Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

A General History of the Second Mexican Empire in TL-191
*This was going to be its own thread under a different title, but I decided that since it differed a lot from Dr. Turtledove's version, it should be considered a type of fanon. Perhaps someone else can make a thread that contains a more accurate version of TL-191 Mexico from the books. (Ex. There is no Maximilian II, Maximilian III, Francisco Jose or Francisco Jose II in this version here)

The Imperial Restoration under Hapsburg-Iturbide
Prior to the victory of the Confederacy over the Union on November 4th, 1862, during the War of Secession, Mexico was dealing with its own war. More specifically, they were fighting a second Franco-Mexican war that began on December 8th, 1861. When Mexico could not pay its debts to European creditors, Emperor Napoleon III of France decided to take advantage of the weakened nation and exert French influence by installing a monarchy. Mexico was initially an empire ruled by Agustín de Iturbide after gaining independence from Spain on September 28th, 1821 until it became a republic two years later. The idea of Mexico becoming a monarchy again began as early as 1838, when an essay appeared that was written by José María Gutiérrez de Estrada and it argued for the idea of a European monarch ruling Mexico.


Entrance of the French Expeditionary Corps into Mexico on 10 June 1863, Jean-Adolphe Beaucé, 1868​

On July 10th, 1863, the Second Mexican Empire was proclaimed, after the French captured Mexico City a month earlier, but it still lacked a ruler. The regency government sent a delegation of Mexican conservatives to Miramare Castle in Trieste and offered Maximilian von Hapsburg of Austria the Imperial Crown of Mexico on October 3, 1863. After being convinced by Napoleon III to accept the crown, Maximilian claimed that he would only do it if there was a plebiscite that ruled in his favor. A fraudulent plebiscite was done on December 4th, 1863 and Maximilian formally accepted the throne on April 10th, 1864 after the Treaty of Miramar was signed.


The Offering of the Mexican Crown by a Mexican delegation, Cesare Dell’Acqua, 1867
Along with his wife, Charlotte of Belgium, the eldest daughter of Leopold I of Belgium, Maximilian arrived at Veracruz on May 29, 1864 and settled in Chapultepec Castle. More than a year later on September 16th, 1865, Maximilian adopted as his heirs the grandsons of the first Mexican Emperor from the House of Iturbide, Agustín and Salvador. However, their adoptions were more of a ruse to convince the Hapsburgs in Austria-Hungary to give him a younger heir since he had none of his own. It was rumored that either him or Charlotte couldn’t have children. When the imperial couple first arrived in Mexico, Maximilian and his wife were shocked at the social conditions of their new empire. Contrary to the expectations of his Conservative allies, Maximilian’s earliest actions were to help out the peasant class of Mexico. One of Maximilian's first acts as Emperor was to restrict working hours and abolish child labor. He cancelled all debts for peasants over 10 pesos, restored communal property and forbade all forms of corporal punishment. He also broke the monopoly of the Hacienda stores and decreed that peons could no longer be bought and sold for the price of their debt. Maximilian would also support liberal policies, such as land reforms, religious freedom, and extending the right to vote.


Departure of Maximilian and Carlota from Trieste, Cesare Dell'Acqua, 1865
The Confederate States were among the first countries that recognized the empire and quickly established diplomatic relations and vice-versa. The United States viewed the empire as a violation of the Monroe Doctrine, but could not enforce it now that it had the support of Britain, France, the CSA, and even Russia. In-fighting still occurred between the Mexican Republican Liberals and the Mexican Monarchist Conservatives. The United States did send weapons to the Liberals on the remaining U.S.-Mexico border in order to help the rebels fight against the Imperial government. Confederate and French support to Maximilian stabilized his rule over the empire. Before the French withdrew its own forces from Mexico just before the start of the Franco-Prussian War, a deal was made between the Confederates and French that both will be involved in keeping Maximilian in power.

Benito Juárez continued to fight against the empire, but it was not enough to win against a Franco-Confederate backed Mexico. Juárez was eventually captured in 1867 and brought on trial for crimes against the empire. During Juárez's imprisonment, Maximilian visited him several times to talk. Maximilian wanted to spare Juárez and give him the position of prime minister since they both shared Liberal viewpoints for the future of Mexico, but he refused his offers. Despite continued pleas from Maximilian to Juárez, the Conservatives wanted to execute Juárez and formally sentenced him to death by firing squad on June 19th, 1867. His last words were: ¡Viva México! ¡Viva la independencia! ¡Viva la república! (Long Live Mexico! Long Live the Independence! Long Live the Republic!). The Monroe Doctrine was finally dead; it suffered a mortal wound when the Confederates received diplomatic and economic support from Britain and France in 1862 and its misery ended in 1867 with the death of Juárez.


Death Mask of Benito Juárez
Maximilianato, the Historical Period of Emperor Maximilian of Mexico (1864-1879 or 1881)


Su Majestad Imperial, Maximiliano de México

After securing his rule at the end of the 1860’s/early 1870’s, Maximilian enjoyed great popularity with the ordinary people of Mexico. He tried his best to assimilate himself into the local culture. He was not the authoritarian ruler that many feared he would be. Instead, he was more interested in his botanical hobbies than ruling the nation as an autocrat. In fact, his first trip outside of the Mexican empire was to the Brazilian empire, where, besides meeting with Dom Pedro II, he collected several plants for his study.

When Napoleon III was deposed from power in 1872 after the defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian War, Maximilian took advantage of the situation and introduced more expensive reforms to the empire, despite much protests from the Conservatives. To some Liberals that remained within the empire, however, he was still a usurper who should not even be in Mexico, even if he was doing a lot of good to the Mexican people. The Third French Republic attempted to continue to view Mexico as another colony under French control but Maximilian refused to follow along and fiercely asserted that his empire be independent. The Confederacy would help France and Mexico develop good diplomatic relations. Eventually, the French would leave a strong cultural influence in Mexico. Maximilian did encourage immigration from other nations, especially Austrian and German communities, but he insisted that Mexico is for those who only wished to be Mexican first. While rumors of coup attempts circled around the Imperial government, one was nearly successful in removing Maximilian from power in 1876. José Díaz Mori, a supporter of Juárez during the Second Franco-Mexican War, created plans for a putsch on January 10th of that same year. On May 5th, 1876, he attempted to abolish the empire and restore the republic but failed and was defeated by imperial forces in October 16th, 1876 during the Battle of Tecoac.


Prince-Regent Salvador of Mexico ( June 29th, 1879--April 2nd, 1881)

On June 29, days before his 47th Birthday, Maximilian died of malaria. Although his death at a young age shocked Mexico and the world, he gained for himself the respect and admiration of European royalty and from the Mexican people. A temporary crisis of succession occurred due to the Hapsburgs never giving Maximilian the heir he wanted, but it was eventually resolved with Salvador becoming prince-regent of the empire until Agustin turned 18 in on April 2, 1881. One of the few things that Salvador did during his regency was the reinstitution of Mexico’s Pre-1865 territorial divisions. Instead of being divided into 50 departments, Mexico would now be divided into 25 states.

Copy_39457.jpg

Map of Mexico (1865-1880)​

Agustinato (1881-1925)


Su Majestad Imperial, Agustín III de México

Agustín III, as he was now known after his coronation, reversed some of the reforms that his adoptive father made in order to gain more support from the Conservatives. These actions made him more unpopular to the underground Liberal resistance. Issues such as continuing land reform, reducing poverty, improving infrastructure and the securing the rights of indigenous communities began to fail during his reign. Since the 1870’s, the empire had grown more into debt and was in desperate need of cash to pay off their European creditors. The Confederate government, wanting access to the Pacific Ocean, offered the empire a sale of C$3,000,000 for some of their northern land: the states of Sonora and Chihuahua and a land lease giving the Confederacy travel access through the Baja California peninsula. Despite the positive legality of the purchase, the United States refused to allow the Confederates to obtain more land. At first, they offered Mexico more money than the Confederates’ price, but the Mexican government refused to sell the USA more land due to negative reception of previous land sales in 1848 and 1854. Eventually, the USA and CSA went to war over the sale in 1881. Later, the British would join in the war alongside the CSA. There was also French support, albeit limited in the form of naval engagements. This was due to France’s recovering state at the time after losing against the Prussians in the Franco-Prussian War. There were also economic recessions that France and other European nations were experiencing at the time. During the latter half of the war’s length, Mexico would join in the war and be involved in a series of battles against Fort Yuma, San Diego, Santa Ana, and Los Angeles. Even though most of these battles ended in Mexican victory, the Americans put up a strong defense and most of the casualties were from Mexican soldiers, who were often underequipped and had less advanced weaponry.


Imperial Mexican Soldiers fighting against U.S. Soldiers near Fort Yuma, N.M. Territory.
After the United States was defeated in 1882, Agustín III experienced mixed praise from the people. On the one hand, he chose an unpopular decision to sell more Mexican land to a foreign nation, but on the other, the purchase was done without force and the War of 1881, as it was sometimes called, helped Mexico gained a sense of national pride in belonging to an alliance of nations that won against the United States. It was a small revenge against the United States from the war that occurred between both nations in 1846-1848.

In 1884, another putsch occurred under the influence of Manuel González, a one-armed former general who fought during the Second Franco-Mexican War and was a supporter of José Díaz Mori. Despite the expectations from the USA that the monarchy would fall, the coup did not succeed and the monarchy continued on. During the remaining years of the 19th-Century, Mexico was interested in flexing its power into the Central American region. Sometime in the reign of Maximilian, the Mexican emperor offered the governments of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica the opportunity to re-join Mexico. All of them refused to be annexed and Maximilian dropped the subject, never to propose it again. Agustín III, however, wanted to increase the size of his empire and began to make plans to meddle in the affairs of the Central American nations. Mexico noticed that under Justo Rufino Barrios in Guatemala, the political rights of the Catholic Church were being diminished. He was also attempting to re-form a Central American Union and went to war with El Salvador to force it to join. Fearing a strong Central America and abhorring the mistreatment of the Catholic clergy from the Barrios government, a war nearly occurred between Mexico and Guatemala until the Confederacy intervened. With the convenient death of Barrios in 1885, the CSA was able to convince Mexico to abandon plans for annexation and, instead, allow Guatemala and El Salvador to be economically dependent via Mexican-owned fruit/sugar corporations. The CSA would do the same economic plans toward Honduras and Nicaragua. Only Costa Rica would be the most stable and independent Central American nation that would generally side with the USA.

Logo for the Valentine Bros., an Confederate corporation made by a group of Italian-Confederate siblings that traded bananas from Latin America to the rest of the world

The World At War (1914-1917)

NorthAmerica_Great War in TL_191.jpg

Map of North America during the First Great War, 1914-1917 (Red=Entente Powers, Blue=Central Powers, White=Neutral)
At the start of the First Great War in 1914, Mexico had signed a mutual-assistance treaty with the Confederacy. While not officially a member of the Entente Powers, it was a co-belligerent against the only major nation in North America that was part of the Central Powers: the USA. The Confederacy and Mexico declared war against them in August 1914. Mexican troops would cross into Sonora and Chihuahua and joined their Confederate allies fighting the Americans in New Mexico and in some parts of western Texas. In Baja California, the Mexican Army was in a defensive position most of the time and prevented the U.S. army from conquering it. When the war ended in 1917, the Mexican government was shocked that they had lost another war against the United States. Despite not losing any land to the victors, its morale was shattered and the people of Mexico were disillusioned in fighting a war that did not bring them neither glory or any financial or territorial compensation. Before the war began, Mexico was suffering from social inequality and disproportionate wealth imbalance. It was believed that a war against a historical enemy would help alleviate the problems the Mexican people faced. However, its defeat in the First Great War would be one of the reasons the Mexican Civil War of 1920 occurred.

The Mexican Civil War (1920-1930)

Collage of the Mexican Civil War

The Mexican Civil War was largely made up of two factions: The Imperialists and Republicans. The latter group were organized by a loose confederation of leaders who had different visions for Mexico, some of which were contradictory, but they were united under their hatred of the Imperial government. Some of the major individuals involved against the Imperialists were: Madero, Magón, Carranza, and Zapata. While the USA was able to sent weapons to the Republicans, the Confederate government suffered too much from war reparations to help out the Imperialists. However, the Confederate Freedom Party would unofficially encourage its members, especially veterans from the FGW, to go to Mexico and use their experience to help out the Imperialist government. Eventually, to the surprise of many, the Imperialist won. Most historians generally agree that there were three main reasons why they won: 1) Additional help from former Confederate soldiers, which were a combination of CFP members and non-CFP members. 2) No war reparations imposed on Mexico from the USA. Had there been any reparations, there would have been a greater pressure to get rid of the Imperial government. In addition, the cancelling of reparations on the CSA allowed the Confederate government to send out a minimal amount of aid to the Mexican government. 3) The death of Agustín III in 1925 allowed Princess María Josepha Sophia de Iturbide to become Empress of Mexico and negotiate with the leaders of the Republican forces and make reforms to the empire. The reforms were not numerous, but they were helpful to dissuade some rebel leaders to stop fighting. The more radical ones vowed to continue fighting and eventually destroy the monarchy.

The World At War, Again (1941-1944)

Su Majestad Imperial, María de México

When the Second Great War began in 1941, Empress María did not want the empire to go to war. However, the Mexican government’s alliance with Featherston’s Confederacy and the risk of the Republican rebels emerging again meant that she had very little choice in the matter. Without the economic support of the Confederacy, Mexico was all on its own. Since her reign began, she had learned what most of the government knew for decades: Despite what their laws may say on paper, in practice, Mexico was still dependent on foreign powers. Just like in the last war, Mexico declared war against the USA, but played a largely defensive role. Several times, Mexico was compelled to send out its soldiers for “peace-keeping roles” within the Confederacy, but everyone knew that most of them would go to battle against the Americans. The immigration of Mexico’s poorest people to the CSA for cheap labor reduced the likelihood of the Mexican lower class to engage in anti-imperialist activities. However, their large presence in the Confederacy raised questions within the USA and Mexico as to the status of the CSA's Black population. The loss of Baja California, the revelation of the mass murder of Black Confederates by Featherston’s Confederacy, and the USA winning against the CSA compelled the Imperial government to sue for peace in 1944, a few months before the war ended.

Although an enemy during the SGW, the USA decided not to deal with Mexico and focused on the conquered CSA, instead. Eventually, both nations decided that it was time to reconcile after nearly a century of bad blood between them. Beginning in 1947 with the help of the President of the Irish Republic, a new age of peace and friendship blossomed between the USA and the Empire of Mexico. While there were still some unsolved issues, such as the fate of Baja California, Sonora and Chihuahua; the fate of Central America’s former Confederate businesses, the hunting of former Confederate Freedom Party members, and the Republican rebels, both nations pledged to be good neighbors from now until the end of time.

In 1947, Vice-President Harry Truman became the first U.S. Executive Branch politician to ever visit Mexico City. Unexpectedly, Mr. Truman makes an out-of-the-way stop at the Chapultepec Monument. Here he pays a simple tribute to the memory of Mexican youths who died 100 years ago defending their nation's capital against an American army. All of Mexico was tremendously moved by this act. Truman brought to Mexico a promise: "...to observe the doctrine of non-intervention. What it means is that a strong nation does not have a right to impose its will by reason of its strength upon a weaker nation."
Educational Sources:
http://www.eumed.net/rev/tecsistecatl/n14/division-territorial-mexico.pdf
http://www.historicas.unam.mx/moderna/ehmc/ehmc12/153.html
http://www.agn.gob.mx/menuprincipal/difusion/textos/pdf/DiarioImperio13mar1865.pdf
http://cdigital.dgb.uanl.mx/la/1020005252/1020005252_MA.PDF
http://cdigital.dgb.uanl.mx/la/1080045869/1080045869_017.pdf
https://www.raremaps.com/gallery/detail/39457/carta-general-del-imperio-mexicano-formada-y-corregida-con-decaen-debray
https://bookpalace.com/acatalog/info_EmbletonGBanditsLL.html
http://www.museobicentenario.mx/el-museo-y-su-historia/06-segundo-imperio/
http://sin-perdon.yolasite.com/picture-gallery-v.php
https://archive.org/details/historyofmexico05banc/page/224/mode/2up
https://www.dorotheum.com/en/l/439909/
https://www.inehrm.gob.mx/recursos/Libros/Interiores_Maximiliano.pdf
https://relatosehistorias.mx/numero-vigente/de-cuando-ciudad-de-mexico-no-tuvo-presidente-ni-emperador-1863-1864
An Explanation to what the Valentine Bros. are supposed to reference.

In-Universe ideas I made:
https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/photos-from-featherstons-confederacy-tl-191.185493/page-191#post-19158761
https://www.alternatehistory.com/forum/threads/photos-from-featherstons-confederacy-tl-191.185493/page-193#post-19513080
 
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Now for some Post-War images of the Union (now US) Military


US Army Soldiers with an M1949 Recoilless Rifle during a Military Exercise in New Mexico, circa 1959.

A US Army AA crew manning a 40mm Bofors AA gun with a Radar Truck in the background, somewhere on the Sandwhich Islands, circa 1956.

A US Army mortarman wearing an experimental desert camouflage uniform, circa 1982.

US Marines on a landing craft at Midway Atoll, circa 1963.

US Army soldiers during tactical maneuvers in Northern Dakota, circa 1981.

Soldiers of the California National Guard during a firing exercise using the M1950 General Purpose Machine-Gun (which was a copy of the German MG-42), circa 1975.

Members of the USMC Sandwich Island Garrison practicing on with a 60mm M1958 Light Mortar, circa 1960.
unnamed.jpg

A US Army soldier in full winter gear with his Springfield M1974 Assault Carbine, somewhere in Alyaska*, circa 1979.

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* = Following the collapse of the Russian Empire in the late 1940s, Alyaska would become an independent nation in 1948. In 1956, with the fear of Japanese Imperial Expansion in the North Pacific, the Tsardom of Alyaska would form a defense pact with the United States.

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The source to many of the images I have gathered for this post.​
 
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My own interpretations of how these inventors and inventors came to be in TL-191


Hiram Maxim, born in 1840 in the state of Maine, was an inventor who moved to England during the 1880's. He invented the Maxim gun, the first recoil-operated machine gun at the time and used extensively by the British army. The War of 1881 nearly prevented him from immigrating to Europe and creating his famous invention.


John Garand was a Quebecois engineer who created the Garand rifle in 1936. Born in Canadian Quebec in St. Remic in 1888, he and his family moved to Connecticut in 1899. He found employment as an adult in Rhode Island and New York. Due to his lack of American citizenship, he was denied conscription into the U.S. army and never served during the First Great War. However, his fascination with guns never left him. He moved to the newly-formed Republic of Quebec in 1920 and became a Quebecois citizen. During the 1930's, Garand would create a semi-automatic rifle that would rival the American Springfield bolt-action rifle. During the middle of the Second Great War, the Garand rifle would be used by the U.S. army with some slight modifications.


Confederate Army officer John T. Thompson with a final prototype of his "Thompson Machine Gun".

A veteran of the Second Mexican War, his exposure to battlefields during the First Great War as a Brigadier-General inspired him to create a rifle-type weapon that could automatically fire bullets. His retirement from the army allowed him to invent prototypes for his "Tommy Gun". Unfortunately, the economic crisis of the Confederacy during the 1920's and prohibitions of re-arming prevented him from getting funding. During Featherston's rise to power, Thompson was a staunch Whig who would oppose the Confederate Freedom Party. After Featherston gained power in 1934, Thompson would be imprisoned after refusing an offer to work for Featherston's Confederacy and die in 1940. His work would be used by the Confederate Government and heavily modified into the TAR, otherwise known as the "Tredegar Automatic Rifle".
 
It was mentioned in the book The Grapple that the Thompson submachine gun was used by the U.S. Army. It was used by one of Armstrong Grimes men in his new unit.
 
I would think that after the dissolution of the CSA, Washington would return to being the Capital of the United States. The only reason why Philadelphia was used was because it was further from the US-CS border, and it was used up until the beginning of GW1
That’s what I assume would happen also. I can see the government making a big show of it that the return to D.C. symbolizes the two countries finally being reunited.
 

A US Army EOD working on defusing a unexploded bomb from the SGW in Central Virginia, circa 1998.

A US Navy EOD working on a washed up SGW era Naval Mine along the coast of Nova Scotia, circa 2017.

Unexploded artillery shells and mortars that were dug up from a field in Eastern Pennsylvania, circa 2015.

An M2 "Custer" chassis that was dug up during road construction in Eastern Ohio, circa 2019.

A photo of a Confederate M1943 80mm Anti-Barrel Gun that was discovered in the forests of the Appalachian Foothills in Tennessee, circa 2009.
 
It was mentioned in the book The Grapple that the Thompson submachine gun was used by the U.S. Army. It was used by one of Armstrong Grimes men in his new unit.
Maybe Harry Turtledove made a research error, as Thompson was born in a Southern state. Although he could have easily moved North...…………...
 
Maybe Harry Turtledove made a research error, as Thompson was born in a Southern state. Although he could have easily moved North...…………...
Kentucky was one of those states that sided with the USA during the Civil War, so it is possible that after the end of the war of secession, people who were loyal to the US left
 
Maybe Harry Turtledove made a research error, as Thompson was born in a Southern state. Although he could have easily moved North...…………...
More than likely, given all the other minor and major errors Dr. Turtledove made in the books. However, it is plausible for him to settle down in Post-1917 Kentucky as a U.S. citizen and have his gun be used by the U.S. army.
 
More than likely, given all the other minor and major errors Dr. Turtledove made in the books. However, it is plausible for him to settle down in Post-1917 Kentucky as a U.S. citizen and have his gun be used by the U.S. army.
I wasn't talking about after the Great War where Thompson moved. I was talking about after his family moved out of Kentucky after it joined the CSA after they won their independence.
 
Neo Featherstonist Confederate separatist and genocide denier Matthew Heimbach, currently wanted by both America and the Mitteleuropa Mittelafrika alliance, allegedly hiding Russia.
6D8AF98D-22E6-4101-883E-EFE504ACDF54.jpeg
 
The Battle of Greenland


A photo of Union troops offloading from a troopship at the port of Nuuk, circa 1942.

British soldiers landing at the town of Tasiilaq, circa 1942.

Following the British takeover of the Danish colonies of the Faroe Islands and Iceland, the US High Command were concerned that the British will certainly try and take the Danish colony of Greenland, which they fear that the British would use as a base to attack Union warships off the coast of Labrador and potentially try to invade Union controlled Canada. In early May of 1942, the Union Naval High Command under Earnest J. King would devise Operation North Star, which was a plan for the Union Military to move in and to occupy Greenland in order to prevent a potential British occupation, but it was also to put pressure on the British Garrison on Iceland. The operation called for the initial forces to be comprised of elements two U.S. Army Infantry divisions, a Marine division, a detachment of the US Navy Seabees (who were to build important infrastructure on Greenland), and also a Paratroop brigade. The ad hoc Naval Unit that was formed to transport them there was Task Force 43 which was commanded by Rear Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan. TF 43 would consist of Callaghan's flagship, the USS Los Angeles, the light cruisers USS Duluth, Helena, and Marblehead, 12 destroyers, 7 troopships, and three LSTs. As for the ground forces, most of them were pulled from the garrisons of the territories of Labrador and Newfoundland, with them being backed with some 75mm pack howitzers, an anti-aircraft detachment with 10 40mm AA guns, and 6 M2A4 light barrels. As for the paratroops, the plan was is that they were to dropped into Greenland by C46 Commando transports days before the arrival of the Task Force 43. Around the same time as the Union forces were forming their plan, the British were also putting together their operation in Greenland, which was codenamed as Operation Doomsday. Their landing force consisted of the heavy cruisers HMS York and HMS Dorsetshire, the light cruisers Arethusa, Orion, Emerald, and Dido, 10 destroyers, and 9 troopships. The landing force had two regular Infantry battalions, elements of the Grenadier Guards, No. 4 Commando, and elements of the Royal Marines alongside an Anti-Aircraft company and some Royal Engineers for support.

USS Duluth (CL-60) preparing to set sail with TF 43 from Cartwright Naval Base in Labrador to Greenland, circa May of 1942.

On May 24th, 1942, Task Force 43 would set sail from Cartwright to land the ground troops on Greenland, at the same time, the aircraft that were to transport the paratroops had took off from their airbases in Labrador. However there only 6 C46 Commandos available for their disposal, and so the remainder of the paratroops either arrived aboard C47s or on C79s (which were Ju-52s in Union service.) The latter aircraft had ran out of fuel when they had reached the Greenland coast, and so had to crash land.

A photograph of several Union paratroopers on the outskirts of Nanortalik after landing, note a C79 in the background preparing to crash land.

The day after the first Union forces landed in Greenland, the British forces unit Force L had arrived in Greenland, first landing at Tasiilaq on the 24th, then at Prins Christianssund on the 25th, and a detachment of the Royal Marines with the destroyer HMS Isis had attempted at landing at Nanortalik on the same day. But were driven off by the Union paratroops and local militia, and a day later, the elements of Task Force 43 had reached that village, dropping an engineer detachment with an infantry company. On that same day, the main force would arrive on the western coast of Greenland, notably offloading troops at Nuuk and Paamiut. With a few weeks, several clashes between the British and the allied Union-Danish forces had occured, notably at Ikeq Island, where the 5th Marine Company clashed with No. 4 Commando, which the resulting firefight had left 8 Union and 9 British dead.

The aftermath of a skirmish that occurred on July 16th, 1942, which the British would defeat a US Army platoon at the settlement of Tasiusaq. Which they had killed 14 men and captured the rest while only suffering 16 dead and 11 wounded.

A postwar war painting about the Raid on Nanortalik, which had occurred on September 11th, 1942. The raid was conducted by the Royal Navy as an attempt to capture the Union base, which saw the British sinking two destroyers and four cargo ships while damaging the cruisers Los Angeles (which a shell from the HMS Dido had killed Admiral Callaghan) and Helena and another destroyer, in return, the British would only loose the destroyer HMS Kelly.

The Battle of Greenland would last until August of 1943 when the Union Forces captured the settlement of Tasiilaq from the British after a week long siege. This battle would see the loss of 1,632 men dead, 2,201 wounded, and 104 missing for the Union along with 4 destroyers, 2 troopships, and 7 cargo ships sunk, 14 fighters, 15 cargo planes, and 2 bombers lost. The British would have 2,122 men killed, 2,891 wounded, and 82 missing along with 5 destroyers, 3 cargo ships, a submarine, and the cruiser HMS Orion sunk, and 13 fighters and 7 bombers shot down. Though this campaign has been badly overlooked by other battles during the war, none the less, this would be the only time other than the Battles of Bermuda, where the Union troops had come face to face with British soldiers during the Second Great War.​
 
The Story of the 1st Honor Guards Motorized Divison of the President Jacob Featherston
Nice addition. I liked how you added a synonym for the "Confederate helmet" ITTL as a "Sydenham Helmet". Good reference to the inventor of the M1 Helmet in OTL. I'm surprised there isn't a Wikipedia article on the guy!

The Battle of Oak Alley Plantation
Good pictures and great story!

Story of the Donner Brigade

I bet all of you reading this knows what OTL Group that I am basing this off of.​
I... actually don't know of the OTL group. Who is it? Is it the SS?

Some graphics that I had made for TL-191



A catalog page from Shotgun News made in 2002.
Really good! I wished you would have added the other flag backgrounds on the other guns within their own columns, except for the former Confederacy, for obvious reasons.

Confederate Admirals during the Second Great War
I don't know much about Navy stuff, but it's nice to hear about this gap being filled in TL-191.

the Singer Building in New York City being repaired after being partially destroyed during a confederate air raid in New York City in 1944, during the raid a confederate bomber plane dropped a bomb directly at the spire, blowing up the spire and making the remaining upper floors collapse and fall in to the streets below (crushing 2 american barrels). reducing the size of the former skyscraper from 612 feet to only 413 feet. The tower blazed through out the night but in the morning it was no longer the 7th tallest building in the world any more, even the charred skeleton of the Philadelphia city hall was taller. Although Jake Featherston had a personal interest in architecture he was pleased to here that another American land mark was destroyed. after the war the singer building was left abandoned until 1957 when repairs begun the building was fully restored in 1959 and was re-opened in 1960.
singer Building being fixed in 1959 (left) and the Singer Building today in 2020 (right)
View attachment 524734View attachment 524739
I've always thought that even though the Confederacy never completely controlled U.S. land besides Ohio, Sequoyah(?), some parts beyond the U.S.-C.S. border, Haiti, the Bahamas, and Bermuda; the CSA was able to do some long-distance bombing over New York City, Indianapolis, Detroit, and St. Louis. (Maybe Philadelphia? Baltimore? D.C.?)

I've always preferred the Hodder and Stroughton version of the book covers for the Settling Accounts quadrology.
Example from Return Engagement: https://www.martinmckenna.net/oldsite/pages/gallery/digital/0528/returnEngagement.htm

George HW Bush was the confederate bomber that destroyed the Singer Building and other houses and buildings in air raids at the United States during the Second Great War. After the C.S.A surrendered Bush was on a bomber plane when he herd on the radio that the C.S.A surrendered, the bomber plane flew back to a air strip but when they got back to the ground 30 Yankees held them at gun point all of the people on the plane stepped off the plane and were arrested. Bush was later acquitted but when it was founded out that Bush too part to many air raids killing lots of people he was arrested and was sent to a 76 year prison sentence. today Bush is still alive but on parole now he's living in a suburban house in Florida. In a recent interview he stated that he is now a changed man, he no longer has racist views ageist black ppl and a hatred ageist the United States. BTW Bush did not mean to destroy the singer building, he was just doing his job and he destroyed the singer building purely coincidental.
George HW Bush during the second great war (Left) and Bush being escorted out of prison in 2020 (right)
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Based on some research I could find, the Bush family would more than likely be a Union family. James Smith Bush would have never met and married Harriet Eleanor Fay from Savannah, Georgia. There IS a character named Herbert Walker in TL-191 but it was not intended to be a reference for the H.W. Bush. However, I'd imagine that this "Herbert Walker" might have looked similar to OTL H.W. Bush.

https://turtledove.fandom.com/wiki/Minor_Fictional_Characters_in_the_Settling_Accounts_Series_(M-Z)#Herbert_Walker

Bush Family paternal ancestors:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obadiah_Bush
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Smith_Bush
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_P._Bush
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prescott_Bush
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_H._W._Bush


The Battle of Greenland


A photo of Union troops offloading from a troopship at the port of Nuuk, circa 1942.

British soldiers landing at the town of Tasiilaq, circa 1942.

Following the British takeover of the Danish colonies of the Faroe Islands and Iceland, the US High Command were concerned that the British will certainly try and take the Danish colony of Greenland, which they fear that the British would use as a base to attack Union warships off the coast of Labrador and potentially try to invade Union controlled Canada. In early May of 1942, the Union Naval High Command under Earnest J. King would devise Operation North Star, which was a plan for the Union Military to move in and to occupy Greenland in order to prevent a potential British occupation, but it was also to put pressure on the British Garrison on Iceland. The operation called for the initial forces to be comprised of elements two U.S. Army Infantry divisions, a Marine division, a detachment of the US Navy Seabees (who were to build important infrastructure on Greenland), and also a Paratroop brigade. The ad hoc Naval Unit that was formed to transport them there was Task Force 43 which was commanded by Rear Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan. TF 43 would consist of Callaghan's flagship, the USS Los Angeles, the light cruisers USS Duluth, Helena, and Marblehead, 12 destroyers, 7 troopships, and three LSTs. As for the ground forces, most of them were pulled from the garrisons of the territories of Labrador and Newfoundland, with them being backed with some 75mm pack howitzers, an anti-aircraft detachment with 10 40mm AA guns, and 6 M2A4 light barrels. As for the paratroops, the plan was is that they were to dropped into Greenland by C46 Commando transports days before the arrival of the Task Force 43. Around the same time as the Union forces were forming their plan, the British were also putting together their operation in Greenland, which was codenamed as Operation Doomsday. Their landing force consisted of the heavy cruisers HMS York and HMS Dorsetshire, the light cruisers Arethusa, Orion, Emerald, and Dido, 10 destroyers, and 9 troopships. The landing force had two regular Infantry battalions, elements of the Grenadier Guards, No. 4 Commando, and elements of the Royal Marines alongside an Anti-Aircraft company and some Royal Engineers for support.

USS Duluth (CL-60) preparing to set sail with TF 43 from Cartwright Naval Base in Labrador to Greenland, circa May of 1942.

On May 24th, 1942, Task Force 43 would set sail from Cartwright to land the ground troops on Greenland, at the same time, the aircraft that were to transport the paratroops had took off from their airbases in Labrador. However there only 6 C46 Commandos available for their disposal, and so the remainder of the paratroops either arrived aboard C47s or on C79s (which were Ju-52s in Union service.) The latter aircraft had ran out of fuel when they had reached the Greenland coast, and so had to crash land.

A photograph of several Union paratroopers on the outskirts of Nanortalik after landing, note a C79 in the background preparing to crash land.

The day after the first Union forces landed in Greenland, the British forces unit Force L had arrived in Greenland, first landing at Tasiilaq on the 24th, then at Prins Christianssund on the 25th, and a detachment of the Royal Marines with the destroyer HMS Isis had attempted at landing at Nanortalik on the same day. But were driven off by the Union paratroops and local militia, and a day later, the elements of Task Force 43 had reached that village, dropping an engineer detachment with an infantry company. On that same day, the main force would arrive on the western coast of Greenland, notably offloading troops at Nuuk and Paamiut. With a few weeks, several clashes between the British and the allied Union-Danish forces had occured, notably at Ikeq Island, where the 5th Marine Company clashed with No. 4 Commando, which the resulting firefight had left 8 Union and 9 British dead.

The aftermath of a skirmish that occurred on July 16th, 1942, which the British would defeat a US Army platoon at the settlement of Tasiusaq. Which they had killed 14 men and captured the rest while only suffering 16 dead and 11 wounded.

A postwar war painting about the Raid on Nanortalik, which had occurred on September 11th, 1942. The raid was conducted by the Royal Navy as an attempt to capture the Union base, which saw the British sinking two destroyers and four cargo ships while damaging the cruisers Los Angeles (which a shell from the HMS Dido had killed Admiral Callaghan) and Helena and another destroyer, in return, the British would only loose the destroyer HMS Kelly.

The Battle of Greenland would last until August of 1943 when the Union Forces captured the settlement of Tasiilaq from the British after a week long siege. This battle would see the loss of 1,632 men dead, 2,201 wounded, and 104 missing for the Union along with 4 destroyers, 2 troopships, and 7 cargo ships sunk, 14 fighters, 15 cargo planes, and 2 bombers lost. The British would have 2,122 men killed, 2,891 wounded, and 82 missing along with 5 destroyers, 3 cargo ships, a submarine, and the cruiser HMS Orion sunk, and 13 fighters and 7 bombers shot down. Though this campaign has been badly overlooked by other battles during the war, none the less, this would be the only time other than the Battles of Bermuda, where the Union troops had come face to face with British soldiers during the Second Great War.​
I LOVE this!

I can't believe I forgot about Greenland. It's great to read about British involvement in North America during the Second Great War, even if it was minimal.

I'm kind of hoping to read a more detailed story about the First and Second Battle of Bermuda [Battle of the North Atlantic(?)], a British-Confederate joint operation to support a Canadian coup against U.S. occupation forces, the Invasion of the Bahamas, and perhaps some Czarist-British battles near Russian America against the USA, among other things.

And yet another compilation of photos


A gun crew of a Union M1938 40mm AA gun at Selfridge Airbase outside of Detroit, circa 1942.

A Confederate crewed M1935 40mm AA gun along the coast of Virginia, circa 1942. The Bofors 40mm AA gun was of Swedish origin, during the Second Great War, numerous nations on both the Central Powers and the Radius would use this model.

Confederate soldiers operating a Hotchkiss Infantry Gun in Northern Virginia, circa 1917.

Polish soldiers operating a Colt M1895 Machine-Gun as part of a Military Exchange Program in rural Ohio, circa 1922.

A photo of Polish Army General Juliusz Mórel, circa 1937. During the Second Great War, Morel was the commander of the Polish 2nd Army, which took part in the battle of Brest-Livtosk in 1941 and the Battle of Warsaw in 1942. Interestingly, Juliusz Morel was in fact a distant relative of the Union Army General Irving Morrell and even met him during his time as a military attache to the United States in 1932.

A photo of Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering, circa 1939. During the Second Great War, Goering was the Commander-in-Chief of the German Kaiserliche Luftwaffe.

A photo of Albert "Al" Koenig, circa 1934. Al Koenig was the younger brother of Secretary General Ferdinand Koenig, whom Al turned to be the complete opposite of his older brother. Al Koenig would be involved in many clandestine Anti-Freedomite groups throughout the CSA and helped smuggle Black-Confederates out of the country, often faking his brother's signatures. Whenever he was arrested for Anti-Freedomite activities, Al would use his brother's position to get him out of said situations. He was arrested following the war and put on trial at the Nashville War Crimes Tribunal, but testimonies by the people that he helped had all charges against him dropped. In the present day, Al Koenig has become a widely celebrated anti-Freedomite and a hero to the African-American community, whom hold Al in very high regard.

Edda Goering, circa 1982. In 1984, Edda Goering would win a landslide victory as the head of the German Centre Party, becoming the First Female Chancellor of Germany serving 1984 to 1991. During her time as Chancellor, her administration enacted reforms and had established relations with newly independent nations that were colonies of the Japanese Empire following it's breakup in 1990.

Ernst Rohm of the German National Socialist German Worker's Party, circa 1938. In the early 1920s, Rohm, Rudolf Hess, and a few other veterans of the First Great War would form the Actionist National Socialist German Worker's Party aka the NSDAP. Unlike the CSA, France, and England, German Actionist Parties such as the NSDAP would never gain too much popularity, in fact, at it's height in 1932, it would only have a 1,000 members and 2 seats in the Reichstag. In 1941 after war broke out, the German Authorities would arrest all senior members of the NSDAP including Rohm under suspicions that they were fifth columnists for the Radius. Rohm and his colleagues would be charged for sedition in 1942 and sentenced to 15 years imprisonment at Spandau. Rohm would be released from prison in 1948 and would live a quiet life until his death in 1963. Today, whereas the Silvershirts, Falangists, Freedomites, and Actionists are well known and are household names, the NSDAP has largely been forgotten about. In the Speculative Fiction Series known as Northern Victory by Larry Frenchen, a fictionalized version NSDAP was a part of the later part of the series as a analogue to the Confederate Freedom Party.
Excellent choices. Thank you for using some of my ideas. :)
 
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When was the biopic of Featherston made? and was it released in the United States too?
Sometime during the late 90's or early 2000.

I imagined that it was released in the U.S. without any censorship issues, surprisingly. It avoided being censored because it was mainly marketed as a historical documentary that showed dry facts about his life. The film would eventually compel American filmmakers to create their own version of a Featherston movie that dealt with the last few weeks of his life in such a dramatized, but accurate, fashion. The latter would be called Collapse and is the parallel version of OTL Downfall.

Film critics would say that both films, the German one about Featherston and the American one about Featherston before the end of SGW, compliment each other and should be watched together.
 
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