Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alternatehistoryguy47, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. Historyman 14 Well-Known Member

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    This may prove useful on the matter of Blacks in Missouri.
     
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  2. Zoidberg12 Well-Known Member

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    Rafeal Trujillo, President of the Dominican Republic from 1930 until his US-backed deposition in 1946. During his rule, the ruling party known as the Dominican Party, which had been described by many historians as Actionist, was the sole legal party in the nation, and Haitians and Afro-Dominicans in the Dominican Republic suffered persecution and even ethnic cleansing, despite Trujillo himself being part Black Haitian himself. During the Second Great War, Trujillo, while keeping the Dominican Republic officially neutral during the war, maintained friendly relations with Featherston's Confederate States, and wanting to have a place for his nation in the Confederate "New Order", actively surrendered about 100 to 250,000 Haitians and Afro-Dominicans to the Confederates and their death-camps in Confederate-occupied Haiti. In May, 1946, almost two years after the end of the war, an American joint operations between the USMC and Navy invaded the Dominican Republic and overthrow Trujillo, who was then placed in US Military Custody. After a brief trail, on June 24, 1947, Trujillo was executed by hanging in Santo Domingo, the capital city he once named after himself as Ciudad Trujillo, for crimes against humanity. The US then installed a provisional occupation and provisional government before recreating the Dominican Republic as the third Dominican Republic on July 1, 1954.

    OCC: Much of this comes from this post.

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    Hector Trujillo, the younger brother and close associate of the aforementioned dictator and a general in the Dominican Army who actively participated in the murders of and deportations of Haitians and Afro-Dominicans into Confederate-occupied Haiti. After the US invasion of the Dominican Republic, he was arrested, tried and finally executed for crimes against humanity on October 26, 1947.

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    Joaquín Balaguer, the first democratically-elected President of the Dominican Republic after the Trujillo dictatorship. Until his death in 2000, he served as President of the Dominican Republic many times, first from 1954 to 1960, then from 1970 to 1976 and again from 1988 to 1996.
     
  3. Roosevelt 26th President

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    Photograph of the American superbombing of Newport News, Virginia. Casualties were relatively low when compared to the superbombing of Philadelphia as roughly 30,000 of the city's 50,000* inhabitants were killed by the blast.

    *figured Newport News would be larger if the CSA receives immigrants from Europe during the 19th and early 20th century.
     
  4. Historyman 14 Well-Known Member

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    Danthefan28, Pangur, cortz#9 and 6 others like this.
  5. Allochronian Well-Known Member

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    originaltimeline
  6. Historyman 14 Well-Known Member

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    Sep 27, 2013
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    In the Land of the Ancients.
    Thanks! I found it an while ago and thought it would fit great here.

    (Now only if we had stuff like this for all the wars after the War of Secession. )
     
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  7. Historyman 14 Well-Known Member

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    In the Land of the Ancients.
    Random random stuff about my homestate of Mississippi.

    Mississippi before War of Secession. (1848-1862.)

    1: Both Democratic and Whig Party was against California Statehood.

    2: 1850 Compromise reaction is dramatic, prompting political realignment and an rush towards secession. Senator Foote lead many Mississippians with most Whigs and some Democrats into the Union Party, who was willing to give the compromise an chance and seek to perverse the union by by compromise. Foote himself was actively involved in formulating the legislation that admitted California as an free state also pushed for 'popular sovereignty' provision to vote on slavery.

    2: Against them was the State Rights Party of Democrats who favor secession who had the support of Senator Davis, Governor Quitman, and most of the Legislature.

    3: Foote wins the Governorship by only 999 votes in 1851 and the Union Party gain controlled of the State House of Representatives. His term was largely an lull in sectional tension till 1854.

    4: Democrat John J. McRae (1854-1857.) promoted state improvements, such as the construction of railroads. Before leaving office, trains where running through Jackson to New Orleans on the Great Northen Railroad and through Meridian to Mobile and Ohio. Appropriate more money for state schools and adoption an new state code.

    5: The Ostend Manifesto.

    6: 1855, Governor McRae defeats Know-Nothing candidate Charles D. Fontaine, an former Democrat. National Democratic Party start to divide along sectional lines.

    7: Mississippi Representative William Barksdale assists Preston Brooks beating Charles Summer by holding Summer by the coat.

    8: Mississippians have hope for an resolution with the election of James Buchanan. Jacob Thompson of Mississippi becomes Sectary of the Interior. Robert J. Walker of Mississippi is appointed Governor of the Kansas Territory, but soon resigns over the validity of of the Lecompton Constitution

    9: William McWillie first year as Governor seem to be an lull as he urgent the need to protect the fertile bottomland from flooding with levees and building additional railroads. This ends with Harper's Ferry. Democrat John Jones Pettus and disunionist disciple of Quitman overpowers Harvey W. Walter.

    10: Pettus recommends $ 150, 000 for weapons and ammunition. Mississippi State Convention on Secession meet in Jackson, January 7, 1861 with William Barry as President and Lucius Q.C Lamar as Chairman to draft an ordinance of secession. Approved, 84, to 15.

    11: Battle of Ship Island.

    12: Shiloh and Corinth.

    13: Admiral David Farragut bombs Vicksburg throughout July.

    Antebellum Mississippi/Pre-Civil War/War off Secession.

    1: Start of the Civil War, there was an total of 437, 404 slaves, and less then 800 free blacks.

    2: Panic of 1837. Except for one in Yazoo City and one in Holly Springs, every private bank became insolvent, forfeited its charter and shuttered its doors.

    3: Elite planters were concentrated in the most desirable agricultural regions along the Mississippi River. (The Natchez district.) Smaller planters cleared lands in the interior. The planter class was less then 20% of all slaveholders, and 1% of white families. Tons of famous duels.

    By 1860, less then half of all white families could own even one slave. Yeoman farmers compose the majority of white families with varying social and political interests.

    4: Mississippi Married Women's Property Act of 1839 which protected an married woman ownership of property.

    5: Jefferson College, the Whitworth Female College, the Mississippi College, Oakland College. (We was underschooled.)

    6: The Methodist Church was by large the largest denomination. By 1860, it was reported 60,000 members including 11,000 African Americans in 606 Churches.

    7: Baptist churches was found in primarily in small rural communities. By 1860, 41,000 members in 529 churches. Slaves may have composed as much as one-third of Baptists members.

    Presbyterians developed churches thanks to Scot-Irish immigration in the territory. Mississippi Presbytery founded in 1816. By 1835, the Synod of Mississippi was establish with 24 Presbyterians churches. Reached only 148 by 1860. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church came in the 1830s and had 60 churches in the Northen half of Mississippi by 1860 appealing to different sets of people.

    Oldest was the Roman Catholic and Episcopalians. The Roman Catholic disappear when Spain left in 1798, until the 1840s when the Diocse of Natchez got it first bishop, and by 1860, there was only 17 churches. The Episcopalians got kicked out by the Spanish and didn't reocver till the 1820s to organize its first Diocese. Attracted wealthy planters, merchants and professionals, there was 25 Episcopal churches, mostly in the Natchez and the Gulf.

    Jews mostly in Vicksburg, Natchez, Jackson and so on. (See here, here. And Beth Israel Congregation.)

    8: Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek and the Treaty of Pontotoc Creek.

    9: The Nullifier Faction jointed with the Whigs to form an unusual politician alliance. (Expect they the share dislike of President I AM THE LAW Jackson, they shared very little.) During the 1830s, the Whig-Nullifier group was often able to successfully the Jacksonian Democrats in statewide political contests.

    The Wings in Mississippi would be the OTL 'Bourbons'. Democrats/aristocratic conservatives who ran the State after Reconstruction and an lot of the time acted like it was still 1860 and not 1877, or water it down. For what it was worth, they did support diversify the state with outside investment to fuel railroads, industrial manufacturing, and was willing to work with Northen businessmen, fiends in big business as it were. (Among them was Lucius Q.C Lamar, Longstreet's VP, John Marshall Stone, Robert Lowry, James Z. George, and Edward C. Walthall. )

    Then the OTL Populists of the State, the Radical Liberals. The small farmers and progressive third-party. (Financial reform, sliver coins, and paper notes. And to protect farmers from falling commodity prices and big on regulations to stop railroads from engaging in price-fixing schemes.) Among them Oliver Hudson Kelley, Thomas Gore, Absolom M. West, Rufus K. Prewitt, Clark Lewis, Joseph H. Beeman, and Frank Burkitt.

    The Liberals (before the merger with the Radicals) would be competing with the Radicals (populists, financial reformers, industrialists) and a Farmers party. The Mississippi merger of Radicals, Liberals, and Farmers would be enough to really challenge the Whigs for the Governorship. (Thanks to @Joshua Ben Ari.)
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019