Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

Hey all. Long time no see!

I got question. How do you think US and CS military formations were organized during the Second Great War? As in, what constituted a division or a regiment or an armored division? In our timeline, the US Army organized its divisions in a very different way compared to the British and the Germans. How exactly do you think each side would organize their formations?
 
Here is what I have so far for Abner Dowling's ground forces in the 11th Army. After totaling the numbers, it looks like he should have at least ~22,600 men, possibly a little more given what additional units he may have cobbled together. They will mostly be composed of National Guardsmen from various states called up and federalized for military service along the border, with most coming from New Mexico and Sequoyah. While I believe motorized vehicles will be available for logistics and recon operations, horses will likely make up a larger share of the army. Cavalry was stated as being used, primarily for border patrol, recon, and skirmishing.

Here is what I have so far for US Forces in West Texas:

US 130th Infantry Division:
View attachment 560022

Attached Units:
View attachment 560023

This is not including Colonel Terry DeFrancis' USAAF air wing, which would likely augment the 11th Army's strength.
Are these symbols patches that the soldiers would wear?
 
The Forgotten Campaign: The True Story of the Alaskan Front during the SGW Part 7

A photo of the Japanese Aircraft Carrier Zuiho coming under intense air attack by dive bombers from the USS Hornet, circa September of 1942.

As the land battle in American Columbia had come to a stalemate, at sea, the naval battle was heating as both the Imperial Russian and Japanese began intensify their siege of the Queen Charlotte Islands. The Japanese would do this by strengthening their naval forces in the North Pacific with the addition of the battleships Fuso, Kongo, Mutsu, and Yamashiro the aircraft carriers Kaga, Akagi, and Shoho, two heavy cruisers, three light cruisers, and 5 destroyers. In addition, the Russians in their part would intensify the naval blockade by having their submarines laying mines around the island, with in conjunction with the G5 Torpedo Boats, would prove deadly to Yankee ships in the region. In addition, the Russian Air Force and Naval Air Arm would step up their air raids on the island by launching 3 raids per day as well as engaging Union shipping. In time, the Hecate Strait would become known as Iron Bottom Sound due to the amount of shipwrecks in the area (a majority of which were of Union supply ships that were sunk by the Russians.)

On the Union side of things, the Union Navy would begin reinforcing the defenses of the islands by building three additional airfields, and with them, a delivery of new P-39, P-38, and P-27 fighters, A-20 light bombers for anti-shipping duty, and PBY Catalinas for reconnaissance and anti-submarine roles. Task Force 36 would further reinforced in response to the arrival of more Japanese warships with the battleship Vermont, the aircraft carriers Benhomme Richard, Roanoke, Independence, and Princeton, two heavy cruisers, four light cruisers, 9 destroyers, and 15 escort destroyers. In resupplying the island and it's garrison, the Union forces would begin to use faster ships, such as destroyers and corvettes in the resupply role along with some new PT boats serving as their escorts to ward off attacks by the Russian motor torpedo boats.


In late August of 1942, the Japanese and Russian naval commanders had a meeting aboard the battleship Mutsu about their plans for eliminating the Union garrison on the Queen Charlotte Islands. After heavy considerations and talking, it was decided that their naval forces would engage the Yankee and hopefully incapacitate their carriers and battleships so that they would secure the sea. After that, they would cut off the sea supply line to the island, which they would then support and sea and airborne operation to take the islands. This operation would be dubbed as Operation: Thunder and was to take in mid September of 1942.

On September 13th, 1942, the Russo-Japanese combined naval force would depart from New Archangel toward the area south-east of the Queen Charlotte Islands. In response to this, Task Force 36 would depart from Puget Sound in Washington to deal with the enemy movements. These events would set the stage for the Second Battle of the Three Navies aka the Second Battle off the Queen Charlotte Islands.

A photograph of Admiral Spruance's flagship, the USS Constellation underway with the rest of TF 36 off of Vancouver Island.

A postwar painting of the Union light cruiser USS Boise making a suicidal attack on the Japanese battleship Haruna during the second night of the battle.

Russian heavy cruiser Pallada firing her guns at Union warships on the first day of the battle.

A explosion from a Japanese aerial bomb aboard the USS Bonhomme Richard.

A flotilla of Russian destroyers laying a smoke screen under intense fire during the eighth and final day of the battle.

For eight days at sea in an area 16 miles off the coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands, the Radius and Union forces would be engaged in a heavy naval battle. When the dust settled, the Union navy would suffer the loss of the carriers Bonhomme Richard and Princeton, the heavy cruisers Astoria, the light cruisers Boise, Sacramento, and Newark, 6 destroyers, and 62 aircraft. The carriers Hornet and Roanoke, the capital ships Constellation, Iowa, and Vermont, the heavy cruisers Northampton and Lansing, 2 light cruisers, and 8 destroyers damaged. The Japanese would suffer the loss of the carrier Zuiho and Shoho, the battleship Fuso, the heavy cruisers Chikuma and Kako, light cruiser Isuzu, and 7 destroyers, and 48 aircraft. The Russians would suffer the loss of the heavy cruiser Pallada, the light cruisers Oleg and Diana, 5 destroyers, and 12 aircraft. The Battle would turn out to be a victory for the Union forces due both the tactical mastermind of Admiral Spruance and due to poor communication and coordination between the Russian and Japanese Naval Forces.


A photograph taken of the aftermath of a Russian air raid on the Sandspit Naval Base in July of 1943. Which this particular air raid would be the last one of that the Russians would conduct on the island.

For months after the Second Battle of the Three Navies, the Russians would maintain their siege of the Queen Charlotte Islands all the way up until August of 1943 when the siege of the islands was finally lifted due the Russians fortunes of war changing following both the Betrayal of the Japanese earlier in the year and their catastrophes on the European Front.​
 
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The Forgotten Campaign: The True Story of the Alaskan Front during the SGW Part 2

A photo of a Union Army soldier manning a forward observation at the foot of Mount Shorty Stevenson, circa Spring of 1942.

Following the battles of Mount McLeod and Clements Lake in late December of 1941, the Russian offensive in American Columbia stalled and had dug in to prepare for a potential Union counter-attack. The Union forces would not launch any counter-attack, and no major land confrontations had occurred the next 4 months. However at sea, a few confrontations between Spruance's Task Force 36 and the elements of the Russian Pacific Fleet under Admiral Vitaly Fokin did occur. The first of which had occurred on December 7th, 1941 when the Union Task Force had attacked a Russian Convoy in the Gulf of Alaska that was carrying supplies to New Archangel for the Russian Ground Forces. The resulting 32 minute sea battle would prove to be inconclusive despite the Russians losing the destroyer Kapitan Belli and a single freighter badly damaged along with electrical system aboard the USS Brooklyn being knocked out. Days later on December 13th, the Russian cruisers Rynda and Izumrud would bombard a Union Coastal Defense Fort on the northern part of Graham Island, the raid would be somewhat successful as the Russians would damage some of the fortification's important structures and knocked one of the 12' batteries out of action.

A pre-war photograph of the Russian destroyer Kapitan Belli, which was a First Great War era Destroyer that was transferred to the Russian Pacific Fleet in 1938.

A photograph of the USS Brooklyn during the early days of the Second Great War, circa 1941. During the Battle, a shell from the Russian destroyer Rastoropny had struck the ship's center section, which consequently knocked out the cruiser's electrical system. As a result, the Brooklyn would spend a month at Seattle Washington undergoing repairs and was ultimately transferred to Task Force 38 stationed in the Sandwich Islands to replace the recently lost USS Topeka, which was a sistership to the Brooklyn.

The next naval confrontation would come on January 2nd, 1942, when the Russians would attempt an amphibious landing on the Queen Charlotte Islands with the cruisers Pallada, Rynda, and Izumrud, 9 destroyers, and 5 transport ships. However, the Union forces with a limited force of 8 PBY Catalina flying boats, 2 gunboats and the destroyers USS Little, Gregory, and McCall would make a determined resistance against the Russians to prevent it's capture. In the ensuing naval battle, the Union Navy would lose the USS Little and USS Gregory and 4 of the Catalinas to the Russians. In return, the Russians would lose two destroyers and the troop ship Stribog along with the cruiser Pallada and Izumrud, 3 destroyers, and two of the troop ships badly damaged.

The Russian Heavy Cruiser Rynda during the Battle of the Queen Charlotte Islands, circa 1942.

A PBY Catalina at Masset Inlet Naval Air Station on Graham Island after the Battle of the Queen Charlotte Islands.

Later that same month, the Imperial Russian Navy would start to deploy it's submarine flotilla along the Union coastal regions of Vancouver Island, Washington, Oregon, and California. Within the first month, the Russians would sink a total of 92,000 GRT worth of Union shipping.

The Imperial Russian Submarine S-51 leaving it's home base at Konstantinovsk, circa May of 1942. Kostantinovsk would go on to be the Russian Pacific Fleet's main submarine base in Alaska during the Second Great War and during the Frozen Conflict, would also become a major base for the US Navy's Submarine Fleet in the North Pacific.

Likewise, the Union Navy's forces in the North Pacific would also deploy their submarine force against the Russian and Japanese forces. These submarines would mainly patrol the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Alaska, which they would interdict with Russian shipping in the region. Around March of 1942, Task Force 36 would receive three new Fletcher class destroyers, the light aircraft carrier USS Fundy, and four escort destroyers of the Edsall class for Anti-Submarine duties.

The USS Sturgeon leaving it's base at Vancouver on to a war patrol in the Gulf of Alaska, circa 1942.

USS Fundy underway off the Alexander Archipelago, circa 1943.​
Good stuff. I find that I like the naval aspect of war more now as I read more stuff for it. So, this was a treat. Good to see the Alaskan Front fleshed out a bit, instead of it being a quiet sector.
 
Homemade and Improvised Weapons of the 3rd Mormon Uprising

There were three Mormon uprisings or revolts in Utah, the first during the Second Mexican-American War, 2nd during the First Great War and a final one during the Second Great War.
In all three clashes the Mormons were always in bad need procuring firearms and heavy weapons and went thru various means to obtain them, in most cases weapons were smuggled in Moron territory by the CSA, Great Britain, Russia, various Native American tribes and to a lesser extant Mexico and France.

Throughout all the uprising the Mormons also attempted to produce their own weapons this was of course very difficult because of the strong presence of US troops who always on the look out for such endeavors. The persisted in their attempts to produce weapons just as they had persisted in challenging the US.

Most homemade weapons made by the Mormons were very crude and some just downright dangerous to their own users but during the Second Great War the Mormons were able to produce some decent and more importantly reliable firearms.
One very innovate firearms make was John Browning who showed a true talent for the art of gun making, some of his guns were original designs and some were very good copies of mass produced firearms.

Below are some examples of captured homemade Mormon firearms.
No.1 is a Browning original handgun design, No.2 is believed to also be a Browning design and No.8 is a Browning copy of the Thompson sub-machine gun*.

None of these weapons were made in large enough numbers to have a lasting affect on the tide of battle.

Homemade-Impro-Guns.jpg


* An OTL Viet-Cong improvised Thompson made using parts from an M1 Carbine.
 
Here is something I made: a character model of Jacob Featherston.

I couldn't change his face or hairstyle in the manner that I wanted, but it's close enough.

2_2ceeee.jpg
 
Homemade and Improvised Weapons of the 3rd Mormon Uprising

There were three Mormon uprisings or revolts in Utah, the first during the Second Mexican-American War, 2nd during the First Great War and a final one during the Second Great War.
In all three clashes the Mormons were always in bad need procuring firearms and heavy weapons and went thru various means to obtain them, in most cases weapons were smuggled in Moron territory by the CSA, Great Britain, Russia, various Native American tribes and to a lesser extant Mexico and France.

Throughout all the uprising the Mormons also attempted to produce their own weapons this was of course very difficult because of the strong presence of US troops who always on the look out for such endeavors. The persisted in their attempts to produce weapons just as they had persisted in challenging the US.

Most homemade weapons made by the Mormons were very crude and some just downright dangerous to their own users but during the Second Great War the Mormons were able to produce some decent and more importantly reliable firearms.
One very innovate firearms make was John Browning who showed a true talent for the art of gun making, some of his guns were original designs and some were very good copies of mass produced firearms.

Below are some examples of captured homemade Mormon firearms.
No.1 is a Browning original handgun design, No.2 is believed to also be a Browning design and No.8 is a Browning copy of the Thompson sub-machine gun*.

None of these weapons were made in large enough numbers to have a lasting affect on the tide of battle.

View attachment 560088

* An OTL Viet-Cong improvised Thompson made using parts from an M1 Carbine.
Now, this is really good. It almost reminds me of how the Poles and Jews of Warsaw made their own firearms to resist the Nazi occupation of the city. The idea of John Browning existing in this timeline as a rebel making guns for the Mormons is pretty fascinating to me. If he wasn't butterflied away due to the changes in the timeline, I'd say that he would probably be making guns in a very clandestine way.
 
Now, this is really good. It almost reminds me of how the Poles and Jews of Warsaw made their own firearms to resist the Nazi occupation of the city. The idea of John Browning existing in this timeline as a rebel making guns for the Mormons is pretty fascinating to me. If he wasn't butterflied away due to the changes in the timeline, I'd say that he would probably be making guns in a very clandestine way.
Well maybe it isn't our OTL Browning but a close relative who shared his talent for gun making. :)
 
Homemade and Improvised Weapons of the 3rd Mormon Uprising

There were three Mormon uprisings or revolts in Utah, the first during the Second Mexican-American War, 2nd during the First Great War and a final one during the Second Great War.
In all three clashes the Mormons were always in bad need procuring firearms and heavy weapons and went thru various means to obtain them, in most cases weapons were smuggled in Moron territory by the CSA, Great Britain, Russia, various Native American tribes and to a lesser extant Mexico and France.

Throughout all the uprising the Mormons also attempted to produce their own weapons this was of course very difficult because of the strong presence of US troops who always on the look out for such endeavors. The persisted in their attempts to produce weapons just as they had persisted in challenging the US.

Most homemade weapons made by the Mormons were very crude and some just downright dangerous to their own users but during the Second Great War the Mormons were able to produce some decent and more importantly reliable firearms.
One very innovate firearms make was John Browning who showed a true talent for the art of gun making, some of his guns were original designs and some were very good copies of mass produced firearms.

Below are some examples of captured homemade Mormon firearms.
No.1 is a Browning original handgun design, No.2 is believed to also be a Browning design and No.8 is a Browning copy of the Thompson sub-machine gun*.

None of these weapons were made in large enough numbers to have a lasting affect on the tide of battle.

View attachment 560088

* An OTL Viet-Cong improvised Thompson made using parts from an M1 Carbine.
Despite my reservations as to the exaggerated behavior of the Mormon rebellions, I think it is plausible that Browning would have made weapons that were custom made for Mormons and not given it to the U.S.A. This means that the arsenal of U.S. guns in TL-191 during both Great Wars would have looked even more different.
 
Despite my reservations as to the exaggerated behavior of the Mormon rebellions, I think it is plausible that Browning would have made weapons that were custom made for Mormons and not given it to the U.S.A. This means that the arsenal of U.S. guns in TL-191 during both Great Wars would have looked even more different.
I agree.
 
Free Blacks of the Confederacy
*Since no one wanted to answer the questions I asked about Free Blacks in the CSA, I decided to write my own head canon ideas.


Photograph of a family of Free Blacks in Confederate Louisiana
This photograph is the cover photo of a netbranch (website) dedicated to researching African-American history in Louisiana.


Before the War of Secession, there was a sizable population of Blacks who had obtained their freedom from slavery or were born free living in both the Northern and Southern States. Most of this community was located in what would eventually become the Confederacy. During the 20 year existence of slavery in the CSA, there was a question of what to do with those Blacks who were not enslaved. Their existence was a hated contradiction from the point of view of White Confederates. Although the question of slavery was undisputed within the Confederate Constitution (until 1882), the fate of Free Blacks in the CSA was ultimately decided by the individual states. Exhaustive research has revealed that in some states, Free Blacks were often re-enslaved, if not outright massacred. Those that escaped becoming slaves or murdered often fled to either the Indian Territory of Sequoyah or to the United States. Some Native Americans were sympathetic to the plight of Black Confederates and allowed them to live among their communities, while others turned them over to Confederate authorities in violation of an "Indian-only" homeland between the natives and the Confederate government. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was still active until near the end of President Lincoln's term and many were given back to the CSA. Even when the act was abolished, Black refugees trying to escape the CSA would often be shot, captured, and returned to their point of origin with the help of U.S. authorities. There were some exceptions, however. Abolitionists (Black and White) and those that sympathized with Black slaves would often help them by giving them shelter and helping them obtain U.S. citizenship. This secret network of transporting slaves toward freedom was called the Underground Railroad and would be active until the 1880's, although some resemblance of the activity continued on during and after every war the U.S. and Confederacy fought against each other.

Surprisingly, it was discovered that in some counties and some states in the Confederacy, the Free Black community was left alone, albeit tightly regulated by local laws. Even after slavery was abolished in the CSA and still lacked full citizenship rights, Black who were descended from these free communities were able to obtain wealth, high status and even surnames, even though Whites resented it and would sometimes initiate race riots to destroy Black Prosperity. The state that offered the most positive opportunities for Blacks was Cuba. Despite existing official laws that enforced segregation and limited choices for Blacks, they were often not enforced. One of the most well-known communities of well-to-do Blacks in the C.S. mainland existed in Louisiana, especially in New Orleans.

When Featherston achieved the presidency, Governor of Louisiana Huey Long heavily resisted against the Freedomite government. Regardless of his original intentions, Long was helpful toward the Black community and tried to prevent their deportation to the camps. Unfortunately, once Long was assassinated by Featherston's Confederacy, Black Confederates of all types were in danger of being used as prison labor and/or massacred without protection. One of the darkest events during the early years of Featherston's Confederacy's history was the complete destruction of cities and neighborhoods that contained Blacks who were citizens or descended from Free Black families. Despite never experiencing direct warfare in the Deep South, states such as Lousiana, Mississippi, and Alabama saw a titanic and destructive struggle between the Freedomites and Blacks who fought back to prevent themselves from being murdered. A famous anti-war movie, titled Watch and Learn, was made in 1985 from a biracial film director Enoch Clemens which portrayed the suffering of a community of Black Confederates descended from Free Blacks during the first term of Featherton's presidency. The film was largely based on Clemens' own experiences as a survivor from the Freedomites when they destroyed his home and shot his entire family. Despite being labeled a SGW film, the setting technically takes place years before the start of Operation Blackbeard.


Photograph of St. Augustine Church in New Orleans, ca. early 20th Century
Established in 1841 by Free Blacks, the church was the oldest African American Catholic church established in the United States. By the late 1930's, Featherston had already developed an anti-Catholic prejudice and during a roundup of Blacks in New Orleans, he ordered the church to be filled with as much Blacks and their allies as possible. Since the church was made of stone and could not be burned down, explosives were attached to it and it was demolished, killing everyone inside. A similar scene in reference to this event appeared in the movie Watch and Learn.

Sources:
1) https://lib.lsu.edu/sites/all/files/sc/fpoc/history.html
2) https://64parishes.org/entry/free-people-of-color
3) https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-ushistory1os2xmaster/chapter/african-americans-in-the-antebellum-united-states/
4) https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african-american-odyssey/free-blacks-in-the-antebellum-period.html
5) https://www.amazon.com/North-Carolinas-People-Color-1715-1885/dp/080717176X
6) https://www.villagevoice.com/2019/12/04/escape-from-blackness-once-upon-a-time-in-creole-america/
7) https://africandiasporaphd.com/2017/09/07/digital-free-people-of-color-in-louisiana/
8) https://web.archive.org/web/20160828205601/http://www.lemuseedefpc.com/footsteps/
9) https://news.blogs.lib.lsu.edu/2015/04/15/free_people_of_color_louisiana/
10) https://books.google.com/books?id=mxCKaX-SUJMC&pg=PA215&lpg=PA215&dq=dr+henry+lewis+bailey+black+harvard&source=bl&ots=BXJ1LBbxTE&sig=ACfU3U3bP_lFjrv9jPWvjFUXC20t1N3DGg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjgl8mB_J_qAhUKHc0KHbsEDlgQ6AEwAXoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=dr henry lewis bailey black harvard&f=false
11) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Augustine_Church_(New_Orleans)
12) https://nolahistoryguy.com/2018/08/st-augustine-catholic-church-in-the-treme-podcast/
13) Watch and Learn is a reference to the real-life movie
Come and See
 
Well maybe it isn't our OTL Browning but a close relative who shared his talent for gun making. :)
Browning guns are stated to be in use by the USA during both Great Wars. so if nothing else the USA is using his guns. They distinctly mention the 1911 and the BAR at different points in the books.
 
Browning guns are stated to be in use by the USA during both Great Wars. so if nothing else the USA is using his guns. They distinctly mention the 1911 and the BAR at different points in the books.
Yeah I think that was lazy writing on Turtledove's part but one could also make the argument that the 1911 mentioned in the books is just a pistol that was adopted in 1911 and not necessarily the Browning designed 45 handgun of OTL and the "B" in BAR could stand for Burns Automatic Rifle, you know the Famous Burns "Excellent Firearms Company" of Springfield?
OK just having a laugh there but a lot of things mentioned in TL-191 shouldn't be there.
 
Except for a few scenes, I can't see Christoff Waltz pulling off being that evil. I could actually see Leonardo DiCaprio pulling it off though, or maybe a young Jack Nicholson.
(you say this even as the reference photo shows Waltz in an SS uniform as Hans Landa, one of the best movie Villains of the last 10 years XD)

Honestly, i can't really see Leo as Featherston: he's decribed as thin and a bit gaunt in the books, and even as an adult Leo is pretty round-faced. I could see Nicholson pulling off Clarence Potter, though.
 
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