OTL Election maps resources thread

Thande

Donor
Nice work @kodak.

I, meanwhile, have reached the "Do not give a chuff" stage of covering the American primary season.


Yes I know Maine is 98% and the other 2% were probably eaten by Stephen King, it's the principle of the thing.


If stereotypes have taught me anything, they are probably all out getting legally high and/or being in South Park instead of counting votes.

@Utgard96 should have done a better job of civilising the savage inhabitants when he was out there.


Sanders certainly did better in county terms in Cali than in 2016. Though it would be nice if we had all the votes to confirm that.


Massachusetts isn't actually as bad as I thought, they've 'only' not counted the results in one town I think. It's just the aliens at the NYT decided to stop updating their live map with results from the AP for some inexplicable reason.

Fun fact: I had to add Buttigieg to the key because that one peninsular county (Gosnold?) had a three-way tie between him, Warren and Biden - three votes for each.

 
Clearly, they need to send the vote counters from South Carolina and Virginia to show Them Damn Yankees(TM)* how to count votes in an expedient manner.




*you know what I mean
 

Thande

Donor
Missouri primary, as they've counted first.


Many people may be disappointed that Michigan didn't back Sanders again, but you can't fault their organisation.


I keep finishing one map and then going back to the results to find one of the 99% reporting ones has clicked over to 100%. A Refreshing Change to waiting a week for it. Shame the primaries are probably effectively over now so there's little point in making more maps...


This is the worst political thing North Dakota has ever done, including that time their Governor tried to declare independence.


That's it for now as MS and WA are still counting.
 
By any chance is there a non-Wikipedia style map of the House of Commons constituencies post-1832 Great Reform Act here?
 
Notes on U.S. gubernatorial elections, 1841-1850

(Dark blue: Democratic hold. Light blue: Democratic gain. Dark yellow: Whig hold. Light yellow: Whig gain.)

1841

Starting position: Whig 15, Dem 11.

Successions pre-election
Michigan. 1841 Feb. J. Gordon (Whig) succeeded W. Woodbridge (Whig), resigned.
Virginia 1841 Mar. J. Patton (Whig) succeeded T. Gilmer (Whig), resigned.
Virginia. 1841 Mar. J. Rutherfoord (Dem) succeeded J. Patton (Whig), term as Executive Council president expired. Dem gain from Whig.

Starting position: Whig 14, Dem 12.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1841 Mar. J. Page (Dem) re-elected.
Connecticut. 1841 Apr. W. Ellsworth (Whig) re-elected.
Rhode Island. 1841 Apr. S. King (Whig) re-elected.
Alabama. 1841 Aug. B. Fitzpatrick (Dem) elected.
Tennessee. 1841 Aug. J. Jones (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Maine. 1841 Sep. J. Fairfield (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Vermont. 1841 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected C. Paine (Whig).
Georgia. 1841 Oct. C. McDonald (Dem-Union) re-elected as Dem.
Maryland. 1841 Oct. F. Thomas (Dem) elected.
New Jersey. 1841 Oct. W. Pennington (Whig) re-elected.
Massachusetts. 1841 Nov. J. Davis (Whig) re-elected.
Michigan. 1841 Nov. J. Barry (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Mississippi. 1841 Nov. T. Tucker (Dem) elected.
Pennsylvania. 1841 Nov. D. Porter (Dem) re-elected.

Closing position: Dem 13, Whig 13.



----------------------------------

1842

Starting position: Dem 13, Whig 13.

Successions pre-election
Virginia. 1842 Mar. J. Gregory (Whig) succeeded J. Rutherfoord (Dem), term as Executive Council president expired. Whig gain from Dem.

Starting position: Whig 14, Dem 12.

Elections
Virginia. 1842 Feb. Special. No election.
New Hampshire. 1842 Mar. H. Hubbard (Dem) elected.
Connecticut. 1842 Apr. No majority. Legislature elected C. Cleveland (Dem). Dem gain from Whig.
(Rhode Island. 1842 Apr. Dorrite election. T. Dorr (People’s) elected. Results rejected.)
Rhode Island. 1842 Apr. S. King (Whig) re-elected.
Louisiana. 1842 Jul. A. Mouton (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Illinois. 1842 Aug. T. Ford (Dem) elected.
North Carolina. 1842 Aug. J. Morehead (Whig) elected.
Maine. 1842 Sep. J. Fairfield (Dem) re-elected.
Vermont. 1842 Sep. C. Paine (Whig) re-elected.
New Jersey. 1842 Oct. W. Pennington (Whig) re-elected.
Ohio. 1842 Oct. W. Shannon (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Massachusetts. 1842 Nov. No majority. Legislature elected M. Morton (Dem). Dem gain from Whig.
New York. 1842 Nov. W. Bouck (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
South Carolina. 1842 Dec. J. Hammond (Dem) elected.
Virginia. 1842 Dec. J. McDowell (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.

Closing position: Dem 18, Whig 8.



----------------------------------

1843

Starting position: Dem 18, Whig 8.

Successions pre-election
Maine. 1843 Mar. E. Kavanagh (Dem) succeeded J. Fairfield (Dem), resigned.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1843 Mar. H. Hubbard (Dem) re-elected.
Connecticut. 1843 Apr. No majority. Legislature re-elected C. Cleveland (Dem).
Rhode Island. 1843 Apr. J. Fenner (Law & Order/Whig) elected. Law & Order gain from Whig.
Alabama. 1843 Aug. B. Fitzpatrick (Dem) re-elected.
Indiana. 1843 Aug. J. Whitcomb (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Tennessee. 1843 Aug. J. Jones (Whig) re-elected.
Maine. 1843 Sep. H. Anderson (Dem) elected.
Vermont. 1843 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected J. Mattocks (Whig).
Georgia. 1843 Oct. G. Crawford (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
New Jersey. 1843 Oct. D. Haines (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Massachusetts. 1843 Nov. No majority. Legislature elected G. Briggs (Whig). Whig gain from Dem.
Michigan. 1843 Nov. J. Barry (Dem) re-elected.
Mississippi. 1843 Nov. A. Brown (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 18, Whig 7, Law & Order 1.



Successions post-election
Maine. 1844 Jan. D. Dunn (Dem) succeeded E. Kavanagh (Dem), resigned. (Pre inauguration)
Maine. 1844 Jan. J. Dana (Dem) succeeded D. Dunn (Dem), resigned as House speaker. (Pre inauguration)

----------------------------------

1844

Starting position: Dem 18, Whig 7, Law & Order 1.

Successions pre-election
Missouri. 1844 Feb. M. Marmaduke (Dem) succeeded T. Reynolds (Dem), deceased.
Arkansas. 1844 Apr. S. Adams (Dem) succeeded A. Yell (Dem), resigned.
Ohio. 1844 Apr. T. Bartley (Dem) succeeded W. Shannon (Dem), resigned.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1844 Mar. J. Steele (Dem) elected.
Connecticut. 1844 Apr. No majority. Legislature elected R. Baldwin (Whig). Whig gain from Dem.
Rhode Island. 1844 Apr. J. Fenner (Law & Order/Whig) re-elected.
Kentucky. 1844 Aug. W. Owsley (Whig) elected.
Missouri. 1844 Aug. J. Edwards (Dem) elected.
North Carolina. 1844 Aug. W. Graham (Whig) elected.
Maine. 1844 Sep. H. Anderson (Dem) re-elected.
Vermont. 1844 Sep. W. Slade (Whig) elected.
Arkansas. 1844 Oct. T. Drew (Dem) elected.
Maryland. 1844 Oct. T. Pratt (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
New Jersey. 1844 Oct. C. Stratton (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Ohio. 1844 Oct. M. Bartley (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Delaware. 1844 Nov. T. Stockton (Whig) elected.
Massachusetts. 1844 Nov. G. Briggs (Whig) re-elected.
New York. 1844 Nov. S. Wright (Dem) elected.
Pennsylvania. 1844 Nov. F. Shunk (Dem) elected.
South Carolina. 1844 Dec. W. Aiken (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 14, Whig 11, Law & Order 1.



----------------------------------

1845

Starting position: Dem 14, Whig 11, Law & Order 1.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1845 Mar. J. Steele (Dem) re-elected.
Connecticut. 1845 Apr. R. Baldwin (Whig) re-elected.
Rhode Island. 1845 Apr. C. Jackson (Liberation/Whig) elected. Liberation gain from Law & Order.
Alabama. 1845 Aug. J. Martin (Ind) elected. Ind gain from Dem.
Tennessee. 1845 Aug. A. Brown (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Maine. 1845 Sep. H. Anderson (Dem) re-elected.
Vermont. 1845 Sep. No majority. Legislature re-elected W. Slade (Whig).
Florida. 1845 Oct. W. Moseley (Dem) elected. Dem win (New state).
Georgia. 1845 Oct. G. Crawford (Whig) re-elected.
Massachusetts. 1845 Nov. No majority. Legislature re-elected G. Briggs (Whig).
Michigan. 1845 Nov. A. Felch (Dem) elected.
Mississippi. 1845 Nov. A. Brown (Dem) re-elected.
Texas. 1845 Dec. J. Henderson (Dem) elected. Dem win. (New state).
Virginia. 1845 Dec. W. Smith (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 16, Whig 10, Liberation 1, Ind 1.


(Pale yellow: Ind gain - Alabama)

----------------------------------

1846

Starting position: Dem 16, Whig 10, Liberation 1, Ind 1.

Successions pre-election
Delaware. 1846 Mar. J. Maull (Whig) succeeded T. Stockton (Whig), deceased.
Delaware. 1846 May. W. Temple (Whig) succeeded J. Maull (Whig), deceased.

Elections
Louisiana. 1846 Jan. Special. I. Johnson (Dem) elected.
New Hampshire. 1846 Mar. No majority. Legislature elected A. Colby (Whig). Whig gain from Dem.
Connecticut. 1846 Apr. No majority. Legislature elected I. Toucey (Dem). Dem gain from Whig.
Rhode Island. 1846 Apr. No majority. Legislature elected B. Diman (Law & Order/Whig). Law & Order gain from Liberation.
Illinois. 1846 Aug. A. French (Dem) elected. Shortened term.
Indiana. 1846 Aug. J. Whitcomb (Dem) re-elected.
North Carolina. 1846 Aug. W. Graham (Whig) re-elected.
Maine. 1846 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected J. Dana (Dem).
Vermont. 1846 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected H. Eaton (Whig).
Iowa. 1846 Oct. A. Briggs (Dem) elected. Dem win (New state).
Ohio. 1846 Oct. W. Bebb (Whig) elected.
Delaware. 1846 Nov. Special. W. Tharp (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Massachusetts. 1846 Nov. G. Briggs (Whig) re-elected.
New York. 1846 Nov. J. Young (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
South Carolina. 1846 Dec. D. Johnson (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 17, Whig 10, Law & Order 1, Ind 1.



----------------------------------

1847

Starting position: Dem 17, Whig 10, Law & Order 1, Ind 1.

Successions pre-election
Michigan. 1847 Mar. W. Greenly (Dem) succeeded A. Felch (Dem), resigned.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1847 Mar. J. Williams (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Connecticut. 1847 Apr. C. Bissell (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Rhode Island. 1847 Apr. E. Harris (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Law & Order.
Alabama. 1847 Aug. R. Chapman (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Ind.
Tennessee. 1847 Aug. N. Brown (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Maine. 1847 Sep. J. Dana (Dem) re-elected.
Vermont. 1847 Sep. No majority. Legislature re-elected H. Eaton (Whig).
Georgia. 1847 Oct. G. Towns (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Maryland. 1847 Oct. P. Thomas (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Massachusetts. 1847 Nov. G. Briggs (Whig) re-elected.
Michigan. 1847 Nov. E. Ransom (Dem) elected.
Mississippi. 1847 Nov. J. Matthews (Dem) elected.
New Jersey. 1847 Nov. D. Haines (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Pennsylvania. 1847 Nov. F. Shunk (Dem) re-elected.
Texas. 1847 Nov. G. Wood (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 20, Whig 9.



----------------------------------

1848

Starting position: Dem 20, Whig 9.

Successions pre-election
Pennsylvania. 1848 Jul. W. Johnston (Whig) succeeded F. Shunk (Dem), resigned. Whig gain from Dem.

Starting position: Dem 19, Whig 10.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1848 Mar. J. Williams (Dem) re-elected.
Connecticut. 1848 Apr. C. Bissell (Whig) re-elected.
Rhode Island. 1848 Apr. E. Harris (Whig) re-elected.
Wisconsin. 1848 May. N. Dewey (Dem) elected. Dem win. (New state).
Kentucky. 1848 Aug. J. Crittenden (Whig) elected.
Missouri. 1848 Aug. A. King (Dem) elected.
North Carolina. 1848 Aug. C. Manly (Whig) elected.
Maine. 1848 Sep. No majority. Legislature re-elected J. Dana (Dem).
Vermont. 1848 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected C. Coolidge (Whig).
Arkansas. 1848 Oct. T. Drew (Dem) re-elected.
Florida. 1848 Oct. T. Brown (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Ohio. 1848 Oct. S. Ford (Whig) elected.
Illinois. 1848 Nov. A. French (Dem) re-elected.
Massachusetts. 1848 Nov. No majority. Legislature re-elected G. Briggs (Whig).
New York. 1848 Nov. H. Fish (Whig) elected.
Pennsylvania. 1848 Nov. Special. W. Johnston (Whig) elected in his own right.
South Carolina. 1848 Dec. W. Seabrook (Dem) elected.
Virginia. 1848 Dec. J. Floyd (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 19, Whig 11.



Successions post-election
Indiana. 1848 Dec. P. Dunning (Dem) succeeded J. Whitcomb (Dem), resigned.

----------------------------------

1849

Starting position: Dem 19, Whig 11.

Successions pre-election
Arkansas. 1849 Jan. R. Byrd (Dem) succeeded T. Drew (Dem), resigned.

Elections
Arkansas. 1849 Mar. Special. J. Roane (Dem) elected.
New Hampshire. 1849 Mar. S. Dinsmoor (Dem) elected.
Connecticut. 1849 Apr. No majority. Legislature elected J. Trumbull (Whig).
Rhode Island. 1849 Apr. H. Anthony (Whig) elected.
Alabama. 1849 Aug. H. Collier (Dem) elected.
Indiana. 1849 Aug. J. Wright (Dem) elected.
Tennessee. 1849 Aug. W. Trousdale (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Texas. 1849 Aug. P. Bell (Dem) elected.
Maine. 1849 Sep. J. Hubbard (Dem) elected.
Vermont. 1849 Sep. No majority. Legislature re-elected C. Coolidge (Whig).
Georgia. 1849 Oct. G. Towns (Dem) re-elected.
California. 1849 Nov. P. Burnett (Ind) elected. Ind win. (New state).
Louisiana. 1849 Nov. J. Walker (Dem) elected.
Massachusetts. 1849 Nov. No majority. Legislature re-elected G. Briggs (Whig).
Michigan. 1849 Nov. J. Barry (Dem) elected.
Mississippi. 1849 Nov. J. Quitman (Dem) elected.
Wisconsin. 1849 Nov. N. Dewey (Dem) re-elected.

Closing position: Dem 20, Whig 10, Ind 1.


(Pale yellow: Ind win - California)

----------------------------------

1850

Starting position: Dem 20, Whig 10, Ind 1.

Successions pre-election
Kentucky. 1850 Jul. J. Helm (Whig) succeeded J. Crittenden (Whig), resigned.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1850 Mar. S. Dinsmoor (Dem) re-elected.
Connecticut. 1850 Apr. No majority. Legislature elected T. Seymour (Dem). Dem gain from Whig.
Rhode Island. 1850 Apr. H. Anthony (Whig) re-elected.
Iowa. 1850 Aug. S. Hempstead (Dem) elected.
North Carolina. 1850 Aug. D. Reid (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Maine. 1850 Sep. J. Hubbard (Dem) re-elected. Extended term.
Vermont. 1850 Sep. C. Williams (Whig) elected.
Maryland. 1850 Oct. E. Lowe (Dem) elected.
Ohio. 1850 Oct. R. Wood (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Delaware. 1850 Nov. W. Ross (Dem) elected.
Massachusetts. 1850 Nov. No majority. Legislature elected G. Boutwell (Dem). Dem gain from Whig.
New Jersey. 1850 Nov. G. Fort (Dem) elected.
New York. 1850 Nov. W. Hunt (Whig) elected.
South Carolina. 1850 Dec. J. Means (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 24, Whig 6, Ind 1.



----------------------------------
 
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2016 Trump is the best Republican share of the vote since...



ie. dark grey - Romney 2012 did better than Trump
light grey - McCain 2008 did better than Trump; Romney did worse than Trump
crimson - Bush 2004 did better than Trump; McCain and Romney did worse than Trump
red - Bush 2000 did better than Trump; Bush 04, McCain and Romney did worse than Trump
...
lightest shade of purple (ie Western Pennsylvania) - Hoover 1928 did better than Trump; all Republican candidates since did worse than Trump
...
sky blue - Trump did better than anyone since Taft 1912 - possibly there were better R results before that.

This is share of the vote only, not margin over D.



I get the feeling that as one goes into the Mid West there will be a lot of light purple or sky blue counties. How many I can be bothered to do depends on how long the locdown lasts in my part of the world.
 
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So South Korea held her legislative elections yesterday amidst strict conditions owing to the COVID-19 outbreak that, luckily, is fairly under control in South Korea. So much so that the election saw the highest turnout for a legislative election since 1992 and the third highest overall since the beginning of the Sixth Republic. Of these, nearly half of all votes cast were casted before the actual poll day.

South Korea's National Assembly is a 300-seat, unicameral legislature. Until last year, it was elected by a parallel voting system where 47 of its members were elected by proportional representation and the remaining 253 from single-member constituencies in one round (FPTP). Starting with this year, the system is different: The 253 FPTP constituencies remain, but the remaining seats are now divided between 17 elected by proportional representation (5% threshold) and the remaining 30 are distributed proportionally as compensatory seats. It's a complicated system.

A party can't get into the compensatory seats if it hasn't gained either 5 single-member districts or 3% of the total list vote. The South Korean parties, to maximise their chances in the new system have created phantom parties - Together Citizens' Party for the Democrats and Future Korea Party for the United Future Party. These phantom parties ran in the PR election but not for the constituencies and viceversa.

The main parties running yesterday were the liberal, centre-left Democratic Party of Korea, the party of incumbent President Moon Jae-in; and the conservative United Future Party, led by Hwang Kyo-ahn. Rounding up the party are the small left-wing Justice Party, led by Sim Sang-jung, the centrist People's Party, led by Ahn Cheol-soo and the Open Democratic Party, led by Lee Keun-shik. The ODP is a split from the main DPK.

Since Korean parties have a habit of disappearing and re-emerging under different names, the UFP is the direct descendant of the Liberty Korea Party (2017-2020), the Saenuri Party (2012-17) and the Grand National Party (1997-2012). The Democrats in turn can trace their origin back to successive Democratic Parties since the year 2000 and ultimately to the 1955 Democratic Party, also a centre-left liberal party.

The result of the election was a landslide victory for the Democratic Party, which obtained a large and filibuster-proof legislative majority, the largest for a centre-left party since 1960 and the largest for any party since the return of democracy to South Korea in 1987. The DPK did so by sweeping nearly every seat in Seoul and the surrounding metropolitan area, which is home to half of the country's population, as well as retaining its support in the south-western greater Jeolla region. The conservative parties were essentially limited to the eastern half of the country and some affluents areas of south-eastern Seoul in and around the well-known Gangnam district and obtained their worst result ever.

Democratic: 180 seats (167 FPTP, 17 PR)
United Future: 103 seats (84 FPTP, 19 PR)
Justice: 6 seats (1 FPTP, 5 PR)
People's: 3 seats (all PR)
Open Democratic: 3 seats (all PR)
Independents: 5 (1 liberal, 4 conservative; all FPTP)

 
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After noticing a lack of high-detail maps of the Reichstag constituencies from the German Empire I set out to make one myself. I basically recreated this electoral map in higher detail using this highly detailed administrative map as my base and this period map as a reference. It's rough in some places since, though most of the constituencies follow first- or second-level administrative boundaries, not all of them do. I also had to construct the Hamburg and Berlin constituencies using descriptions from German Wikipedia and old maps of Berlin since I couldn't locate any maps of the constituencies themselves anywhere.

These constituencies were drawn up for the elections to the Reichstag of the North German Confederation in 1867 (constituencies for the southern states drawn for the Zollparlament election in 1868) and remained more or less unaltered until the dissolution of the German Empire in 1918. It's not hard to imagine how disproportionate the results of the elections became over time. The SPD, whose base was found amongst urban workers, were constantly underrepresented: in 1907 they won 29% of the vote, holding a 10% lead over the second largest party, but won only 11% of the seats - fourth place. When they finally won more seats than any other party for the first time in 1912, they won 35% of the vote with a staggering 19% lead over the second-placed Centre Party, but had only a narrow plurality of seats.



The map below is results for the 1912 federal election by voteshare, based on numbers from Wahlen in Deutschland in the provinces or administrative districts, where applicable, of each state (first-level divisions for the larger states, second-level for Prussia). These maps are fairly intuitive; darker shade means stronger voteshare. Stripes indicate that the party did not run candidates in any of that region's constituencies. The parties shown, are, from left to right: the Social Democratic Party, Centre Party, National Liberal Party in the top row, and the Progressive People's Party, German Conservative Party, and German Reich Party (Free Conservative Party) in the bottom row.

 
Building up from the 2020 map, the 2016 legislative election:

In 2016, Park Heun-hye was still president but the legislative election removed her legislative majority despite the divisions of the opposition. Which, did not seem so likely going into the electoral night for her right-wing Saenuri Party (Saenuri meaning 'new world'), the latest incarnation of the Grand National Party.

Indeed, the opposition Democratic Party was divided between rump Democratic Party, led Kim Chong-in, and the People's Party, led by Ahn Cheol-soo. The People's Party came about after Ahn Cheol-soo bolted from the party, taking with him a good chunk of the party's regional elites in the traditional heartland in Jeolla when Ahn's faction lost an internal power struggle to now-President Moon Jae-in. The PP was, it seems, to the right of the main DPK.

Then there was the Justice Party, led by Sim Sang-jung, a left-wing political party founded in 2012 by defectors from the Unified Progressive Party that took in voters from the Unified Progressive Party after it was banned in 2016 for alleged pro-North Korean views, as well as left-wing DPK voters.

Another change, besides the disunity of the opposition, was the changes to the electoral system. The South Korean Constitutional Court mandated in 2014 that the seats be reapportioned due to the gross disparities of voters per district. Even so, compared to British or American standards, the new rules for these constituencies were lax, quoting Wikipedia, constituencies "must not differ from each other by more than 2:1, and that the number of constituents in any given constituency must not differ from the average number of constituents by more than one third". Redistricting especially benefitted the Seoul metropolitan area, which gained 10 seats.

The results were unexpected, as polling had suggested a Saenuri majority owing to the opposition's divisions and the dominating national security theme during the election. But, instead, the DPK and the PP did particularly well in the constituency vote. Indeed, the DPK emerged as the largest party by a single seat, with the People's Party becoming a central kingmaker in the National Assembly thanks to its 38 seats (above party expectations). President Park would become a lame-duck president until her impeachment and removal in 2017.

Numbers:

Democratic Party: 37.0% (FPTP) & 25.5% (PR), 123 seats (110 FPTP, 13 PR)
Saenuri Party: 38.3% (FPTP) & 33.5% (PR), 122 seats (105 FPTP, 17 PR)
People's Party: 14.9% (FPTP) & 26.7% (PR), 38 seats (25 FPTP, 13 PR)
Justice Party: 1.6% (FPTP) & 7.2% (PR), 6 seats (2 FPTP, 4 PR)
Independents: 7.0% (FPTP), 11 seats (all FPTP)

The Democratic Party carried most of Seoul's and Gyeonggi's seats as well as in various other urban areas outside Jeolla (where it was a consistent second) and the conservative heartland of south-east Korea. The People's Party's strength was located mostly in the two Jeollan regions as well as the city of Gwangju, all traditional left-wing strongholds. Saenuri did best in rural seats, its south-eastern heartland and in the affluent areas of Seoul and its suburbs. The majority of independents were de-selected Saenuri candidates who defeated the party-endorsed candidates. There was one uncontested seat in this election, Tongyeong-Goseong.

On a personal note, this map was more fun to make than 2020, especially the FPTP constituencies, as it is more varied and not an endless sea of monocolourism for much of the country.

 
Last South Korean election for a while, the results from the 2018 Seoul Metropolitan Council election.

The Metropolitan Council is elected at the same time as the Metropolitan Mayor and the Education Superintendent. Incumbent Park Won-soon (DPK) was re-elected for a third and final term as mayor. The Council is elected in a similar fashion to the pre-2020 National Assembly, 100 seats are elected via single-round majority in uninominal constituencies (FPTP) and 10 members are elected via closed-list city-wide proportional representation with a 3% threshold in a parallel system.

The Democratic Party won in a major blowout thanks to the popularity of Mayor Park Won-soon but also to the deep divisions in the right between the right-wing Liberty Korea Party and the centre-right Bareunmirae Party (lit. "Righteous Future Party"), formed after the merger of the centre-right Bareun Party and the centrist People's Party (see above). As a result, the DPK gained 102 out of the 110 seats of the Metropolitan Council, an increase of 25 seats.

In many right-leaning seats, the Bareunmirae and Liberty Korea parties split the conservative vote almost perfectly, making the DPK victory much easier. The only areas where LKP candidates topped the polls - and barely so - were in the Gangnam district.

For the first time, the left-wing Justice Party entered the Council with one seat elected from the 10 proportional representation seats. The party didn't run any candidates at the constituency level, avoiding division on the left.

Results:

Democratic Party: 61.89% (FPTP) and 50.69% (PR) of the vote, 102 seats (97 FPTP, 5 PR)
Liberty Korea Party: 28.68% (FPTP) and 25.24% (PR) of the vote, 6 seats (3 FPTP, 3 PR)
Bareunmirae Party: 8.59% (FPTP) and 11.48% (PR) of the vote, 1 seat (PR only)
Justice Party: 9.69% of the vote (PR only), 1 seat (PR only)

The Bareunmirae counsellor is now a member of the Party for People's Livelihoods.

 
2016 Trump is the best Republican share of the vote since...



ie. dark grey - Romney 2012 did better than Trump
light grey - McCain 2008 did better than Trump; Romney did worse than Trump
crimson - Bush 2004 did better than Trump; McCain and Romney did worse than Trump
red - Bush 2000 did better than Trump; Bush 04, McCain and Romney did worse than Trump
...
lightest shade of purple (ie Western Pennsylvania) - Hoover 1928 did better than Trump; all Republican candidates since did worse than Trump
...
sky blue - Trump did better than anyone since Taft 1912 - possibly there were better R results before that.

This is share of the vote only, not margin over D.
 
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