Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

Another Graphic for TL-191.


A US Navy World Capital Ship identification chart from August of 1941.
I like the chart, but isn't the Akagi and Hiryu names on the wrong ships. I mean both of them had their Island structures on the port side, but the Akagi was the one built on the hull of a battlecruiser, while the Hiryu was built from the keel up as an aircraft carrier.
 
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Confederate Soldier Stabbing an American Soldier (Note the green color of the Confederate uniform. Some Confederate platoons would often use colors that were more appropriate for camouflage during Operation Blackbeard and when Confederate forces were pushed back across the Ohio river.
Confederat Soldier Stabbing US soldier.jpg




Photograph of German POW's in Japan during the First Great War.

Sources:
Blazing Combat
https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20200121/p2a/00m/0dm/008000c
 
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My explanations of how both Finland and Denmark joined the war on the side of the Central Powers.


Finnish Army StuG III barrel-busters advancing in Northern Finland during the so-called Lapland War, circa 1943. The Lapland War was caused by a Russian attempt to intervine in the Norwegian Campagin codenamed Operation Alkonost, which involved sending 22 divisions across the Finnish frontier into Finnmark, the northern region of Norway. However this move would provoke Finland into declaring war on the Russian Empire on July 14th, 1943. As a result of this blunder, the Russians were forced to divert a total of 28 divisions to the Finnish Front away from others such as the Baltic, Ruthenian, Ukrainian, and Caucasus Front. This would eventually lead to the Russian forces being overstretched during the war, which in turn led to their ultimate defeat in 1944.


British soldiers in Reykjavik, Iceland, circa 1942. In early 1942, the British would make the decision to invade the Danish colonies of Iceland and the Faroe Island, which was codenamed Operation Fork. The official reason for the invasion was that Britain would use these islands as land bases for their long range patrol aircraft to cover the far northern reaches of the Atlantic. The invasions would be quick, bloodless, and successful for the British, but would antagonize Denmark into declaring war on Britain. Iceland and the Faroe Islands would remain occupied by Britain until war's end in the summer of 1944. Denmark would eventually grant both colonies their independence following the war, 1945 and 1947 respectively.
 
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A squad of Confederate holdouts on Haiti, listening to a broadcast from U.S. Wireless Atlanta detailing the Confederate Surrender; circa July, 1944.
Americans_on_Okinawa_hear_of_victory_in_Europe.jpg
 
The Story of the 1st Honor Guards Motorized Divison of the President Jacob Featherston

A blurry photograph of three soldiers from the 1st Honor Guards Bridgade of the President Jacob Featherston on a military exercise outside of Richmond, circa December of 1935. Note that they are wearing brown overcoats on top of their grey uniforms.

During the days of when the Freedom Party was building up to it's final victory in 1933, Jacob Featherston would be guarded a special unit of Stalwarts called the Freedom Party Guards, which was led by a man named Joseph "Fitz" Locke. Following his rise to power, Featherston would reform a section of the Freedom Party Guards until a specialized unit that was to guard him and the Grey House, it was named the 1st Honor Guards Regiment of the President Jacob Featherston or the HGRJF.

A photograph of Brigade Leader Fitz Locke, circa 1938.
1st Honor Guard.png

The emblem adopted by the 1st Honor Guards Regiment in 1934 was a white key on a blue shield, which was inspired by the surname their commander. Aside from being worn on the should sleeves as patches, this emblem would also be painted onto the unit's vehicles. The Union Army would often refer to the division as simply the Key Division.

The unit's uniform while guarding the Grey House was a grey uniform that was heavily influenced by the Confederate Army Uniforms of the War of Secession, and until 1937, would wear the Brodie Helmet in grey until being replaced by the Sydenham Helmet, which was also painted in grey.

An M-1937 Helmet from the 1st Honor Guards Dress Uniform from a private collection, circa 2017.

Throughout the 1930s, the Honor Guards would grow in size, from a regiment, to a brigade, and in November of 1940, would be made a full division and would be reformed as an motorized infantry division as well. By this time their combat uniform would change from Confederate Grey to camouflage uniforms (though many of the Division's officers would retain their grey uniforms. In 1937, the unit would take part in the invasion of Louisiana , in which the men would engage the State Police and the Longist Militia and would also imprison and execute many of the state officials. The Honor Guards would also be heavily involved of quashing Willy Knight's coup by arresting Knight and many of the associates and even executing some of them at Georgia State Prison.

Members of the 1st Honor Guard in Ohio during Operation Blackbeard, circa 1941.

When Operation Blackbeard was unleashed in August of 1941, the 1st Honor Guard Division would be deployed to the western sector of the operation, in which they would be involved in the fighting around Northern Cincinnati, Dayton, and even advancing as far as Prattville in southern Michigan. There, the unit would infamously commit the Prattville Massacre*, which they would execute 80 captured Union soldiers in a barn near the hamlet under the orders of Assault Band Leader William Morris**. After about a month around Prattville, the Division then attempted an advance towards Lansing (as part of a plan to encircle Detroit) alongside the Regular Army's 2nd and 21st Infantry and 7th Armored Division, but only advanced as far as the banks of the Grand River, which was situated between Lansing and the city of Jackson Michigan before being order to halt by none other than The Snake himself. Thus proving to be the furthest north that Operation Blackbeard ever got, and the Confederate forces were then ordered to fall to back to the city of Jackson to which they stayed there until November of 1941 when they were pulled off from the front for rest and refit in Dayton. In the Spring of 1942, the Honor Guards Division would be ordered to take part in Operation Jupiter, which was a Confederate attempt to encircle the city of Detroit, but they were stopped dead in their tracks in the Battle of Fowlerville on May 19th. Following a period of refitting following the Operation Jupiter debacle, the division would be committed to Operation Coalscuttle and would fight in the area south of Pittsburgh, getting involved in fierce fighting around the towns of Washington, Monongahela, and Donora, which was the fighting in Donora was considered a "Little Pittsburgh" due to the intensity of the fighting. Following the Battle of Donora, the badly depleted division would be transferred out of the Pittsburgh region and would spend five months in Tennessee for rest and refitting. During the Union Counter-Offensive known as Operation Rosebud, the Division would be deployed to try and halt the advance of the Yankees, but were forced back across the Ohio, where they would attempt to stop the Union Offensive, but were battered during the Union Army's drive through Kentucky and Tennessee, fighting around the regions of Lexington and London Kentucky and in the region of Knoxville Tennessee.

The corpses of the colored soldiers of the Union Army in the snow near the town of Newport, Tennessee, circa January of 1944.

On January 14th, 1944, the unit from the Honor Guard led by John Piper**** would commit one of the most infamous war crimes of the war***. Following a skirmish in the town of Newport Tennessee, the Freedom Party Guards unit would capture about 100 black soldiers from the Union Army 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion. Piper would order them out on to an open field near the town and would order his machine-gunners to shoot them, killing 84 of the POWs. A few days later after the Confederates left the area, the graves would be discovered by the Union Army and after the war, a trial would be held where Piper was found guilty of the crime and would be sentenced for 30 years hard labor, but was released in 1962 and was eventually killed by the Black Panthers in 1977.

In the last months of the war, the 1st Honor Guards would be split up, with one detachment under Morris being involved in the fighting in and around Richmond, which they fought on until finally being defeated in July of 1944. The 2nd Group under Brigade Leader Howard D. Wilkes would fight against the Union Army in North Carolina, fighting within the vicinity of Charlotte, Albemarle, and Fayettesville before ultimately surrendering to the Union Army at Fort Bragg in July of 1944. After the war, Fitz Locke would be brought to trial at the Nashville War Crimes Tribunal and was charged with a life imprisonment sentence, and would eventually die in prison in 1962.

============================================================

Inspirations:
1st SS Panzer Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler
Josef "Sepp" Dietrich
* = Wormhoudt Massacre
** = Wilhelm Mohnke
*** = Malmedy Massacre
**** = Joachim Peiper
 
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The Story of the 1st Honor Guards Motorized Divison of the President Jacob President

A blurry photograph of three soldiers from the 1st Honor Guards Bridgade of the President Jacob President on a military exercise outside of Richmond, circa December of 1935. Note that they are wearing brown overcoats on top of their grey uniforms.

During the days of when the Freedom Party was building up to it's final victory in 1933, Jacob Featherston would be guarded a special unit of Stalwarts called the Freedom Party Guards, which was led by a man named Joseph "Fitz" Locke. Following his rise to power, Featherston would reform a section of the Freedom Party Guards until a specialized unit that was to guard him and the Grey House, it was named the 1st Honor Guards Regiment of the President Jacob Featherston or the HGRJF.

A photograph of Brigade Leader Fitz Locke, circa 1938.
View attachment 520082
The emblem adopted by the 1st Honor Guards Regiment in 1934 was a white key on a blue shield, which was inspired by the surname their commander. Aside from being worn on the should sleeves as patches, this emblem would also be painted onto the unit's vehicles.

The unit's uniform while guarding the Grey House was a grey uniform that was heavily influenced by the Confederate Army Uniforms of the War of Secession, and until 1937, would wear the Brodie Helmet in grey until being replaced by the Sydenham Helmet, which was also painted in grey.

An M-1937 Helmet from the 1st Honor Guards Dress Uniform from a private collection, circa 2017.

Throughout the 1930s, the Honor Guards would grow in size, from a regiment, to a brigade, and in November of 1940, would be made a full division and would be reformed as an motorized infantry division as well. By this time their combat uniform would change from Confederate Grey to camouflage uniforms (though many of the Division's officers would retain their grey uniforms. In 1937, the unit would take part in the invasion of Louisiana , in which the men would engage the State Police and the Longist Militia and would also imprison and execute many of the state officials. The Honor Guards would also be heavily involved of quashing Willy Knight's coup by arresting Knight and many of the associates and even executing some of them at Georgia State Prison.

Members of the 1st Honor Guard in Ohio during Operation Blackbeard, circa 1941.

When Operation Blackbeard was unleashed in August of 1941, the 1st Honor Guard Division would be deployed to the western sector of the operation, in which they would be involved in the fighting around Northern Cincinnati, Dayton, and even advancing as far as Prattville in southern Michigan. There, the unit would infamously commit the Prattville Massacre*, which they would execute 80 captured Union soldiers in a barn near the hamlet under the orders of Assault Band Leader William Morris**. After about a month around Prattville, the Division then attempted an advance towards Lansing (as part of a plan to encircle Detroit) alongside the Regular Army's 2nd and 21st Infantry and 7th Armored Division, but only advanced as far as the banks of the Grand River, which was situated between Lansing and the city of Jackson Michigan before being order to halt by none other than The Snake himself. Thus proving to be the furthest north that Operation Blackbeard ever got, and the Confederate forces were then ordered to fall to back to the city of Jackson to which they stayed there until November of 1941 when they were pulled off from the front for rest and refit in Dayton. In the Spring of 1942, the Honor Guards Division would be ordered to take part in Operation Jupiter, which was a Confederate attempt to encircle the city of Detroit, but they were stopped dead in their tracks in the Battle of Fowlerville on May 19th. Following a period of refitting following the Operation Jupiter debacle, the division would be committed to Operation Coalscuttle and would fight in the area south of Pittsburgh, getting involved in fierce fighting around the towns of Washington, Monongahela, and Donora, which was the fighting in Donora was considered a "Little Pittsburgh" due to the intensity of the fighting. Following the Battle of Donora, the badly depleted division would be transferred out of the Pittsburgh region and would spend five months in Tennessee for rest and refitting. During the Union Counter-Offensive known as Operation Rosebud, the Division would be deployed to try and halt the advance of the Yankees, but were forced back across the Ohio, where they would attempt to stop the Union Offensive, but were battered during the Union Army's drive through Kentucky and Tennessee, fighting around the regions of Lexington and London Kentucky and in the region of Knoxville Tennessee.

The corpses of the colored soldiers of the Union Army in the snow near the town of Newport, Tennessee, circa January of 1944.

On January 14th, 1944, the unit from the Honor Guard led by John Piper**** would commit one of the most infamous war crimes of the war***. Following a skirmish in the town of Newport Tennessee, the Freedom Party Guards unit would capture about 100 black soldiers from the Union Army 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion. Piper would order them out on to an open field near the town and would order his machine-gunners to shoot them, killing 84 of the POWs. A few days later after the Confederates left the area, the graves would be discovered by the Union Army and after the war, a trial would be held where Piper was found guilty of the crime and would be sentenced for 30 years hard labor, but was released in 1962 and was eventually killed by the Black Panthers in 1977.

In the last months of the war, the 1st Honor Guards would be split up, with one detachment under Morris being involved in the fighting in and around Richmond, which they fought on until finally being defeated in April of 1944. The 2nd Group under Brigade Leader Howard D. Wilkes would fight against the Union Army in North Carolina, fighting within the vicinity of Charlotte, Albemarle, and Fayettesville before ultimately surrendering to the Union Army at Fort Bragg in June of 1944. After the war, Fitz Locke would be brought to trial at the Nashville War Crimes Tribunal and was charged with a life imprisonment sentence, and would eventually die in prison in 1962.

============================================================

Inspirations:
1st SS Panzer Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler
Josef "Sepp" Dietrich
* = Wormhoudt Massacre
** = Wilhelm Mohnke
*** = Malmedy Massacre
**** = Joachim Peiper
Good stuff Marlowski.
 
The Battle of Oak Alley Plantation


Oak Alley Plantation, fully restored, in 2020.
Oak Alley Plantation is a historic plantation located on the west bank of the Mississippi River, in the community of Vacherie, St. James Parish, Louisiana, USA. Oak Alley is named for its distinguishing visual feature, an alley or canopied path, created by a double row of southern live oak trees about 800 feet long. After the assassination of Louisiana’s dictatorial but beloved governor Huey Long under orders from C.S. President Jake Featherston, Oak Alley was used as a prison for high ranking Radical Liberals and other members of the deposed Longist state government who were deemed valuable to the government in Richmond. This was done in order to keep the Louisianians from rebelling against them which didn’t work (including Long’s own wife Rose Long and his son Russell Billiu Long). During the Population Reduction, the plantation was used as a waypoint for transporting Black Confederates and others deemed unfit to live by the Freedomite regime to the death camps (all the while still being used as a prison for Longists) although a good number of those destined for the camps were actually interned at Oak Alley permanently to be used for menial labour around the plantation.

On July 15, 1944 (after the death of C.S. President Jake Featherston on July 7, 1944), the prisoners and labourers, led by Russell, launched an uprising against the Confederate soldiers guarding them. The soldiers were completely surprised by this and were quickly overwhelmed with the prisoners and labourers grabbing their weapons as well as breaking into the plantation’s arsenal of military equipment (the labourers quickly and summarily executing the all guards).


Captain Ellioet James Preston (left). Major Hayden Gallagher (right).
However, a nearby unit of the Freedom Party Guards, numbering 150 men, who were patrolling nearby marched on the plantation in order to recapture it. At the same time, a detachment of the 104th barrel battalion of the 19th United States Army under the command of U.S. Army captain Elliot J. Preston teamed up with a platoon of muntying Confederate soldiers, who surrendered to Preston’s group three days earlier at Vacherie, under the command of major Hayden Gallagher (who had been collaborating with the Louisianian Partisans) to rescue the prisoners and labourers of Oak Alley.

Members of joint Union-Confederate forces who defended Oak Alley Plantation (top). Freedom Party Guardsmen attacking the plantation (upper-centre). Gallagher’s Mutineers fighting Guardsmen in the nearby forests (lower-centre). Union troops defend their positions against the FPG (bottom).​

It was Major Gallagher who presented the mission to Preston. Gallagher had been informed of the situation at the plantation by the Black cook there who had manage to escape unscathed and hat met up local Louisianian partisan resistance fighters who had joined up with Gallagher’s men (who now saw the major as their leader).


Louisianian partisans nearing the plantation.​

The joint Union-Confederate-Partisan force arrived at Oak Alley and helped the prisoners and labourers set up better defences of the plantation including; setting up positions in strategic locations such as the roof, parking a Confederate Army tank at the plantation’s front gate to cover the road, and planning strategies to defend the plantation against the inevitable FPG assault.

That night, a small reconnaissance group of Freedom Party Guardsmen launched a probing attack on the Oak Alley Plantation to test the strength of their enemies with the defenders responding in kind.

At dawn the next day, the real battle for the plantation began with the Guardsmen using a 6-pounder anti-tank gun to knock out the tank at the gate and destroy part of the plantation. Throughout the whole battle, the Freedom Party Guardsmen where able to wound or kill several of the defenders, including Major Gallagher himself who saved the life of Russell B. Long from an incoming sniper’s bullet.

The battle ended in an victory for the defenders when reinforcements from 25th Infantry division of the 19th United States Army arrived and forced to surrender of the Freedom Party Guardsmen.


Members of the 25th division advancing towards Oak Alley Plantation.​
 
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The Battle of Oak Alley Plantation
Oak Alley Plantation is a historic plantation located on the west bank of the Mississippi River, in the community of Vacherie, St. James Parish, Louisiana, USA. Oak Alley is named for its distinguishing visual feature, an alley or canopied path, created by a double row of southern live oak trees about 800 feet long. After the assassination of Louisiana’s dictatorial but beloved governor Huey Long under orders from C.S. President Jake Featherston, Oak Alley was used a prison for high ranking Radical Liberals and other members of the deposed Longist state government deemed valuable to the government in Richmond in order to keep the Louisianians from rebelling against them which didn’t work (including Long’s own wife Rose Long and his son Russell Billiu Long). During the Population Reduction, the plantation was used as a waypoint for transporting Black Confederates and others deemed unfit to live by the Freedomite regime to the death camps (all the while still being used a a prison for Longists) although a good number of those destined for the camps were actually interned at Oak Alley permanently to be used for menial labour around the plantation.

On July 15, 1944 (after the death of C.S. President Jake Featherston on July 7, 1944), the prisoners and labourers, led by Russell, launched an uprising against the Confederate soldiers guarding them. The soldiers were completely surprised by this and were quickly overwhelmed with the prisoners and labourers grabbing their weapons as well as breaking into the plantation’s arsenal of military equipment (the labourers quickly and summarily executing the all guards).


Captain Ellioet James Preston (left). Major Hayden Gallagher (right).
However, nearby unit of the Freedom Party Guards, numbering 150 men, who were patrolling nearby marched on the plantation in order to recapture it. At the same time, a detachment of the 104th barrel battalion of the 19th United States Army under the command of U.S. Army captain Elliot J. Preston teamed up with a platoon of muntying Confederate soldiers, who surrendered to Preston’s group three days earlier at Vacherie, under the command of major Hayden Gallagher (Who has been collaborating with the Louisianian Partisans) to rescue the prisoners and labourers of Oak Alley.

Members of joint Union-Confederate forces who defended Oak Alley Plantation (top). Freedom Party Guardsmen attacking the plantation (upper-centre). Gallagher’s Mutineers fighting Guardsmen in the nearby forests (lower-centre). Union troops defend their positions against the FPG (bottom).​

It was Major Gallagher who presented to mission to Preston. Gallagher has been informed of the situation at the plantation by the Black cook there who had meet up local Louisianian partisan resistance fighters who had joined up Gallagher’s men and now saw the major as their leader.


Louisianian partisans nearing the plantation.​

The joint Union-Confederate-Partisan force arrived at Oak Alley and helped the prisoners and labourers set up better defences of the plantation including; setting up positions in strategic locations such as the roof, parking a Confederate Army tank at the plantation’s front gate to cover the road, and planning strategies to defend the plantation against the inevitable FPG assault.

That night, a small reconnaissance group of Freedom Party Guardsmen launched a probing attack on the Oak Alley Plantation to test the strength of their enemies with the defenders responding in kind.

At dawn the next day, the real battle for the plantation began with the Guardsmen using a 6-pounder anti-tank gun to knock out the tank at the gate and destroy part of the plantation. Throughout the whole battle, the Freedom Party Guardsmen where able to wound or kill several of the defenders, including Major Gallagher himself who saved the life of Russell B. Long from an incoming sniper’s bullet.

The battle ended in an victory for the defenders when reinforcements from 25th Infantry division of the 19th United State Army arrived and forced to surrender of the Freedom Party Guardsmen.


Members of the 25th division advancing towards Oak Alley Plantation.​
I've heard about the OTL story you based this on, good job.
 
Story of the Donner Brigade

Several men from the Donner Brigade in Northern Alabama on an anti-partisan sweep, circa 1943.

In early 1940, the Confederate Department of Justice got a phone call from Attorney Koenig's office informing them that President Featherston had decided to give "suspended sentences to so-called "honorable poachers" and, depending on their behavior on the front, to pardon them." The order would specify state that they should not be of crimes involving trap setting, and to be enrolled in the marksmen rifle corps. Their commander was a man by the name of Hugh Donner, a Freedom Party member who had a history of being very violent which included raping adolescent girls and by all accounts, was a sadist.

A photo of Standard Leader Hugh Donner, circa 1941. Donner had served in the Army of Tennessee as an infantryman during the First Great War and had fought against the Negro Marxist Revolutionaries in Alabama. He would join the Freedom Party in 1921 and would also work at a bank and a knitwear factory. He was convicted in 1934 after raping a 14 year old office girl and stealing government property. The party would expel him and was forced to reapply for membership. After serving a 2 year sentence, Donner was released, but was incarcerated yet again for rape. In 1938, he would join the Freedom Party Guards in the Security Department and from there, would become the leader of a special unit.

The emblem of the Donner Brigade aka the 36th Special Security Division. The emblem featured a Griswold revolver, a broken sabre, and a deathshead symbol. The Union Army and the Negro Partisans would refer to this unit as the Head Hunters as a reference to both the men's criminal history and to their emblem.

In late 1940, the unit would be readied for their first anti-partisan sweep in South Carolina with Assault Band Leader Donner under his command with 300 men (who were all selected due to their disciplinary and criminal records). In the month of October alone, the Donner Brigade would kill a total of 74 Negro Partisans (51 were killed in firefights while all of the others were brutally executed by the men of the Brigade.) According to the author Matthew Cooper, "Wherever the Donner unit operated, murder and rape formed an everyday part of life and indiscriminate slaughter, beatings, and looting were rife." In June of 1941 alone, the unit would murder 4,000 Negroes in the Anderson Ghetto and 316 partisans and a further 700 labeled as "fugitive Negroes." In September of 1941, the unit was authorized to be expanded to a regiment sized unit, with new recruits being enlisted from the criminal underclass and military delinquents.

A member of the Donner Regiment in his camouflage uniform with a Colt M42 that he picked up off a dead partisan, circa 1942.

Throughout 1942 and most of 1943, the Regiment would operate throughout the Black Belt regions of the Confederacy, doing anti-partisan operations within the regions. But by late 1943 as the war situation grew dire for the CSA, the unit, now a division, was committed to the frontlines against the invading Union Army. There, they would prove to as atrocious to captured Union soldiers as to the African-Confederate population. The most notable example was the Scottsboro Massacre, where the men of the Donner Division executed 140 captured Union Soldiers (most of whom were whites) in a very brutal manner. During a skirmish near the town of Wattsville outside of Birmingham, Donner was seriously wounded and was sent to the rear. Replacing him was Chief Assault Leader Samuel Wellington, who tried to reorganize the battered unit, but unfortunately, with Donner gone, many of the men would desert from the division. By June 2nd, 1944, he realized that his unit virtually ceased to exist and so, would resign from his post. The remnants of the 36th Division would eventually be wiped out during the fighting in Birmingham by June 22nd. In August 2nd, 1944, Donner would be captured by the Union Army while attempting to flee to Mexico at the city of Shreveport in Louisiana, and he had died at their hands by August 8th, he was lynched by a group of blacks who happened to recognize him. Allegedly, the soldiers who were guarding him had helped them execute Donner.

=============================================

I bet all of you reading this knows what OTL Group that I am basing this off of.​
 
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Story of the Donner Brigade

Several men from the Donner Brigade in Northern Alabama on an anti-partisan sweep, circa 1943.

In early 1940, the Confederate Department of Justice got a phone call from Attorney Koenig's office informing them that President Featherston had decided to give "suspended sentences to so-called "honorable poachers" and, depending on their behavior on the front, to pardon them." The order would specify state that they should not be of crimes involving trap setting, and to be enrolled in the marksmen rifle corps. Their commander was a man by the name of Hugh Donner, a Freedom Party member who had a history of being very violent which included raping adolescent girls and by all accounts, was a sadist.

A photo of Standard Leader Hugh Donner, circa 1941. Donner had served in the Army of Tennessee as an infantryman during the First Great War and had fought against the Negro Marxist Revolutionaries in Alabama. He would join the Freedom Party in 1921 and would also work at a bank and a knitwear factory. He was convicted in 1934 after raping a 14 year old office girl and stealing government property. The party would expel him and was forced to reapply for membership. After serving a 2 year sentence, Donner was released, but was incarcerated yet again for rape. In 1938, he would join the Freedom Party Guards in the Security Department and from there, would become the leader of a special unit.

The emblem of the Donner Brigade aka the 36th Special Security Division. The emblem featured a Griswold revolver, a broken sabre, and a deathshead symbol. The Union Army and the Negro Partisans would refer to this unit as the Head Hunters as a reference to both the men's criminal history and to their emblem.

In late 1940, the unit would be readied for their first anti-partisan sweep in South Carolina with Assault Band Leader Donner under his command with 300 men (who were all selected due to their disciplinary and criminal records). In the month of October alone, the Donner Brigade would kill a total of 74 Negro Partisans (51 were killed in firefights while all of the others were brutally executed by the men of the Brigade.) According to the author Matthew Cooper, "Wherever the Donner unit operated, murder and rape formed an everyday part of life and indiscriminate slaughter, beatings, and looting were rife." In June of 1941 alone, the unit would murder 4,000 Negroes in the Anderson Ghetto and 316 partisans and a further 700 labeled as "fugitive Negroes." In September of 1941, the unit was authorized to be expanded to a regiment sized unit, with new recruits being enlisted from the criminal underclass and military delinquents.

A member of the Donner Regiment in his camouflage uniform with a Colt M42 that he picked up off a dead partisan, circa 1942.

Throughout 1942 and most of 1943, the Regiment would operate throughout the Black Belt regions of the Confederacy, doing anti-partisan operations within the regions. But by late 1943 as the war situation grew dire for the CSA, the unit, now a division, was committed to the frontlines against the invading Union Army. There, they would prove to as atrocious to captured Union soldiers as to the African-Confederate population. The most notable example was the Scottsboro Massacre, where the men of the Donner Division executed 140 captured Union Soldiers (who of whom were whites) in a very brutal manner. During a skirmish near the town of Wattsville outside of Birmingham, Donner was seriously wounded and was sent to the rear. Replacing him was Chief Assault Leader Samuel Wellington, who tried to reorganize the battered unit, but unfortunately, with Donner gone, many of the men would desert from the division. By June 2nd, 1944, he realized that his unit virtually ceased to exist and so, would resign from his post. The remnants of the 36th Division would eventually be wiped out during the fighting in Birmingham by June 22nd. In August 2nd, 1944, Donner would be captured by the Union Army while attempting to flee to Mexico at the city of Shreveport in Louisiana, and he had died at their hands by August 8th, he was lynched by a group of blacks who happened to recognize him. Allegedly, the soldiers who were guarding him had helped them execute Donner.

=============================================

I bet all of you reading this knows what OTL Group that I am basing this off of.​
That was chillingly good.
 
Some graphics that I had made for TL-191




A catalog page from Shotgun News made in 2002.
Very cool, I can imagine seeing ads like this in gun magazines in the 1960's of TL-191.
I would've liked to have bought a Tredegar 1938, a Griswald 35 and a V37. :cool:
 
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A bronze shield on the front of the German Aviation Collection in Berlin, circa 2019.

The German Aviation Collection was first established in 1936 in a former factory building, which the funding and concept of the museum was provided by the Minister of Aviation, Hermann Goering and by General Manfred von Richthofen, where were present at the museum during it's opening ceremony. The centerpiece of the collection is the giant Dorner X, which was the world's largest flying boat. Throughout the SGW, the Museum would obtain several Russian, British, and French Aircraft for both display purposes and would host a war bond drive. Following the war, the museum would receive it's first major expansion which lasted from 1945 to 1948 before reopening in 1949, which it also have a large number of new aircraft in it's collection such as the Junkers Ju-22, Fokker D-109, Focke Wulf 190, even a few Union and Confederate aircraft such as a Hounddog and a P-27 Sky Shark alongside the numerous other Radius Aircraft that were captured during the war by the Germans such as a Spitfire Mk. XIV, Arsenal VB 10, and Yakovlev Yak-9U. Over the years, the museum was expanded another two times (in the 1960s and 1990s respectively.) Which there a great many more aircraft added to it's collection including numerous Japanese Aircraft acquired during the 1990s following the Dissolution of the Japanese Empire, a Junkers Ju-689 Supersonic Turbo Airliner of 1970s vintage, and the collection even including German and Austrian Space Vehicles (such as the Freya 10 Space Capsule.) Today, the Collection is widely regarded the World's Largest Air and Space Museums and also one of the best in the world.
 
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