@Averious ! welcome back and amazing chapter!

YES! Thus begins the legend of the White Prince and future White king!

Long live Joao I the Great! The Best king portugal ever had!Love the trastamaras but they belong in spain not portugal!

Can't wait for Joao's marriage to Philippa of lancaster and the cementing of the glorious anglo-portuguese alliance!
Glad you enjoyed it!
I know who this is a reference to, considering we've noted Tamerlane multiple times.
You don't know, it could be Lanetamer for all you know.
 
Great chapter πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘. John Prince of Wales has proven himself in battle against the Castilians, securing an ally his throne. Maybe John will marry a Portuguese princess in the future? I hope Bagrat and his sons are successful in freeing Georgia from the Mongols. You think we can get a chapter showcasing how things are going in France?

Keep up the great work!!!
 
Great chapter πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘. John Prince of Wales has proven himself in battle against the Castilians, securing an ally his throne. Maybe John will marry a Portuguese princess in the future? I hope Bagrat and his sons are successful in freeing Georgia from the Mongols. You think we can get a chapter showcasing how things are going in France?

Keep up the great work!!!
And this will definitely show england and SPECIALLY france that John is NOT another Lackland, but rather another John II of Eastern Rome in the making.
 
And this will definitely show england and SPECIALLY france that John is NOT another Lackland, but rather another John II of Eastern Rome in the making.
John II will be the complete opposite of Lackland. A tall, intelligent, warrior king who beats the French in battle and breaks the power of Magna Carta/Parliament 😎😎😎.
 
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John II will be the complete opposite of Lackland. A tall, intelligent, warrior king who beats the French in battle and breaks the power Magna Carta/Parliament 😎😎😎.
Yep! Cutting his loses as best as he can before turning to Scotland and finishing longshanks noble work. And HELL YEAH to the latter.
 
Manuel stepped forwards, wrapped an arm around Alexandros' shoulder, and pointed up at them, "I think, my friend, that we will accomplish great things together,"
It'll be interesting to see what Alexandros Kydoniatis manages to build for the Empire. If the Venetians won't give back their stolen items, the Romans will make even grander sculptures!!!
 
Random idea, but would be cool if the future wars with Timur look like something out of the First Crusade. We see Manuel II (or John and Constantine if they become Emperors) call for aid and assistance against this great threat from Persia.

Many people throughout Christendom take up the call to assist Rhomania, some think it a crusade while others don't (mostly out of dislike for the heretical Greeks). An eclectic group made up of Englishmen (Irish and Scots also came), Frenchmen, Germans, Italians, Slavs, and even Spaniards make their way to the Empire. Just imagine the thoughts they might have when they enter Constantinople.

Already thinking of a scene with English and French getting into a fight, maybe their respective monarchs are involved, and the Emperor himself has to cool things down 🀣🀣🀣.

Edit: Release another chapter @Averious!!!
I saw you liking my comment 😀😀😀
 
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Random idea, but would be cool if the future wars with Timur look like something out of the First Crusade. We see Manuel II (or John and Constantine if they become Emperors) call for aid and assistance against this great threat from Persia.

Many people throughout Christendom take up the call to assist Rhomania, some think it a crusade while others don't (mostly out of dislike for the heretical Greeks). An eclectic group made up of Englishmen (Irish and Scots also came), Frenchmen, Germans, Italians, Slavs, and even Spaniards make their way to the Empire. Just imagine the thoughts they might have when they enter Constantinople.

Already thinking of a scene with English and French getting into a fight, maybe their respective monarchs are involved, and the Emperor himself has to cool things down 🀣🀣🀣.
This would be one fun ride if that happens.
 
Update 2 New
You'll have noticed the flurry of Chapters have gone down; for that I'm sorry, but there are two key reasons which I feel the need to make clear to you all who make an effort to read this TL.

The original cause of the slowdown was that we're entering into a period of history where a lot of research is required, and I've had help researching as far as 1404. This took a lot of time, but I have a lot of information to work with now, and I'm about halfway through the next Chapter.

The latest issue however, which rudely interrupted me just today, is that my internet has gone 'caput', and data charges are exorbitant here when my finances really can't cope with it--so until I find a sort of solution to the matter I won't be able to post anywhere near as regularly, which irks me because I hate leaving you lot hanging.

I'll be doing my best to resolve the issue and hopefully get back to posting Chapters regularly again.

Thanks for putting up with the long wait times.
 
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You'll have noticed the flurry of Chapters have gone down; for that I'm sorry, but there are two key reasons which I feel the need to make clear to you all who make an effort to read this TL.

The original cause of the slowdown was that we're entering into a period of history where a lot of research is required, and I've had help researching as far as the 1404. This took a lot of time, but I have a lot of information to work with now, and I'm about halfway through the next Chapter.

The latest issue however, which rudely interrupted me just today, is that my internet has gone 'caput', and data charges are exorbatant here when my finances really can't cope with it--so until I find a sort of solution to the matter I won't be able to post anywhere near as regularly, which irks me because I hate leaving you lot hanging.

I'll be doing my best to resolve the issue and hopefully get back to posting Chapters regularly again.

Thanks for putting up with the long wait times.
Np bro, the first one is understandable and it shows your commitment to making this TL the best it can be.

And the second is out of your control, hope that you can fix it in due time.

Hope you all the best, we will always be here. this TL is GOLDEN
 
You'll have noticed the flurry of Chapters have gone down; for that I'm sorry, but there are two key reasons which I feel the need to make clear to you all who make an effort to read this TL.

The original cause of the slowdown was that we're entering into a period of history where a lot of research is required, and I've had help researching as far as the 1404. This took a lot of time, but I have a lot of information to work with now, and I'm about halfway through the next Chapter.

The latest issue however, which rudely interrupted me just today, is that my internet has gone 'caput', and data charges are exorbitant here when my finances really can't cope with it--so until I find a sort of solution to the matter I won't be able to post anywhere near as regularly, which irks me because I hate leaving you lot hanging.

I'll be doing my best to resolve the issue and hopefully get back to posting Chapters regularly again.

Thanks for putting up with the long wait times.
Take your time! We'll be waiting for you!
 
Book 2; 1387 Part I, the Battle of Birtvisi New
Ioannes the Younger had never wanted to be a Prince, at least in the way it mattered; he was a warrior, not a ruler, and that had been clear from the moment he'd chosen to take to playing with weapons over any kind of studying on the finer arts of being Emperor.

Even more clear when he snubbed his bride in favour of focusing fully on things such as training his equestrianism.

In truth, his father had never held it against him, he loved his son too much for that--but Manuel had planned around it; the Emperor himself choosing to avoid giving commands on how to raise his grandchildren.

But? What Ioannes the Younger did now, as he rallied his hundred-strong retinue to depart Constantinople, was much bigger than that. He was leaving, and his twin looked across at him, as he made final preparations for his horse, and his men; ignoring the hustle and bustle in the Boukoleon Harbour. The Prince of Hellas wasn't here; he was angry with his son--and the Emperor simply watched from the walls above.

Manuel had refused to see him depart, but had given him a sizeable sum with which to conduct himself.

"You shouldn't be doing this; we can't spare you," Constantine pressed his brother--but Ioannes was unmoved, offering his brother a soft smile, and then hugging him, before dipping back--lest his twin grab at him to force him to stay.

"I should; you rule, I fight--that was how it was meant to be,"


1387 Part I

The West, those lands of Iberia, and France, once more rally.

Navarre, itself a French-held, thus allied, polity came forth with a new ruler come January, Charles III--and in that same month so too did the Crown of Aragon see the rise of Juan I; both men after the deaths of their fathers.

Juan, breaking with the policies of his forebears, would choose to ally himself with the maimed Castile, as well as France, over that of England; viewing their recent intrusions into the affairs of the Iberian peninsula with offence, and taking what he viewed as a chance at a relationship with Castile, and France, both it's greatest regional rivals, on his own terms.

The Black Prince, although now more so a title of reverence than an actual one, was obviously quite displeased about this--but with things as they were, well, he hadn't much reason, or ability, to make a strike against 'traitors and turncoats'. Instead, instructing his son John, Prince of Wales, to shore up things with their Portuguese allies; worried about a coming storm.

In the Caucasus the Kartvelians were, come the end of January, fully appraised of the situation their realm was in--and it was, quite frankly, not pretty. Only the north and northwestern lands of Georgia had escaped relatively unscathed in the invasion--the rest, not so much; a bleak picture, and one that when painted made clear the fact that the realm sorely lacked the resources it would need to shore up, and see off, any further invasions.

Especially given the fact that, by February, all accounts pointed to the fact that the ambush of the 12,000 'escorts' hadn't gone unnoticed, and the Chagataids were none too pleased--especially their great general.

King Bagrat V realised then quite quickly that his strategic circumstances were quite unfavourable, and spent many a sleepless night trying to parse out a path forward to victory... but none came easily to him, except begging their nominal allies for aid.

The Trapezuntines were never a strong polity to begin with, but close friends--their neighbours north of the Caucasus weren't interested... the key would be the Romans, but as Bagrat had heard, well--their field army was exhausted, and it would be hypocritical to beg them for aid when they were barely holding the line against the Turks.

But, hypocrisy didn't matter to the King, his realm and people did--so he begged.

In mid-February envoys arrived in both Trebizond and then Constantinople; pressing Georgia's 'great Christian allies' for aid against the Chagataids.

Of course, Trebizond pledged what it could--but the Romans? There was much scrutiny, and thinking--broken when Ioannes the Younger, grandson of the Emperor of the same name, decided to break the deadlock come the mid-month after having been inspired by the notion of riding to the aid of his Christian comrades.

He cared little for Princely duty--or politics; the entire affair angered the Prince of Hellas, his father because while Manuel had been willing to assuage Ioannes' need to play soldier and officer over Prince the Prince of Hellas had not wanted him to leave the Empire; an Empire which needed a skilled cavalry officer, and a man who could command respect.

Ioannes would depart though, just as the mid-month ended--with moneys from both his grandfather, and father (although the latter refused to see him off), and a hundred riders of his own choosing.

Come the near-end of February they would arrive in Trebizond, with Ioannes wanting to meet his aunt Irene, now Empress of Trebizond--which he did, collecting the similarly sized 100 or so men rallied by Trebizond for Georgia, and departing.

Just as February was coming to a close the Roman-Trapezuntine army arrived in Poti [1], and from there marched east deeper into Georgia, wherein they would soon meet up with King Bagrat V.

While the King was undoubtedly grateful that his efforts had borne fruit... well, he'd been hoping for more; even had the army been ten times the size their enemies would still outnumber it sizeably--a notion which still plagued him with fear.

Winter slowly gave way to Spring come March, and with the thaw starting the Chagataids didn't allow a moment to pass; they came thundering into Georgia once more--overturning surviving fortresses in their wake, putting to the torch those areas of rural land that had escaped them until now--lacking even the modicum of mercy their previous attacks had had.

The populace of Georgia had thought such an escalation impossible, but they had been proven quite wrong.

Bagrat's response was swift, and measured; taking each and every armed man he had at his disposal and carefully dissolving them into small skirmishing units that would, as he instructed, lash out at the invaders from the mountains, and high hills, with their superior knowledge of the terrain; they would drain the Chagataids of morale, and men, gradually, as the invaders wouldn't be able to bring to bear their superior mobility and horsemanship in such hit-and-run conditions.

Of course that was the plan; the outcome was, sadly, much more mixed.

The invaders had taken casualties yes, and lost great horsemen--but in turn, their bows put down great Georgians, and further robbed Bagrat of the few men he had.

Even still, the Chagataids were quite bedevilled by the Georgians--but never enough to significantly delay them; delay the fall of Georgia, piece by piece. Small ambushes, and skirmishing, couldn't win a war of the likes the Georgians now faced--but it dragged things out, and Bagrat did succeed in ensuring that his men never wasted their lives; there was not an attack that he organised that cost him more in sheer men than the Chagataids during this period.

Ioannes, come the end of what had been a month-long hell of war, and death, with the start of April, had more than proven himself; drilling everyone he could in the tactics his great-grandfather, the Emperor Andronikos III, had codified for use against horse archers--and proving himself the undisputed leader of the Roman-Trapezuntine expedition through his able leadership and fierce prowess in battle.

His direct subordinates, the Roman Staurakios and the Trapezuntine Bardas were both uneasy though, despite every battle Ioannes led having been a victory; they were both veterans against the Ottomans--against Turks, and they made it quite clear that these foes they faced were superior to their Turkish archenemies in all ways; faster, yet more heavily armed--more disciplined, as if they fought on the Roman model of order, and organisation.

It was worrying, because Ioannes had noticed it too. He, a Prince of the Romans, was widely regarded within the realm as the greatest rider of the Balkans, and Anatolia--but these men they faced put him to the test each time he and his men rode out.

If he had had to work against instructors directly told to disregard his royalty, and honed brutally into the rider he was now--he could only wonder what hells each and every Chagataid soldier had gone through to garner the skill they had.

Bagrat's issues would not cease piling up, however; the Chagataids were on the move.

The invaders had suddenly--abruptly, left Samtskhe province, and pointed their lances and bows north-eastward at Kartli; joining the few detachments already there in quick order, and further consolidating.

This movement and consolidation could only mean one thing in Bagrat's eyes; they were going to raze the easternmost province of Kakheti--the literal breadbasket of Georgia, which had until now been largely untouched.

If it fell Georgia would not have it in her to keep fighting--there would be near-nothing left, and so Bagrat mustered every man he could and rushed; his plans simple--butcher the Chagataids piecemeal--before they could muster into a force too large for him to stop.

7,500 or so men rode into Kartli under Bagrat's banner, amongst them the 185 surviving allied detachment led by Ioannes.

Bagrat's scouts would, at this time, quickly report that several smaller detachments of Chagataids had recently merged and encircled Birtvisi Fortress; a vital fortress which lay 25 kilometres out westward of Tbilisi. It was well-provisioned and built upon a natural position; having been blockaded and then bypassed by the invaders during the previous year.

The Chagataids had done more this year; investing the environs of Birtvisi with a pinning force just large enough to keep the skeletal garrison force of the fortress at bay, although it was not large enough to truly lay siege to it.

That had, now, changed.

The invaders wanted it as a rallying point from which to maim Kakheti, and thereafter rally the Chagataid forces as a whole following the plundering and so forth in order to further brutalise Georgia.

Thus, in short, the exact type of target Bagrat had to hit if he wished to have any chance of surviving as the King of an actual realm once all was said and done.

Departing from their rally point of Kldekari Fortress on the morning of the 13th of April 1387, the Georgian army made the south-eastward march towards Birtvisi; a journey which would take a day and a half, and see them set up camp a short ways northeast away from Birtvisi.

The growing Chagataid camp, which the scouts estimated had 6,500 fighting men, and 300 or so men assigned to the siege engines, was about half-again as far from the Georgian camp as it was from Birtvisi.

Realising their chance was now, while they still had the numerical advantage, Bagrat ordered his forces to draw up, and arm, in the pre-dawn hours of the 17th of April; breaking his men up into three wings--the left led by his youngest Prince Konstantin, the right by his eldest Prince Giorgi and the centre by the King himself. Prince Ioannes, with his near-200-strong force, formed the core of, and led, a reserve force behind the King-led centre. At the fore stood a screen of light infantry.

Approaching, with caution, the Chagataid camp during the last hours of darkness before dawn, just as they had during the ambush of the 12,000 at Khunan, the Georgians would end up being outmanoeuvred; the Chagataids would not make the same mistake as they had with the 12,000 they'd lost--they'd earned from that costly lesson.

It'd been hidden scouts that had seen the encroaching Georgians--and rushed back, undetected, to forewarn their comrades; allowing the commander of the siege to wake up his men, and ready them--thus forcing Bagrat to fight enemies awake, and ready--not asleep.

Bagrat couldn't withdraw; not only would they lose Birtvisi, they would be allowing the Chagataids to rally their forces and thus rip away the one sure chance the Georgians had at striking a definitive blow--the Battle of Birtvisi would now commence.

Unusually, much of the Chagataid forces had dismounted, and stood ready to fight on foot, with it still unknown whether this was deliberate or due to the rush needed to awaken and ready them; some speculate that due to the battlefield being narrow, sandwiched as it was from the right by Birtvisi and the left by the Algeti River, that the Chagataids opted to avoid making use of what would thus be less effective horsemen in favour of infantry.

It could have also been as simple as the Chagataid siege commander wishing to rip away the ability of his men to flee on horseback--to force them to fight.

As dawn struck the Bagrat advanced his forces--and the Chagataid siege commander did likewise; neither side losing their nerve as they encroached, and encroached--until half the distance had been covered, and the Chagataids suddenly stopped; there was now enough distance between them and their siege camp, even as the Georgians kept advancing--steadily, as the fore elements of both began to skirmish with javelins and darts; this quickly turning into mutual arrowfire as they grew closer, and closer.

The Georgian light infantry didn't last--once the arrows came whistling in they were forced to retreat with heavy casualties, and in this, the Georgian forces surged forward--having been unmolested by the arrows at the expense of the light infantry; the Chagataids got off one more volley, before they were smashed into--melee commencing, as each wing one after another, a minute apart, came forth and joined the battle; stretching it out--and seeing the battle slowly but surely fall into a deadlock.

Neither had the advantage over the other and hours in the deadlock held--as only the reserve elements of each held away and lacked casualties.

Then roughly half of the Chagataid contingent which had been maintaining the siege engines, around 150 or so, came forth--a belated reinforcement, as they rode in to directly threaten the Georgian left flank. Of course, now no longer willing to sit in reserve, Prince Ioannes led his own forces, which outnumbered the reinforcements by a small margin, out; intercepting them and forcing the enemy back--an enemy who tried to bait Ioannes with a tardy withdrawal, which Ioannes refused; simply letting them flee while he rallied his infantry elements with his cavalry.

Once it was clear their feint had failed, the reinforcements came thundering back--holding their fire until they reached effective range this time, and being peppered for this by the Trapezuntine archers; confusing the targeting of the reinforcements--which Ioannes then used; rushing his cavalry forth and catching them while they were still reorienting against his infantry element.

Two dozen of the reinforcements littered the ground by the time they were forced to withdraw.

This continued--over, and over; the contingent refused to allow Ioannes to return to the wider battle--and they only ceased once 2/3rds of their number lay dead.

Ioannes, now with a moment to breathe, and collect information, found that the wider battle was going in the Georgian's favour; the Chagataids forced to create confusion with fierceness, before skilfully retreating while their enemies were recollecting themselves.

Bagrat had intended to surge forwards, and crush the Chagataids in their camp--but the sudden arrival of a barebones force from the Birtvisi garrison forced him to pause; a blessing in disguise--as it became known to him that the reason for this intrusion of his garrison was dire.

More Chagataids had arrived; thousands--the garrison had seen inklings of it and sent out scouts, who had now come to warn Bagrat; the enemy was within an hour of cutting off the Georgian escape route--and on their current path were set to plough right through the Georgian camp.

This news was bad enough--but the news that even further riders had been spotted across the Algeti River, at the portion of it where it straddled the Chagataid siege camp, and that these riders were not from the detachment seen by the garrison earlier, made it quite clear just how much peril they were in.

Had Bagrat charged into the enemy camp to crush them, as he'd planned, he and his men would have been cut off, outmanoeuvred, and killed, their victory ruined... now they had options, although not many.

The Georgian King would choose the option which would ensure he and his men could live to fight another day; they would break through the Chagataid siege camp, and make for safety behind Birtvisi's walls.

Of course, not only the Georgians had noticed the arrival of Chagataid reinforcements, and emboldened the detachment the Georgians had just beaten back sallied forth once more--Bagrat, his sons and Ioannes however rallied their men, and forced their way through--further, and further, even as casualties mounted; the siege commander correctly noting that if he kept the Georgians out of Birtvisi it would simply be a matter of rallying with the new arrivals to crush them.

The siege camp hadn't been designed to deal with threats from outside the fortress, only those coming from the fortress in force--thus the Georgians started breaking through--and rallied into columns as they rushed towards the rocky pathway that led up to the hill-top fortress.

Bagrat was however forced to acknowledge that a clean break just wasn't possible then, as the Chagataids refused to let the Georgians go; turning to his eldest Giorgi, who had taken to leading the rear of the column, and ordering him to lead a rearguard action to buy their men time, as he in turn then rallied his retinue and charged into the worsening foray--something Ioannes had already done with his own men, as the fighting turned into a brutal hand-to-hand melee.

Attempts to get away before the Chagatai reinforcements joined were starting to fail however, as the vanguards of both came thundering in--and were only repulsed with much blood from the Georgians, and aid from the remaining garrison of Birtvisi.

It'd taken that much to force the Chagatai back--but only those present; their comrades had bought the wider reinforcements time to arrive--and they had; Bagrat wounded in a duel against a Chagatai officer, and his armour broken--yet still he and his men fought.

Prince Konstantin, having rallied those not fighting at his father's orders, and against his own wishes, led everyone he could up and into the fortress; taking over the important duty of organising the inflow--lest it devolve into a stampede, or worse--congestion that would waste vital time.

From the walls of Birtvisi began to rain down Trapezuntine arrowfire shortly thereafter, as Ioannes had sent them ahead with Konstantin; giving cover--as the rest of the Georgian forces finally broke through the last of the siegeworks en masse, and made for the fortress--but the path was long, and uneasy, built as it was up the limestone cliffs of Algeti Gorge--the Chagataids still nipping at their heels despite the covering fire from the fortress itself.

The only saving grace was that the Chagataids themselves had to struggle past their own siegeworks now--just as the Georgians had had to, and thus couldn't rally in full force to storm the pathway and roll over the Georgians.

Taking over the rearguard from his eldest to cheers from his men, Bagrat would work with Giorgi, who refused to abandon his wounded father no matter what was said, to ensure that cohesion was kept on their end so as to make Konstanin's duties at the fore easier.

The Chagataids had fallen into making volleys of arrows, instead of rushing after the Georgians at this point--but this was all to buy time for their heavy cavalry, themselves just as skilled if not more so than their comrades with a bow, to equip and ready. Once the volleys finally abated they were replaced with the thunder of heavy Chagataid cavalry--who pushed through the semi-cleared palisades of the siegeworks and made for the exhausted rearguard of the Georgians.

It would be here that Bagrat V, King of Georgia, fell.

With lances readied, the Chagataid heavy cavalry had punched clean through the rearguard; unaffected by the arrows pelted at them--Bagrat tried to rally his disorganised forces, even as he himself was caught off-guard. The King would be attacked, as the heavy cavalry came back for another pass, by a Chagataid horseman--dodging a blow, and driving his sword into the face of another rider who came to aid his comrade.

But his armour was dented--and broken, and when the third came with a lance it went clean through the King, and sent him, and the broken lance-tip embedded in him, flying from his horse.

Giorgi, overcome with grief, yelled a denial--drawing attention to himself, even as he realised then that this was unwinnable; he would fight, and survive, to mourn and avenge his father--and so rallied the last of his broken men to the fortress--they would not die here.

The heavy cavalry was bogged down now--the second charge had been downhill, and thus more potent--but had also seen them overshoot, and now lose their formation, which gave the rearguard time to rush for the gates of Birtvisi.

Prince Ioannes would lead the first of the rearguard through the gates--having remarkably only lost 7 or so of his own forces in the battle--even as the Chagataids ordered their heavy cavalry back, and once more threw to the fore their dedicated horsearchers, who poured arrowfire up, and up, the pathway into the retreating rearguard.

The silver lining of having already lost so many men was that the evacuation into Birtvisi was quicker and easier than it otherwise would have been.

The Chagataids were gaining though, and many more Georgians died as they were so exhausted they couldn't raise their shields anymore against the arrowfire. Selfless, Giorgi rode and rallied--before his horse was killed under him, and the Prince forced to lift his shield as he directed his men to hurry--to move, move, move; he would be the last through the gates, as they closed.

Notions that he'd gotten through unscathed, as Konstantin or Ioannes had were short-lived--as it quickly became obvious he'd taken an arrow in the armpit earlier that had been driven in deeper upon being thrown from his horse... the Prince collapsed, and upon pulling open his armour all they found was blood--more, and more, of it, as it pooled within his gambeson; despite the best attempts of the surgeon Giorgi simply grew paler, and paler.

The arrow had nicked an artery--and blood had, since then, been pooling inside of him; he couldn't be saved and lapsed into unconsciousness and died little over an hour from the moment he was last through the gates of Birtivisi.

The Battle of Birtvisi is remembered as a doomed last gamble--a heroic one, that cost the Chagatai around 2,200 men by most accurate estimates, but the Georgians their King, and Crown-Prince.

Konstantin would thus be named Konstantin I, King of Georgia; the burden of leading a shattered Kingdom put on the shoulders of a boy barely entering adulthood--a boy lacking the familial support most would lean on in these times.
---
[1] Poti, a famous coastal city in Georgia that is closely tied to the events of Jason and the Argonauts, would later come to play a key role in Georgia come the future.
 
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