prove to be more expensive than even the Superbomb Program. The B-29 would be famous in delivering the two Superbombs on the Confederate cities of Newport News and Charleston in July of 1944 (in which the respective carriers of the bombs were named Enola Gay and Bockscar.) Its other roles during the Second Great War with the USAF were as a high altitude reconnaissance plane (in which most Confederate fighters and all of the anti-aircraft artillery lacked the capability to reach the same height as the B-29 with the exception of the TC-44 Bird-Dog and a couple of other designs.)
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The B-29 named Enola Gay at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, circa 2017. In 1946, the USAF would donate the Enola Gay to the Smithsonian to be put on display.

The B-29 Superfortress would used by the USAF after the Second Great War, at first as a both a bomber and a reconnaissance plane, but later in other roles such as a aerial refueling tanker, weather plane, and even as a testbed for new post-war technologies before being retired in 1960.
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An RB-50 Superfortress at Remembrance AFB near Philedelphia, circa 1957. An improvement of the B-29, the B-50 would see the installation of new engines as well as fuel tanks that had extended their range and would serve with the USAF until 1965.
 
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Japan never "switched" sides, but rather went its own way. Anne Coleton said herself in TGW that they really only looked out for themselves, hence why they got out of the Great War practically scratch-free.
 
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The Italian Regia Marina Battleship Roma in La Spezia preparing to embark in a Neutrality Patrol in Ligurian Sea, circa 1942. The Roma was the second member of the Italia class Battleship, which the class is widely considered by many naval historians as being one of the finest of the last generation of battleships to be constructed, although none of the four ships in the class ever fired a shot in anger during their whole careers from the 1940s thru the early 1980s. Throughout the whole duration of the Second Great War, the Regia Marina would conduct so-called Neutrality Patrols around Italian territorial waters and around the Italian possession of Libya, Eritrea, and Italian Somaliland.
 
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French Battleship MN Richelieu exiting the Hampton Roads following a courtesy visit to the Confederate Naval base, circa 1940. France's relationship with the CSA, particularly during the Actionist period, is often undersold in the historical memory of the Second Great War compared to the relationship between the CSA and the UK, but if anything, Paris was Politically closer to Richmond than London was.
Besides the sharing of military strategy and tactics that would be crucial to both nation's early successes in the Second Great War, the French also aided greatly with Confederate Naval procurement, constructing several modern Battleships based on their Dunkerque-class design as well as supporting the CSAF's Airplane development via secret joint testing facilities in Mexico and French Guiana.
French forces also took inspiration from their Confederate Counterparts, in particular the Actionist organization's personal militia, the Garde Impériale, who were directly based on the Freedom Party Guards, including the wearing of Camouflage uniforms and even some Confederate-style affectations such as slouch hats.

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Garde Impériale infantryman, Summer 1943. He is armed with a Paratrooper version of the MAS 36 rifle that has a folding stock. This can be taken as indicative of the desperate situation France is in at this point in the war, as most elite troops would have been carrying the automatic MAS-40, which was based on the Confederate Tredegar M1938.
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the MAS-40 automatic rifle. Based on the Tredegar so eponymous with the CSA, French production difficulties meant it never became as common as its CSA counterpart, forcing the French to issue older bolt-action weapons in front-line units.
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By Contrast, the MAT-39 submachine gun, with its simple construction and ease of use, to say nothing of its common 9mm Parabellum ammunition, was so readily available (and so many were captured) that both the Germans and British had official designations for it in their service, and even the CSA made efforts to replicate its simplicity of function and portability in their M1944 model SMG.
 
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In one of their last photos together, Kaiser Wilhelm II (center) stands for a photograph with his son, the future Wilhelm III (left) and Grandson, who would have been the future Wilhelm IV (right)
The Waning Days of Wilhelm II's rule saw a large uptick in socialist and extremist politics in the German Empire, not helped by the large influx of underground Communists who came under Germany's rule following the Great War and the economic strain needed to both garrison their occupied territory and keep their ally Austria-Hungary from collapsing under its own failures. With Wilhelm II's less-than-effective leadership and increasing withdrawal from the responsibilities of rule, as well as his declining health, Wilhelm III indeed served as something of a Prince Regent in the latter quarter of the 1930's, with the tacit backing of the Military and the conservatives in the Reichstag.

While an espoused German nationalist, Wilhelm III, following his father's death and his ascension, nevertheless sought a diplomatic solution to the French and British demands for the return of Alsace-Lorraine and the "liberation" of Belgium, despite clear intentions from the Allied powers to declare war regardless of the outcome. Seeing the results of the US plebiscites in their occupied states amount to nothing, as the CSA badgered for more regardless, Wilhelm refused the Allied demands, which led to the Entente powers launching a series of coordinated attacks on German holdings in France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

While Germany had lost a great deal of its centralized military solidity in the aftermath of the Great War to Bureaucracy and politicking, the German Army was nonetheless still a sharp sword, and they managed to stonewall Entente efforts to invade Germany itself from the West while, alongside Austria, Bulgaria and the Ottomans, succeeded in warding off Russian attacks from the East. Some aid came early in the war when the UK made the mistake of their "protective occupation" of Norway, which turned the Scandinavian nations away from the Entente and brought Norway and Denmark into the War, opening up bases for German use in those countries as well as providing resources and technical assistance to the Central Powers. Italy meanwhile, while not officially joining the war, nevertheless made it clear they would not interfere with any movements of their old adversary Austria, likely hoping to scoop up some British and French territorial holdings in Africa.

An Early tragedy struck the House of Hohenzollern when Prince Wilhelm IV was killed fighting the French in late 1941, which may have contributed to a resolve to see through the war on the part of his father, who privately damned the British and French for "forcing another war" on the German people. The death of the Crown Prince so early in his father's rule also served to unite the German people in a desire for revenge, and memories of the shortages and hardships of the First Great War were forgotten.

By the Winter of 1941-42, the Entente's advances had effectively been halted, and indeed the Central Powers were beginning to push them back.​
 
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In one of their last photos together, Kaiser Wilhelm II (center) stands for a photograph with his son, the future Wilhelm III (left) and Grandson, who would have been the future Wilhelm IV (right)
The Waning Days of Wilhelm II's rule saw a large uptick in socialist and extremist politics in the German Empire, not helped by the large influx of underground Communists who came under Germany's rule following the Great War and the economic strain needed to both garrison their occupied territory and keep their ally Austria-Hungary from collapsing under its own failures. With Wilhelm II's less-than-effective leadership and increasing withdrawal from the responsibilities of rule, as well as his declining health, Wilhelm III indeed served as something of a Prince Regent in the latter quarter of the 1930's, with the tacit backing of the Military and the conservatives in the Reichstag.

While an espoused German nationalist, Wilhelm III, following his father's death and his ascension, nevertheless sought a diplomatic solution to the French and British demands for the return of Alsace-Lorraine and the "liberation" of Belgium, despite clear intentions from the Allied powers to declare war regardless of the outcome. Seeing the results of the US plebiscites in their occupied states amount to nothing, as the CSA badgered for more regardless, Wilhelm refused the Allied demands, which led to the Entente powers launching a series of coordinated attacks on German holdings in France, Belgium and the Netherlands.

While Germany had lost a great deal of its centralized military solidity in the aftermath of the Great War to Bureaucracy and politicking, the German Army was nonetheless still a sharp sword, and they managed to stonewall Entente efforts to invade Germany itself from the West while, alongside Austria, Bulgaria and the Ottomans, succeeded in warding off Russian attacks from the East. Some aid came early in the war when the UK made the mistake of their "protective occupation" of Norway, which turned the Scandinavian nations away from the Entente and brought Norway and Denmark into the War, opening up bases for German use in those countries as well as providing resources and technical assistance to the Central Powers. Italy meanwhile, while not officially joining the war, nevertheless made it clear they would not interfere with any movements of their old adversary Austria, likely hoping to scoop up some British and French territorial holdings in Africa.

An Early tragedy struck the House of Hohenzollern when Prince Wilhelm IV was killed fighting the French in late 1941, which may have contributed to a resolve to see through the war on the part of his father, who privately damned the British and French for "forcing another war" on the German people. The death of the Crown Prince so early in his father's rule also served to unite the German people in a desire for revenge, and memories of the shortages and hardships of the First Great War were forgotten.

By the Winter of 1941-42, the Entente's advances had effectively been halted, and indeed the Central Powers were beginning to push them back.​
Love it! I actually had the same idea planned to yours but you beat me to it. Pretty much similar to this but with some different elements, along with the same outcome for Prince Wilhelm of Prussia. I might as well make my take on it.
 
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