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Have any hurricanes hit New England (I'm assuming Galveston still got hit ITTL)?

BTW, I like reading about disasters...
 
Warren Truss currently serves as the Prime Minister of Australia after ousting sitting Prime Minister Pauline Hanson in a leadership spill after she quickly lost the faith and confidence of the Parliament with her policies and poor attempts to run the government. Surprisingly, the Australian Labor Party didn't win the election against the unpopular Nationals. The Liberals (centre) often elect several MPs, and sometimes form a coalition with Labour. Nick Xenophon currently leads the Liberals. Labor is lead by Julia Gillard, leader of the Opposition since 2014.

Helen Zille is the current Prime Minister of New Zealand. Born in South Africa, but her family managed to escape to Natal, where they then left for New Zealand. She is the leader of the National Party, forming a coalition government with the Maori party and New Zealand First. Their main electoral rivals are the Labour Party.

Pauline was PM, what on earth was that like and what did we do to deserve that?
 
Could we see a route map for New England Airlines?

YpJPR56l.jpg
 
Have any hurricanes hit New England (I'm assuming Galveston still got hit ITTL)?

BTW, I like reading about disasters...

Since history has no effect on storms, all storms are the same. The most recent storm was Superstorm Sandy, which brought major flooding to Long Island and Connecticut.

Pauline was PM, what on earth was that like and what did we do to deserve that?

As you can imagine, an unmitigated disaster. The Liberals never became the main centre-right party, and Hanson was much more effective in becoming high in the National leadership. She was able to lead a successful populist charge to win the leadership and an election, but it's then the wheels quickly came off the rails with her chaotic leadership, and extremely poor support among most Australians. She was deposed in a leadership spill just four months into her mandate.

How'd you make this map?

Great Circle Mapper
 
GsNvWFr.png


The 2015 Vermont General Election took place on 12 April 2015, and it saw the incumbent Union acadienne returned with a smaller minority than the previous election, this time only holding 14 out of the Assembly's 31 seats. The province is known to have one of the most unequal distributions of seats to the voting public, but this is due to the dynamic of Vermont politics, not poor drawing of electoral districts on the part of Elections New England.

The election did see the continued rise of the Vermont Party, which had previously held power throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Under leader Brian Dubhe, the party has expanded its voter base significantly, appealing to both English and French speakers. Social Credit saw its continued erosion of its share of the electorate in southern Vermont, with the party being increasingly confined to the northwestern section of the state, as it continues to becoming the party that appeals solely to the English-speaking inhabitants of the province.

Union acadienne, founded first as a fraternal organisation for preserving the Acadian identify in Vermont, exploded onto the political scene in the 1990s as a major force, and quickly found itself as the benefactor of an increased Acadian consciousness as the Francophone group across northern New England asserted themselves more and more. Despite holding a minority in Vermont, Union acadienne has managed to benefit from the collapse of the Vermont Party in the late 1990s as well as Social Credit's increasing appeal only to English speakers. The animosity between Social Credit and the Vermont Party have made any coalition between the two impossible, and the personal bitterness between Dubhe and Johnson have also ruled out any supply and confidence support for a minority government.

Thus, the arrangement continued with Union acadienne holding a minority of the votes with the plurality of the seats. What is known in Vermont politics as the "informal arrangement" holds Social Credit nor the Vermont Party will punish their MGA's (Member of the General Assembly) if they vote for Union acadienne bills. This policy was adopted out of necessity to accommodate the functioning of the Vermont government, its dysfunction in the early 2000s had seen the province lose residents in droves, as they set out for New Hampshire and Adirondack in record numbers.

Union acadienne has informal ties with the federal Parti Francophone, while Social Credit and Vermont do not have any ties with the other federal parties. The Vermont Labour Party, which is affiliated with the federal party, has not won a seat since the 1970s. The Conservatives have no affiliate in Vermont.
Amazing, how about P.E.I now?
 
Larry Craig...?
Still arrested in the bathroom, I presume.

You betcha.

ADS94, I was wondering, how do you draw up the riding borders for your election maps?

The first round of data gathering is done in Dave's Redistricting. This is how I obtained the borders for Adirondack, in fact. Once I have all of Dave's Redistricting numbers in my spreadsheet, I portion it out for each town & city. E.g. I will know the population of "CD1" in Adirondack, but also the population of Adirondack town. Each county is then added up and that's how I get my linguistic numbers, it's just a % of the county population. Since I have the population of every single municipality in New England (notwithstanding the Maritimes, that requires some more work) I just draw the borders from there to be (kinda) equalish. Since there's no VRA or any need to be hyper-focus on equality I give myself a +/- 2.5k voter per district margin for provincial-level ridings and a +/- 1.5k voter per district margin for federal-level ridings.

The actual construction of them is done using google sheets and photoshop. I don't rely on Dave's redistricting because, eventually, it's going to go away, in my view.
 
As you can imagine, an unmitigated disaster. The Liberals never became the main centre-right party, and Hanson was much more effective in becoming high in the National leadership. She was able to lead a successful populist charge to win the leadership and an election, but it's then the wheels quickly came off the rails with her chaotic leadership, and extremely poor support among most Australians. She was deposed in a leadership spill just four months into her mandate.

so Australia has more or less a 3 party system? Well i guess Truss isn't that bad if we're going to end up with a national party figure.
 

was guessing the coalition in 45 doesn't come into existence if the Libs are more centrist.

Correct me if i'm wrong but this tl, i'm making a few assumptions here but

Labor (Centre-Left to Left) - Gillard is leader and this is where she was trying to take the party in otl
Liberal (Centre to Centre Right) - Guessing they're smaller cause they're a city party mainly.
National (Right to Far-Right) - Sounds like what the nationals are now but bigger and probably encompasses social conservatives like Abbott, people concerned about regional issues like Barnaby and alt-right figures like Hanson.

At least this is my guess. I'm also guessing that these three parties hate each others guts.
 
was guessing the coalition in 45 doesn't come into existence if the Libs are more centrist.

Correct me if i'm wrong but this tl, i'm making a few assumptions here but

Labor (Centre-Left to Left) - Gillard is leader and this is where she was trying to take the party in otl
Liberal (Centre to Centre Right) - Guessing they're smaller cause they're a city party mainly.
National (Right to Far-Right) - Sounds like what the nationals are now but bigger and probably encompasses social conservatives like Abbott, people concerned about regional issues like Barnaby and alt-right figures like Hanson.

At least this is my guess. I'm also guessing that these three parties hate each others guts.

Yup! This is correct. It's a three party system. Most of Australia's social conservatives are with the Nationals and they've rebranded themselves as the party of the right wing and the more rural/suburban portions of the country. The party does have a streak of some left-wing economic sentiments/economic populism (for example, Bob Katter is a Nat).

The Liberals are the "safe choice" of a party for the metropolitan areas when Labour just doesn't cut it, as the Nationals message is DOA in the cities. It is not inconceivable in this TL to think of Turnbull and Shorten joining together to defeat legislation championed by Hanson and Abbott.

I'm sure the Nationals have roaped the really minor parties like the Motoring Enthusiasts and the Shooters, Fishers, and Farmers into the fold one way or the other, either through supply and confidence or official coalitions, be it at the state level or otherwise.

All in all, it makes Australian politics quite a bit wonky, and minority governments much more common, even with Australia's voting system, simply due to the fact the Nationals simply would never win enough votes to go down to the TPP level in the urban areas.
 
Just curious, what was the worst disaster in New England history?

(On a side note, though I like reading about disasters, I wouldn't want to be in one. My hometown narrowly escaped Harvey; several towns north and northeast of us were hard-hit, though (not to mention the flooding in Houston-Galveston)...)
 
Yup! This is correct. It's a three party system. Most of Australia's social conservatives are with the Nationals and they've rebranded themselves as the party of the right wing and the more rural/suburban portions of the country. The party does have a streak of some left-wing economic sentiments/economic populism (for example, Bob Katter is a Nat).

The Liberals are the "safe choice" of a party for the metropolitan areas when Labour just doesn't cut it, as the Nationals message is DOA in the cities. It is not inconceivable in this TL to think of Turnbull and Shorten joining together to defeat legislation championed by Hanson and Abbott.

I'm sure the Nationals have roaped the really minor parties like the Motoring Enthusiasts and the Shooters, Fishers, and Farmers into the fold one way or the other, either through supply and confidence or official coalitions, be it at the state level or otherwise.

All in all, it makes Australian politics quite a bit wonky, and minority governments much more common, even with Australia's voting system, simply due to the fact the Nationals simply would never win enough votes to go down to the TPP level in the urban areas.

interesting. How exactly did Hanson convince enough people to get into office on her own? Also any idea of the current makeup of the house of reps and senate in aus?

Also i know you said soccer in new england isn't big? is their any kind of league in any way (even an amateur one). Also what is their fifa ranking roughly?
 
Just curious, what was the worst disaster in New England history?

(On a side note, though I like reading about disasters, I wouldn't want to be in one. My hometown narrowly escaped Harvey; several towns north and northeast of us were hard-hit, though (not to mention the flooding in Houston-Galveston)...)

In terms of most memorable ones, you're looking at the Great Fire of Saint John, New Brunswick in 1877, the extremely deadly heatwave of 1911, as well as the RMS Titanic disaster, which sunk on its maden voyage to Brooklyn. The Flood of '55 also decimated the Naugatuck River Valley in Connecticut, as flooding swept away many downtown areas and destroyed factories. The Blizzard of 78 also paralysed southern New England, shutting down schools and businesses for days.

interesting. How exactly did Hanson convince enough people to get into office on her own? Also any idea of the current makeup of the house of reps and senate in aus?

Also i know you said soccer in new england isn't big? is their any kind of league in any way (even an amateur one). Also what is their fifa ranking roughly?

For Australia, the Nats have a minority government with supply and confidence from a few crossbench MPs. The Liberals have enough seats to deny them a majority, but also enough to ensure that Labor is not the majority party.

If I had to slap a guess on it, 65 National MPs, 50 Labor MPs, and 25 Liberal MPs, with 5 crossbenchers. Give or take +/- 3 from each party.

The Senate is a similar picture, but I would imagine with more crossbenchers and the Liberals and Labor more evenly matched with the Nats smaller.

As for Hanson, she won on a platform of economic anxiety, vilifying recent Korean and Vietnamese immigration as a danger to Australian society and pledging to stop the boats "forever." By beating the drum of Australian nationalism and stroking the fears that without strong leadership, Australia's mineral wealth would suddenly become worthless on the world stage due to Vietnamese businessmen buying up large swaths of territory in Western Australia and the Northern Territory. She won enough seats to become the largest party. After her disastrous Premiership she was forced out as leader, resigning her seat as well, which was won by Labor.

As for FIFA, New England has several minor leagues, but nothing is ever nationally televised. It's popular enough in Rhode Island and Plymouth with enough Portuguese immigrants that television stations offer some packages which televise the games. New England's FIFA ranking is around the high 40s, low 50s.
 
As for FIFA, New England has several minor leagues, but nothing is ever nationally televised. It's popular enough in Rhode Island and Plymouth with enough Portuguese immigrants that television stations offer some packages which televise the games. New England's FIFA ranking is around the high 40s, low 50s.

That's surprisingly good actually. For a country that doesn't have a professional league to be in the top 50 is nothing to be sneezed at.
 
You betcha.



The first round of data gathering is done in Dave's Redistricting. This is how I obtained the borders for Adirondack, in fact. Once I have all of Dave's Redistricting numbers in my spreadsheet, I portion it out for each town & city. E.g. I will know the population of "CD1" in Adirondack, but also the population of Adirondack town. Each county is then added up and that's how I get my linguistic numbers, it's just a % of the county population. Since I have the population of every single municipality in New England (notwithstanding the Maritimes, that requires some more work) I just draw the borders from there to be (kinda) equalish. Since there's no VRA or any need to be hyper-focus on equality I give myself a +/- 2.5k voter per district margin for provincial-level ridings and a +/- 1.5k voter per district margin for federal-level ridings.

The actual construction of them is done using google sheets and photoshop. I don't rely on Dave's redistricting because, eventually, it's going to go away, in my view.
wow, interesting
 
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