PC/WI: Berberized Al-Andalus

When and how can we insert a strong Berber cultural, political, and religious component into Al-Andalus, after its conquest by Islamic forces? Perhaps through a more successful spread of the Berber Revolt of the 740's into Iberia?
What would be the effects of a less Arab, more Berber Al-Andalus on the history of Iberia? Would Al-Andalus stay united or fragment?
 
When and how can we insert a strong Berber cultural, political, and religious component into Al-Andalus, after its conquest by Islamic forces? Perhaps through a more successful spread of the Berber Revolt of the 740's into Iberia?
What would be the effects of a less Arab, more Berber Al-Andalus on the history of Iberia? Would Al-Andalus stay united or fragment?
Almohades (the Berbers) established control over all of Islamic Iberia in 1172. Moved capital from Cordoba to Seville and at least initially restored the strict Islamic rule (most if not all pre-invasion rulers had been killed).
 
Almohades (the Berbers) established control over all of Islamic Iberia in 1172. Moved capital from Cordoba to Seville and at least initially restored the strict Islamic rule (most if not all pre-invasion rulers had been killed).
Well, i am aware of the post-taifa period Berber empires that sprang from Morocco and invaded Spain between the 1070's and 1340.
Although, what i'm trying to explore are the implications of the Umayyad Caliphate of Cordoba having never existed, being immediately replaced by a Berber monarchy, or oligarchy, or confederation, or set of states. IIRC, the Cordoban Caliphate encouraged a certain cultural Arabization of its populace, or at least upper class and nobility, and i think it'd be interesting to see an islamic Al-Andalus without that Arabic cultural hegemony in the first place.
 
Collapse of the caliphate plus some sort of weakening of Islam around the Middle East. The Barghawata and their syncretic version of Islam (including a Berber language Koran) fills in the gap, and eventually a significant Berber minority is established (along with cultural Berber practices).
 
Well, i am aware of the post-taifa period Berber empires that sprang from Morocco and invaded Spain between the 1070's and 1340.
Although, what i'm trying to explore are the implications of the Umayyad Caliphate of Cordoba having never existed, being immediately replaced by a Berber monarchy, or oligarchy, or confederation, or set of states. IIRC, the Cordoban Caliphate encouraged a certain cultural Arabization of its populace, or at least upper class and nobility, and i think it'd be interesting to see an islamic Al-Andalus without that Arabic cultural hegemony in the first place.
IIRC, in OTL Islamization was quite limited (one of the reason being ability to tax Christians at a higher rate) but at least eventually there was a lot of cooperation/interaction between the Muslims and Christians: look at El Cid's career as the best known example.
As I understand at least some kind of cooperation with the Christian rulers started as soon as Caliphate of Almohades started having problems.
 
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