OTL Election maps resources thread

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Thande, Sep 10, 2011.

  1. Lothal Lurkin'

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    Location:
    Maryland, USA
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    MD 2018 by precinct. Hogan in Red, Jealous in Blue.
     
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  2. Nunyabidness69 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2017
    Long time lurker, first time poster - Took a crack at my first election map, the most recent election for county legislature in Tompkins County, NY. This county in the Finger Lakes region of Upstate New York is notable for its numerous institutions of higher education, especially in the City of Ithaca, home to both Ithaca College and Cornell University. Thanks to this large university presence the county is very heavily Democratic, and it shows in the county legislature. Democrats won 11 of 14 seats to only 3 for the Republicans on the most rural fringes of the county. Of the 11 seats won by Democrats, 6 were unopposed, and of the 5 that were contested, only 1 was contested by a Republican (District 14 in the east, centered on Dryden). Of the 3 districts won by Republicans, only 1 was contested, District 6 in Lansing, which they won by about 8 points (by far the closest race in the county). Tomp_Elect_2017.png
     
  3. wolfhound817 Priest of Hank

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2018
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    If you want an upstate county with a landslide legislature, Schenectady only has one republican out of 15 (One Rep, 3 NY Conservatives, and 11 Dems)
     
  4. wolfhound817 Priest of Hank

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2018
    Location:
    Upstate New York
    Excuse me I was incorrect 2 Republicans, 3 Conservatives, and 10 Democrats
     
  5. Harlow Some kinda socialist

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2016
    Is there any resource to find province/county/state-level data for the European elections in all member-states? For instance, to make a map with this as the base: https://mapchart.net/europe-nuts2.html
     
  6. Alex Richards A mapper I, from near Dar-bai. Donor

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2009
    Location:
    Empire of Nova Elysium
    For Britain at least you'd have to add up all the individual council areas in each NUTS2 area as that was the counting division used.
     
  7. Ulster Fights, is occasionally Right

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Location:
    Clue's in the name...
    I've been doing some Northern Ireland local election maps recently.This necessitated having to make a map for the 1993 to 2011 boundaries, since an editable one didn't actually exist.

    Complete sets for every local election are done for the UUP, SDLP and Alliance Party. The maps are by no means one hundred percent accurate, in no small part because I can find no maps whatsoever for the 1973 to 1981 or 1985 to 1989 boundaries. The latter are almost identical to those of 1993 onwards (barring a couple of DEAs added or removed and a restructuring of Newtownabbey), but the 1973 to 81 maps are based mostly on guesswork for me (in that period DEAs didn't even have names, so it's a complete crapshoot as to whether 1981's DEAs A, B and C correspond to 1985's Victoria, Balmoral or Pottinger for instance).

    The UUP is also particularly tricky in the earlier elections. In 1973 things were still a little unstandardised (unsurprising given the party was used to complete and utter dominance for half a century, so this whole "actually having to fight competitive elections" thing was a bit new to them). So while many candidates were designated as UUP others were simply "Unionist". Sometimes these were counted in the final tallies as UUP seats but often they weren't (even if, four years later, a lot of them appeared again as UUP candidates). And that's without the other designations such as Non Party or Loyalist that some of them used. For simplicity's sake I am following ARK's lead and the map only shows those seats explicitly tallied as belonging to the UUP. Likewise in 1977 some of the party's candidates stood as joint UUUC/UUP candidates, often up against non-UUUC candidates from their own party. Again, only solely UUP councilors appear on the map.

    Sinn Fein, DUP and minor party maps will be along in the near future.

    I also have a few sets of maps focusing on last month's local election:

    Candidates in the 2019 local elections for all parties by DEA

    Gains and losses by the five main parties
    Minor party gains and losses
    First preference vote of the five main parties by DEA
    Party that got the most first preference votes by DEA
    Party of candidate that got the most first preference votes by DEA
    Increases and decreases in party first preference votes by DEA
    Largest party of each designation by DEA, and which designation got the most votes by DEA
     
  8. Nanwe Left-Macronista

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Location:
    Brussels, BE || Madrid, ES
    The last hurrah of Dutch pillarisation - the 1967 general election, with its 95% turnout.

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  9. Nanwe Left-Macronista

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2011
    Location:
    Brussels, BE || Madrid, ES
    Next up, the PvdA. Unlike other social democratic parties in Western Europe, the Labour Party (PvdA) was a newly-created entity in 1946, resulting from the merger of the SDAP, the interwar social democratic party and the VDB, a left-leaning liberal party. By 1967, the PvdA had been out of power for a decade with the exception of the brief Cals government (April 1965-November 1966). The PvdA Prime Minister, Willem Drees (1948-58) had been a very popular figure who, in coalition with the KVP built the Dutch welfare state. By 1967, the party had been going through some electoral decline and as a way to remedy it, it had begun to move towards New Left position to gain over young and female voters. Ultimately this pissed off the party's old guard that split off in 1970 to found the Democratic Socialists 1970 (DS'70), a new party led by Willem Drees Jr.

    The PvdA's result in 1967, when it only obtained 37 seats out of 150 was its worse electoral performance until 1994 when it obtained again 37 seats. To this day it's the party's 7th worse performance.

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    The Catholic People's Party (KVP) was the largest party in 1967, although much of its vote share was concentrated in the two Catholic-majority provinces of North Brabant and Limburg. The party was founded in 1946 as a successor to the Roman Catholic State Party (RKSP) of the interwar period. By 1967, the KVP had been consistently in government since 1945 in centre-left coalitions with the PvdA (1965-66), in centre-right ones with the ARP, CHU and VVD (1958-65, 1966-67) or in centrist ones with both the PvdA, CHU, ARP and/or VVD (1948-58). Internally by this point, the party was divided between two major wings, one closer to the Christian left and progressivism (that would split off in 1968 to found the PPR) and another more traditionally Christian democratic and closer to conservative positions. The 1967 elections represent the beginning of the decline of the Catholic bloc vote, as the KVP went from 30% to 26% of the vote and lost 8 seats.

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