OTL Election maps resources thread

With regards to why Beshear did so well in Eastern Kentucky, all I can figure is that those poor rural whites finally decided to vote their economic interests, likely because Bevin has made a big issue out of reversing the Medicaid expansion, and Beshear ran on an economically populist platform and didn't emphasize social issues much. overall Bevin lost because of his general unpopularity, but that alone wouldn't explain the swings in Coal Country.

And with regards to young whites in Mississippi, if I'm not mistaken they're far more Democratic than older whites - now whether that trend will continue or not remains to be seen, of course. even if young whites start voting like old whites, the state will still go Democratic in a couple decades or so once the non-white share of the electorate is closer to a majority, unless Republicans make dramatic gains with rural African-Americans, which I suppose could happen if we see college-educated whites become a Solidly Democratic group, but it's too soon to say.
Beshear also made excellent use of Rocky Adkins in Eastern Kentucky/coal country; Adkins swept the area in the primary but swiftly endorsed Beshear when he lost and spent basically every day telling voters in his region they needed to vote for Beshear, and cut an ad or two that were run out there. That freed Beshear up to campaign in the urban/suburban counties he desperately needed to turn out and swing in his direction to have a prayer. Sometimes smart campaigning means you use your surrogates instead of yourself where you're weak, not just in addition!
 
Template for Weimar-era Prussian state (Landtag) elections. The top shows the full seat distribution in every constituency, and the bottom shows the party winning a plurality in each constituency. I have complete maps for every free and fair Weimar-era Prussian election (1919, 1921, 1924, 1928, and 1932) on corresponding Wikipedia pages for them (hopefully they don't get deleted!) Due to the way the Weimar electoral system worked, there was no set number of seats for any constituency, so they varied from election to election, sometimes by a lot. This template uses the numbers from the 1932 election.

 
Template for Weimar-era Prussian state (Landtag) elections. The top shows the full seat distribution in every constituency, and the bottom shows the party winning a plurality in each constituency. I have complete maps for every free and fair Weimar-era Prussian election (1919, 1921, 1924, 1928, and 1932) on corresponding Wikipedia pages for them (hopefully they don't get deleted!) Due to the way the Weimar electoral system worked, there was no set number of seats for any constituency, so they varied from election to election, sometimes by a lot. This template uses the numbers from the 1932 election.

I need a reason to use this map!
 
As a follow up to the KY and MS governorship maps I did, here's Louisiana's runoff.

upload_2019-11-21_2-5-59.png


Like in Mississippi, energizing the black vote was obviously crucial to the Democrats' success, but something that's more interesting is that part of why John Bel Edwards managed to win re-election is in winning huge margins in a few crucial urban parishes that have been trending Democratic in Presidential contests, most obviously Caddo, Jefferson and East Baton Rouge, though Lake Charles' Calcasieu Parish is also notable for being more in line with the national urban trend towards the Democrats compared to places like Lafayette and Alexandria staying very Republican. As a result of these, it's probably Edwards doing well in the counties around Baton Rouge and New Orleans (not to mention those cities- Edwards got two-thirds of the vote in the former's parish and almost 90% of the vote in the latter!) that pushed him over the line.

What's interesting to me is how Edwards' victory marks an incumbent Democrat winning in a red state despite so many Senators falling to Republicans in the 2018 midterms, and I'm curious whether it's simply that Edwards is that much more conservative than they were (I know he's pro-life but given his well-publicized attempts to protect LGBT rights I'm not sure he has as much stake with social conservatives compared to, say, Kathleen Blanco) or that Democratic enthusiasm for the off-year elections is greater than Republican enthusiasm, whereas in 2018 it was fairly even.

Either way, for the first time since 1975 Louisiana will have a Democratic governor elected to two consecutive terms and for the first time since 1999 Democrats have won more of the gubernatorial races held the year prior to the presidential election than they've lost. Whether that will be a good omen for 2020 for them or not, it's hard to say at this stage...
 
Template for Weimar-era Prussian state (Landtag) elections. The top shows the full seat distribution in every constituency, and the bottom shows the party winning a plurality in each constituency. I have complete maps for every free and fair Weimar-era Prussian election (1919, 1921, 1924, 1928, and 1932) on corresponding Wikipedia pages for them (hopefully they don't get deleted!) Due to the way the Weimar electoral system worked, there was no set number of seats for any constituency, so they varied from election to election, sometimes by a lot. This template uses the numbers from the 1932 election.
Absolutely beautiful.

I took the liberty of adding links back and forth between these and the "Elections in the Free State of Prussia" page - if I knew how, I'd also have set up a template box for Prussian elections in line with the ones the modern German states have.
 


The Delaware State House election of 1938, the start of a Republican winning streak that would last through 1952.

Republicans: 21 seats, 57.15% among 34 candidates
Democrats: 14 seats, 41.16% among 33 candidates
Independent Republicans: 1.33% among 10 candidates
Prohibitionists: .21% among 8 candidates
National Pensioneers: .15% among 8 candidates


The results, by district, taken from various newspapers.
 
Some more Dutch electoral maps.

The People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD), h ad fairly even results throughout the country. The party's strongholds appear to be in the suburban areas of the country's large cities, in cities like Wassenaar, the wealthiest municipality to this day in the Netherlands, next to The Hague. The areas where it got the least percentage of votes were rural Limburg, in North Limburg.


These are the results of the Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP), the largest of the two Christian democratic protestant parties, the other being the CHU. In 1967, the party obtained 9.9% of the vote and 15 seats (out of 150). By the 1960s, the ARP was the more socially liberal of the two Calvinist parties. By the late 60s and early 70s, the younger generations of the ARP were marked by a preference for governing with SDAP rather than the other confessional parties, for instance.

The ARP was the party of one of the two main Calvinist churches in the Netherlands at the time, "Reformed Churches in the Netherlands", from the 1892 merger of two churches that had split from the main church - the Dutch Reformed Church. Coincidentally, it was also the church that would give birth to the SGP Calvinist theocrats, although the would-be SGP members split off in 1918.

Its voter base was primarily concentrated in the northern provinces of Frisia and Groningen, as well as in Zeeland and to a lesser degree in the areas North Brabant that were a part of Holland during the Dutch Republic.

 
As suggested elsewhere, here's individual candidate maps.

Note: the aliens at the NYT aren't bad, but the Grauniad's result page is much better, props to them.

Another note: I dub Adair County the weirdest in Iowa. Must be the result of the caucus system and no-hoper candidates having good speakers there. 18% for Gabbard (I think the only votes she got anywhere) and 10% for Steyer!

It might be helpful to specify these are SDE maps, since the first and final allocation maps look different by county.

Also, there were a number of tabulation errors (are probably still are) - but if you look at Adair County now, Gabbard got 0% on all three counts. Steyer got 3.5, 3.1, and 4.0% (for first allocation, initial allocation, and SDE respectively).

Yang did do decently above average in Adair, though.
 

Thande

Donor
It might be helpful to specify these are SDE maps, since the first and final allocation maps look different by county.

Also, there were a number of tabulation errors (are probably still are) - but if you look at Adair County now, Gabbard got 0% on all three counts. Steyer got 3.5, 3.1, and 4.0% (for first allocation, initial allocation, and SDE respectively).

Yang did do decently above average in Adair, though.
Thanks for clarifying that - I'm certainly not taking time to redo these, but it's worth knowing. Also it was pointed out on the twitters that I was quoting SDE figures on the second map, so I've clarified that in a follow-up.

Bring on New Hampshire, where their citizen advice website may sound like a terrorist group and their legislature may be a punchline, but at least they understand how numbers work.
 
Now that all the town results have been posted on NYT, here's my map. Didn't bother making separate color bars for Bloomberg in Dixville Notch or Warren (tied with Bernie) in Monroe.

NH 2020 Democratic Presidential Primary.png
 
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