Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

I believe the Confederate version of the Medal of Honor was known as the Southern cross. Also the Naval equivalent of the Order of Lee was the Order of Virginia, which has a depiction of the ironclad C.S.S. Virginia.
 
Faces of the Unionized South

Although the Devastation gets more scholarly attention when studying the Demographics of the former Confederacy, research has revealed that the White Male population was drastically reduced, including underaged Confederates and retired-age Confederates. Featherston's refusal to surrender compelled him to get as many Whites from all walks of life to fight against the U.S. Army to the last drop of blood in its defense. Sometimes, the soldiers were young adolescents who were included among the war dead due to battle casualities or war crimes (see Boris Lavochkin). By the end of the war, most of the White males left in the Confederacy were either infants, children, and elders.

The gap in population allowed American citizens to settle down in the newly annexed C.S.A., where Yankee men often intermarried with Confederate women. The U.S. government encouraged immigration to both the conquered Confederacy and Canada from any nation on Earth who promised loyalty to the U.S.A. and the will to work and live a decent life. Notwithstanding the controversy of immigration problems that are brought up in American politics, the former Confederate States would eventually develop into one of the most multicultural and multiracial regions in the United States.

Here are some examples of individuals who were born and raised in what would be the Confederacy, but are not descendent from Black or White Confederate Ancestry.

Chinese Americans with Confederate Heritage

Chinese Texan

Mexican American descendent from Mexican Confederates
 
Last edited:
The Forgotten Campaign: The True Story of the Alaskan Front during the SGW Part 10
CAAF75E9-6C06-49D9-8DC3-F096F755BF4D_w1071_s.jpg

Imperial Russian Navy sailors during the Battle of New Archangel, circa 1944.

At the start of 1944, both sides on the Alaskan Front were building up their forces for the spring of 1944. The Yankees under General Devers were building up their forces for an offensive in the region which they had codenamed Operation: Watch Tower, which was to attack the enemy positions from the southern tip of Alaska to Dawson City along the banks of the Yukon River. They were also preparing for a few amphibious landings against Russian positions from Baranof Island to Kadyak Island as well as few potential landings against the Aleutians which they had coordinated with the Japanese Navy. On the Russian side of things, General Antonov and his forces has a large area to defend, from the south-eastern panhandle of Alaska to their holdings in the Yukon, to the vast coastline with the Northern Pacific to the Aleutian Islands.
ccfb22b61c45d38571371e7c6ba35463.jpg

Operation Watch Tower would commence on April 1st, 1944 when many Union division would simultaneously launch their attacks on Russians from the southern tip of mainland Alaska to the Yukon River.
Walcheren_Island_02.jpg

One that same day, the Union 5th Marine Division would launch their part of the offensive called Operation Seal, which they had landed on the Kruzof and Baranof Islands with the objective of capturing the port city of New Archangel, the capital of Russian America. Despite the air superiority and the naval support, the Marines would suffer huge casualties on H-Day and would take them days to secure the beach heads. Afterwards, the Union Marines with their naval gunfire and air support would fight against the entrenched Russian forces until on April 14th, would finally encircle New Archangel, thus placing the city under siege (though the Russian High Command and the Government for Russia had fled the scene to Nikolayevskaya some time before April 1st.)
sevastopol4.jpg

Russian sailors being briefed about their station sometime before H-Day, circa 1944. During the Battle of New Archangel, a majority of the defenders were either the Imperial Marines or disembarked Russian Navy sailors. The others would either be armed civilian militias, penal troops, regular army forces, token amount of Canadian Liberation Army troops, and the local territorial troops which were indigenous first nations people, which in total amounted to 6,100 soldiers.

By April 20th, the Union Army had managed to seize the port city of Novorossiysk, thus cutting the Russian forces in the southern panhandle off from the rest of Alaska. By that time, the fighting in the city of New Archangel was proving to be immense as the Russians there, as well in the other parts of the front, were determined to fight for every inch, among them were the Cossack troops from Alyaskan Host.
44306424031_3d50b5986b_b.jpg

Two Russian Cossack soldiers near the settlement of Volkova along the Tanana River shortly before the Battle of Volkova, circa 1944. The Cossacks, who had been in Alaska since the mid 1800s, had been in the Yukon for much of the war. But when the Union Army launched their spring offensive, the Cossack would see heavy action, often using their cavalry tactics against their enemies. In one particular battle at the hamlet of Volkova on April 25th, the Cossacks had covered the retreat of the remnants of the CLA's 4th Light Rifle Division by launching a mass cavalry charge against the elements of the Yankee 97th Light Infantry Division, causing mass death and confusion among the Union troops.
HtCT_9fW1gBtMcV0d7xW04ZLkbw7N5UTbHhyMfNOTyk.jpg

A Union soldier firing at Russian troops during a firefight at Serebryanyye Pruzhiny* with a captured SVT-40, circa April 29th. During the course of the Alaskan Front, many SVT-40, AVS-36, and Fedorov Rifles would fall into Union hands, and the Union troops would press them into service against their former owners much they had done with the Tredegar Automatic Rifles against the Confederates.
Groznyy-1942-HD.jpg

At sea, the last naval battle in the Pacific of the SGW was fought, on April 27th, a small flotilla consisting of the light cruiser Oleg and four destroyers would make an attempt to attack the Union supply base at Novorossiysk to disrupt Union supply lines there. Near the Yukatat Bay, the Russian flotilla would encounter the stronger Union forces which consisted of the heavy cruiser Salt Lake City and six destroyers. In that engagement, the Russians would lose two destroyers and another damaged with the Union forces suffering the loss of the destroyer USS Hart and three more damaged.

By May 4th, 1944, the Union offensive was largely successful, in which they had managed to conquer most of the southern panhandle of Alaska, most of the Yukon during the Russian counter-offensive in late 1941, and parts of Western Alaska. In spite of their success, the Union forces would suffer heavy casualties in the form of 7,000 men dead, 9,564 wounded, 100 missing, 7 barrels, 14 vehicles, and 32 aircraft destroyed. On that same day, the Russians would surrender on the European Front and General Antonov would ask for a cease fire with the Union forces. General Devers in response would accept Antonov's offer for a cease fire and starting on May 5th, would begin peace talks at the Union controlled city of Shelekovburg**. The Russian envoys were General Kirill Meretskov, Admiral Vitaly Fokin, and Aleksandr Kosygin, the Governor General of Russian America, while the Union envoys were Generals Walter Kreuger, Johnathan Wainright, and Jacob Devers himself. The negotiations would last until May 9th when as armistice was formalized, which would remain in effect until the signing of the Treaty of Hiroshima*** on September 2nd, 1945, which the treaty had dictated that all Union Troops in Alaska as well as the remaining Russian ones in Yukon were to withdraw from each others territory. (As an interesting side note, the Union side of the negotiations for the Treaty of Hiroshima had demanded that the Russians turn over all Canadian Liberation Army soldiers and Canadian Nationals in Russian custody to them. But the Russians would never agree to the Union demands, and it would all slide with the signing of the treaty. These Canadians would go on to form the Canadian-Alaskan (or Al-Can) Community in Russia.) This conflict between Russia and the United States as well as the Siberian War and the subsequent Treaty of Hiroshima would ultimately lead to the formation of the Tsardom of Alaska in 1948 following Tsar Mikhail II abdication in Russia by General Zhukov.

Final Loss Count for the Alaskan Front during the SGW (10/15/1941-5/9/1944.)​
NationKIAWIAPOW/MIAArtillery LostVehicle LossesAircraft LossesShip Losses
USA81,000156,00024,000/2,567975 Guns397 Vehicles513 Aircraft35 Warships, 540,000 GRT of Shipping, and 21 Submarines.
Russia94,000143,0042,000/3,4001,200 Guns365 Vehicles467 Aircraft22 Warships, 495,000 GRT of Shipping, and 16 Submarines
Japan (Until 1943)5,00011,000324/65494 Guns7 Vehicles83 Aircraft10 Warships and 143,000 GRT of Shipping
Canadian Liberation Army21,00024,00010,000/5,000106 Guns33 Vehicles21 AircraftN/A
Canadian Partisans4,000-7,500950-4,10055 POWN/AN/AN/AN/A

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* = Silver Springs
** = OTL Location of Juneau, Alaska
*** = Treaty of Hiroshima was the treaty that had ended Siberian War that was waged between the Russians and the Japanese which has started in 1943 following Japan switching sides.​
 
Last edited:
Admittedly I have thought that a lot of Central and Eastern Europeans would move into the former Confederacy following SGW.
Ummmm, Depends...I could see them prefering the more urbanize Old Union and people of more rural areas(some of Centra and Eastern but the remainder Mexicans in CSA plus Asian inmmigrants) could be a new core in the now open and more empty(thanks featherstone) south
 
Admittedly I have thought that a lot of Central and Eastern Europeans would move into the former Confederacy following SGW.

That’s very possible, although I tend to imagine most of them migrating toward the OTL Midwestern and Northeastern states. Perhaps a significant Central/Eastern European culture develops in the areas of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland.

I was just able to find actual Chinese Southerners that stood out from the rest the population and incorporate them with a unique story into the TL-191 Universe.

For how I imagine TL-191 American demographics right now, I see the former Canadian Pacific region, along with the states of Washington, Oregon, parts of California, (maybe Hawaii?) to have a significant Asian-American population, mostly from China and other similar regions trying to escape Japanese dominance. The former Confederacy has a significantly larger population of Mexican-descendent people.

One of my head canons is that the U.S. government tries to get as many immigrants as they can as part of the “Defreedomitization” into the Southern states, which varying degrees of success. It may get really awkward to try to convince people living in the former African colonies-now-newly-formed-nations to come to the former Confederacy, but I see it eventually happening, with full government support and protection.
 
Last edited:
I'd imagine that the US considering their long held status as enemies with Mexico would be highly against Mexican migration into US territory. Now any South American countries that have been long term allies of the US I can see happening. Though I can see plenty of immigration from Eastern Asia into the US in the old CS regions. Alongside land grants for Union soldiers that the US would try to encourage moving southward to much mixed success.

I'd also say Utah would be a particularly heavily migrated too region following the expulsion of Mormons to the Hawaiian islands.

On the other hand considering that the Confederacy was an internationally recognized independent country that had fought over four wars with the US in the span of 80 years. I think the place might go full on Balkans by the end of the century.
 
50th Anniversary Commemoration of the Fourth Pacific War:

A76D3F56-83B8-4211-B2C9-381E35466A45.png

Artist’s rendition of an immediate prewar Imperial Japanese Army soldier.

B66E0CE1-D284-4600-A6C3-0E7E5197EB15.jpeg

Russian soldiers engage the Japanese in Manchukuo, July 1968.

6D8504C1-72C1-4795-86F0-73F901FFF295.jpeg

US bomber over Tokyo, sometime in 1968.

6DE3264F-8D44-4E29-AFEB-DCE2E411C71A.jpeg

US soldiers, armed with M1955A1 rifles, parade through liberated Seoul, September 1968.

1AD5CA5A-8492-4008-9E99-C52D8DEACA3B.jpeg

Vietnamese forces rest outside the former Japanese consulate building in Saigon after its capture, September 1969.
 
Last edited:
If it did it would make Britain and the U.S. even more distrustful of each other.
Thats true but if ittl it was still a British ship is there a chance it would have been headed to a Confederate port with mostly British and Confederate passengers and only a handful of Americans?
Also suppose it was a German ship headed to New York which would be the analogous situation ittl in terms of political and cultural alliances....
 
Thats true but if ittl it was still a British ship is there a chance it would have been headed to a Confederate port with mostly British and Confederate passengers and only a handful of Americans?
Also suppose it was a German ship headed to New York which would be the analogous situation ittl in terms of political and cultural alliances....
I think that in peacetime trade, commerce, and travel would remain normal regardless of geopolitics. I remember Anne Colleton recollecting in one chapter from TGW how she would order fur coats from New York prewar.
 
I don't think there was real hatred between the nations prior to the Great War.

It seemed more like a very intense rivalry but willing to help each other in times of distress. Besides, if they didn't help, then that would set a precedence that other nations would do.
 
I don't think there was real hatred between the nations prior to the Great War.

It seemed more like a very intense rivalry but willing to help each other in times of distress. Besides, if they didn't help, then that would set a precedence that other nations would do.
I dont know about this.I think that the US had started to hate the British and French after the War of Secession as they played a key role in the Confederacy winning independence. But after the Second Mexican War this hatred really blossomed as the British and French along with the hated CSA played a key role in directly humiliating the US . In the aftermath you have Remembrance culture and the alliance with Germany. The Great War didnt remove that hatred but if anything it might have lessened it a little bit if only because the US and Germany won the war and took Britain and France down a peg or two. But circa 1912 would have been at the height of the dislike and mistrust between the US and Britain...
 
I dont know about this.I think that the US had started to hate the British and French after the War of Secession as they played a key role in the Confederacy winning independence. But after the Second Mexican War this hatred really blossomed as the British and French along with the hated CSA played a key role in directly humiliating the US . In the aftermath you have Remembrance culture and the alliance with Germany. The Great War didnt remove that hatred but if anything it might have lessened it a little bit if only because the US and Germany won the war and took Britain and France down a peg or two. But circa 1912 would have been at the height of the dislike and mistrust between the US and Britain...

It doesn't come off as hatred to me honestly. Sure there were those who hated the other side, but I feel like those were the minority and the ones in leadership positions.

For example, I don't think France and Germany hated each other OTL prior to WWI.
 
It doesn't come off as hatred to me honestly. Sure there were those who hated the other side, but I feel like those were the minority and the ones in leadership positions.

For example, I don't think France and Germany hated each other OTL prior to WWI.
Well there was that whole humiliating French defeat in the Franco-Prussian War that allowed Germany to become a nation. I understand that the Great War probably increased the hatred between France and Germany and in TL-191 more so on the side of the French since they lost the war. But the hatred was there long before the Great War as the two saw each other at best as bitter rivals but many saw each other as hated enemies and the Great War proved that beyond a doubt...
 
Well there was that whole humiliating French defeat in the Franco-Prussian War that allowed Germany to become a nation. I understand that the Great War probably increased the hatred between France and Germany and in TL-191 more so on the side of the French since they lost the war. But the hatred was there long before the Great War as the two saw each other at best as bitter rivals but many saw each other as hated enemies and the Great War proved that beyond a doubt...

I think it was more for the return of lost provinces than anything else that got France angry at Germany. Hatred is not something that these nations had. It is more akin to paypack for past humiliations.

Hating an enemy means that you wouldn't help them no matter what. If a British ship was sinking, hatred would mean that an US vessel would just allow it to sink. I doubt that something, or anything like that happened.

It's similar to the US and USSR were in the Cold War. Neither hated the other, but they did se each other as rivals vying for dominance.
 
I think it was more for the return of lost provinces than anything else that got France angry at Germany. Hatred is not something that these nations had. It is more akin to paypack for past humiliations.

Hating an enemy means that you wouldn't help them no matter what. If a British ship was sinking, hatred would mean that an US vessel would just allow it to sink. I doubt that something, or anything like that happened.

It's similar to the US and USSR were in the Cold War. Neither hated the other, but they did se each other as rivals vying for dominance.
The US and USSR actively planned to use nuclear weapons deliberately on each others civilian populations -to me that says some hatred was involved. I agree there are different levels of hatred and the people in leadership positions are usually more actively involved in such hatred than the average man on the street. There are different levels of hatred. The implacable hatred that existed between say Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia OTL is not the same type of hatred that existed between the Central and Entente powers in TL 191 however the two sides did have a degree of hatred that was based on distrust ,past humiliations and mutual rivalries . Such things dont happen in a vacuum however -they produce hatred to a certain extent..
 
Last edited:
The US and USSR actively planned to use nuclear weapons deliberately on each others civilian populations -to me that says some hatred was involved. I agree there are different levels of hatred and the people in leadership positions are usually more actively involved in such hatred than the average man on the street. There are different levels of hatred. The implacable hatred that existed between say Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia OTL is not the same type of hatred that existed between the Central and Entente powers in TL 191 however the two sides did have a degree of hatred that was based on distrust ,past humiliations and mutual rivalries . Such things dont happen in a vacuum however -they produce hatred to a certain extent..

I don't think that was hatred. Otherwise someone would have launched the buttons despite it all. That was more being pragmatic. Neither side wanted to launched nukes because they knew the would do the same.
 
Top