Oh I Wish I Was in Dixie: A Different North America

2019 Crimean Presidential Election
2019 Crimean Presidential Election

In 1986, the Crimean SSR would gain its independence amid the collapse of the Soviet Union that same year. In its second presidential election in 1991, Crimea would elect Yuriy Meshkov of the right-wing Republican Party of Crimea to the first of his many terms in office. Meshkov would go on to win seven four-year terms in total from 1991 to 2015 with many international organizations liking the Crimean president to a dictator. Meshkov would base his support in the sizable Russian population of Crimea which makes up 48.9% of the country while Tartars and Ukrainians make up 26.4% and 21.1% respectively.

In 2019, Meshkov was expected to handily win his eighth term in power getting 57.9% in the first round of the election (in Crimea the top-two go on to the second round regardless if one gets above 50% or not). However, just one week before the second-round election, Meshkov would unexpectedly die sending the results of the election up in the air. In the end, Refat Chubarov of the centrist Civic Movement Party would narrowly defeat the deceased Meshkov to become the first president of Tartar descent.

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Linda Lingle
*I've made it this far without one, but oh well here's a pretty substantial retcon*

Linda Lingle

Linda Lingle is a Missouri politician currently serving as the 32nd Vice President of the Federated States of Dixie. Lingle is from St. Louis County, Missouri and in 1985, Lingle began her political career as a member of the Missouri House of Delegates, being elected to three, three-year terms in the chamber. In 1994, Lingle was elected as the County Executive of her native St. Louis County, and would serve one six-year term in that position. In 2000, Lingle would run in that year's gubernatorial election to replace term-limited governor Mel Carnahan (Missouri along with Arkansas and Mississippi are the only states to have a one-term limit for their governors like the presidency), but would narrowly lose to Bob Holden for the position. Because Lingle was from the more moderate end of her party, she would greatly upset many on the conservative wing of her party with her loss, and it was believed that Lingle's political career was over afterwards. However, in 2003, Lingle would run for the Dixie House of Delegate in the sixth district and would successfully primary Franc Flotron and win in the general election as well. Lingle would also serve three, three-year terms in the House of Delegates until in 2012 when she would run again for governor of Missouri.

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In 2012, Lingle would defeat State Senator Kenny Hulshof in the National primary and would face off against a fellow member of Congress from the 7th district, Russ Carnahan of the influential Missouri Carnahan family. Lingle would easily defeat Carnahan to be elected as the first woman governor of Missouri. Carnahan would go on to serve as Secretary of State under President Webb. After her election, Lingle would become a star in the National Party among its more moderate members and would become one of the party's biggest spokeswomen in the media.

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At the end of her single term as governor of Missouri, many thought that Lingle would use her position to jump to the presidency, but instead she would run for the vice presidency even though it had become an expectation that being senator is a necessary qualification for VP (as the VP serves as President of the Senate). Lingle would easily defeat Congressman Phil Roe of Tennessee, her only serious challenger, for the VP nomination. As the National Party candidate, Lingle would easily move onto the second round to face Virginia Senator Tim Kaine for the vice presidency. Despite Unionist Mitch Landrieu winning the presidency, Lingle was able to defeat Kaine narrowly to become the first female VP and the first National VP elected since 1982. Lingle is currently seen as her party's best chance in the 2024 Presidential Elections though the conservative wing of the Nationals have caused much trouble for Lingle in the Senate mostly led by Tennessee Senator Marsha Blackburn and freshman West Florida Senator Matt Gaetz.

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*For this just pretend it says Lingle instead of Haley.*
 
*I've made it this far without one, but oh well here's a pretty substantial retcon*

Linda Lingle

Linda Lingle is a Missouri politician currently serving as the 32nd Vice President of the Federated States of Dixie. Lingle is from St. Louis County, Missouri and in 1985, Lingle began her political career as a member of the Missouri House of Delegates, being elected to three, three-year terms in the chamber. In 1994, Lingle was elected as the County Executive of her native St. Louis County, and would serve one six-year term in that position. In 2000, Lingle would run in that year's gubernatorial election to replace term-limited governor Mel Carnahan (Missouri along with Arkansas and Mississippi are the only states to have a one-term limit for their governors like the presidency), but would narrowly lose to Bob Holden for the position. Because Lingle was from the more moderate end of her party, she would greatly upset many on the conservative wing of her party with her loss, and it was believed that Lingle's political career was over afterwards. However, in 2003, Lingle would run for the Dixie House of Delegate in the sixth district and would successfully primary Franc Flotron and win in the general election as well. Lingle would also serve three, three-year terms in the House of Delegates until in 2012 when she would run again for governor of Missouri.

View attachment 517999

In 2012, Lingle would defeat State Senator Kenny Hulshof in the National primary and would face off against a fellow member of Congress from the 7th district, Russ Carnahan of the influential Missouri Carnahan family. Lingle would easily defeat Carnahan to be elected as the first woman governor of Missouri. Carnahan would go on to serve as Secretary of State under President Webb. After her election, Lingle would become a star in the National Party among its more moderate members and would become one of the party's biggest spokeswomen in the media.

View attachment 517998

At the end of her single term as governor of Missouri, many thought that Lingle would use her position to jump to the presidency, but instead she would run for the vice presidency even though it had become an expectation that being senator is a necessary qualification for VP (as the VP serves as President of the Senate). Lingle would easily defeat Congressman Phil Roe of Tennessee, her only serious challenger, for the VP nomination. As the National Party candidate, Lingle would easily move onto the second round to face Virginia Senator Tim Kaine for the vice presidency. Despite Unionist Mitch Landrieu winning the presidency, Lingle was able to defeat Kaine narrowly to become the first female VP and the first National VP elected since 1982. Lingle is currently seen as her party's best chance in the 2024 Presidential Elections though the conservative wing of the Nationals have caused much trouble for Lingle in the Senate mostly led by Tennessee Senator Marsha Blackburn and freshman West Florida Senator Matt Gaetz.

View attachment 518000


*For this just pretend it says Lingle instead of Haley.*
Did Nikki Haley get retconned?
 
Did Nikki Haley get retconned?
Sadly yes, Haley is now still the governor of South Carolina rather than VP. I wanted there to be tension in the Nationals between the moderate and conservative factions, but that didn't make much sense with Haley as VP. So now Lingle fills that role as the moderate "establishment" head of the Nationals who angers the further right-wing members of her party.
 
Sadly yes, Haley is now still the governor of South Carolina rather than VP. I wanted there to be tension in the Nationals between the moderate and conservative factions, but that didn't make much sense with Haley as VP. So now Lingle fills that role as the moderate "establishment" head of the Nationals who angers the further right-wing members of her party.
Darn it. Oh well, I like this clash in the National Party
 
Apalachicola
Apalachicola
The State of Apalachicola is a proposed FSD state made up of areas in Northwestern Florida and Eastern West Florida where several attempts to separate from their respective states have taken place. These areas had long been very different than their states as a whole. In the late 19th century, they had been one of the breeding grounds for the Populist Movement, and in the 20th century, they had been a stronghold for the Socialist Party sending several of their members to Congress.

The Apalachicola movement would start in 1931 when a referendum in Florida to move the state's capital from Tallahassee in the Northwest to Jacksonville in the Northeast was successful. Shortly afterwards, citizens from Northwestern Florida would begin to drum up a movement to secede from Florida to create a new state. People from Eastern West Florida, who were also long unsatisfied with their state's politics, would join this movement to create a unified state between the two areas. In 1933, citizens from both areas would meet in Tallahassee to make plans for the new state. They would chose Apalachicola as the name for the state, after the river that forms the border of the two Floridas, and they would choose the old capital of Tallahassee as their new one. Their secession proposal would be submitted to the Florida House of Delegates, but would be firmly rejected in committee even by their local delegates. In West Florida, the proposal would never even come up for a vote. Since then, several county governments in the proposed state have sent secession declarations to their state officials, but all have been ignored.

Throughout the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the support for Apalachicolan secession continued. Since the 30's, the area has moderated in politics somewhat but is still dominated by the Unionist Party while Florida and West Florida have become National strongholds. In the 2012 presidential election, while Jim Webb was losing Florida and West Florida by double digits, he won the counties that make up Apalachicola by 23%. In 2015, a poll done by Florida State University would show that 38% of residents of Apalachicola supported secession while 44% rejected secession, the highest support a poll had ever shown in the area. In 2018, Andrew Gillum, the mayor of Tallahassee, came out in support of secession saying, "It has become incredibly clear that our state legislatures do not have our interests in mind, secession is undoubtedly our best option."

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Does Western Virginia have similar type movement as Apalachicola?
There was some support for partitioning Virginia in the early 19th century, but they never really got off the ground like in Apalachicola. The slight of moving the capital was what really set off the Apalachicola movement, and nothing like that ever sparked a widespread movement in Virginia.
 
Bloody Summer of 1915
The Bloody Summer of 1915
The Bloody Summer of 1915 was an armed insurrection of white Dixians in the summer of 1915 aimed primarily at putting an end to the newfound rights that Black Dixians had gained following the full abolition of slavery in 1899.

During the Populist Era (1886-1916), a widespread movement of social and political activism grew largely made up of poorer whites in Dixie with the aim to elevate their standard of living and to weaken the power of the wealthy landowners and businessmen. One of the main goals of the Populists of the era was the full abolition of slavery claiming that the practice damaged the wages that poor white farmers and factory workers could earn. Earlier efforts largely led by the National Party in the past had restricted it (such as Missouri's and Kentucky's ban on slavery in the 1870's), but those effort failed to fully end the practice. In 1899, Populist President Tom Watson of Georgia would be successful in passing the 12th amendment to the Dixie Constitution to completely abolish slavery, but the question remained as to what would happen with the now freed slaves in the country.

While the Democrats wanted Black Dixians to remain as second class citizens without voting rights, a large subsection of the Populists and many Nationals began advocating for the the freed slaves and the poor whites to ally politically to further their common interests. In several cities and states across the country, Populists helped to give Black Dixians the vote and formed coalitions with the parties and politicians they would elect. These coalitions were called the "Fusionists". The Fusionists began to take power in many areas of the country in the early 20th century, and were instrumental in the 1910 election of Populist President William Jennings Bryan of Missouri.

President Bryan was much more sympathetic to the Fusionists and giving voting rights to Black Dixians than any president before him, but the backlash to President Bryan's support was fierce. Reactionary violence in the form of lynchings and other intimidation techniques against black voters and their Fusionist allies ramped up considerably during this period. The Knights of Dixie, an organization formed to further white supremacy in Dixie, began to gain popularity in the country as well as other paramilitary organizations called the Blue Shirts. In the 1913 midterms, hundreds of reactionary whites were swept in to office across the country in a wave of race baiting propaganda. In 1915 this violence reached its peak.

On June 11, 1915, in Mobile, West Florida, the local chapter of the Knights of Dixie began rallying in the city after an ordinance passed by the Fusionist city government outlawed armed demonstrations at polling places. What first was a small rally however became a mod numbering in thousands that began rampaging through the city attacking black residents and destroying their homes and businesses. That night 11 black residents would be killed and dozens of homes and businesses were burned or vandalized. However, the violence did not end that night; it continued for several days afterward with groups killing nearly 200 and destroying huge swaths of the city. One of the white Fusionist city councilmen was also killed by the mob after he came out to try to settle them down. Black and Fusionist residents fled the city en mass to escape the bloodshed. Bryan on June 15 made his famous and consequential "Bloody Summer Address" where he announced that he planned on send in the army to quell the violence soon if the fighting did not halt quickly in Mobile, but this only multiplied the issue several times over.

Following Bryan's address, outraged white mobs led by the Knights of Dixie and the Blue Shirts began rising up and attacking Fusionists and Black Dixians wherever they held political power all across Dixie. Within a few weeks, the violence had taken over in almost every city with a Fusionist presence. In the state governments that the Fusionists controlled, the Fusionist politicians began to abandon their black allies to placate the reactionary mobs. The violence would continue for over two months before it would finally settle, but now many former Fusionist local governments were controlled by white supremacists. Bryan, faced with opposition from the federal government and the military he was commander of, never actually sent the army to stop riots anywhere.

The Populists were stunned and were divided with how to continue to operate, either by continuing to try and ally with the black population, or pandering to the white reactionaries to keep their goals. The Democrats, however, would beat them to the punch. With the Populists frozen with how to act, many Democratic leaders had begun co-opting Populist economic ideas and combined it with white supremacy to great success. Democrats such as Mississippi Senator James Vardaman, and Georgia Governor Woodrow Wilson used this combination as a way to attain huge popularity among white Dixians while the Populists faded into obscurity. In 1916, in the first direct popular vote for president and vice president (a central policy touted and passed by Bryan), Wilson and Vardaman would easily win election to the presidency and the vice presidency respectively. With this new regime in power, the federal government would be segregated and the states were given free reign to restrict voting access and segregate the black population at their will. The Exclusion Era had begun.

Bloody Summer.png
 
The Bloody Summer of 1915
The Bloody Summer of 1915 was an armed insurrection of white Dixians in the summer of 1915 aimed primarily at putting an end to the newfound rights that Black Dixians had gained following the full abolition of slavery in 1899.

During the Populist Era (1886-1916), a widespread movement of social and political activism grew largely made up of poorer whites in Dixie with the aim to elevate their standard of living and to weaken the power of the wealthy landowners and businessmen. One of the main goals of the Populists of the era was the full abolition of slavery claiming that the practice damaged the wages that poor white farmers and factory workers could earn. Earlier efforts largely led by the National Party in the past had restricted it (such as Missouri's and Kentucky's ban on slavery in the 1870's), but those effort failed to fully end the practice. In 1899, Populist President Tom Watson of Georgia would be successful in passing the 12th amendment to the Dixie Constitution to completely abolish slavery, but the question remained as to what would happen with the now freed slaves in the country.

While the Democrats wanted Black Dixians to remain as second class citizens without voting rights, a large subsection of the Populists and many Nationals began advocating for the the freed slaves and the poor whites to ally politically to further their common interests. In several cities and states across the country, Populists helped to give Black Dixians the vote and formed coalitions with the parties and politicians they would elect. These coalitions were called the "Fusionists". The Fusionists began to take power in many areas of the country in the early 20th century, and were instrumental in the 1910 election of Populist President William Jennings Bryan of Missouri.

President Bryan was much more sympathetic to the Fusionists and giving voting rights to Black Dixians than any president before him, but the backlash to President Bryan's support was fierce. Reactionary violence in the form of lynchings and other intimidation techniques against black voters and their Fusionist allies ramped up considerably during this period. The Knights of Dixie, an organization formed to further white supremacy in Dixie, began to gain popularity in the country as well as other paramilitary organizations called the Blue Shirts. In the 1913 midterms, hundreds of reactionary whites were swept in to office across the country in a wave of race baiting propaganda. In 1915 this violence reached its peak.

On June 11, 1915, in Mobile, West Florida, the local chapter of the Knights of Dixie began rallying in the city after an ordinance passed by the Fusionist city government outlawed armed demonstrations at polling places. What first was a small rally however became a mod numbering in thousands that began rampaging through the city attacking black residents and destroying their homes and businesses. That night 11 black residents would be killed and dozens of homes and businesses were burned or vandalized. However, the violence did not end that night; it continued for several days afterward with groups killing nearly 200 and destroying huge swaths of the city. One of the white Fusionist city councilmen was also killed by the mob after he came out to try to settle them down. Black and Fusionist residents fled the city en mass to escape the bloodshed. Bryan on June 15 made his famous and consequential "Bloody Summer Address" where he announced that he planned on send in the army to quell the violence soon if the fighting did not halt quickly in Mobile, but this only multiplied the issue several times over.

Following Bryan's address, outraged white mobs led by the Knights of Dixie and the Blue Shirts began rising up and attacking Fusionists and Black Dixians wherever they held political power all across Dixie. Within a few weeks, the violence had taken over in almost every city with a Fusionist presence. In the state governments that the Fusionists controlled, the Fusionist politicians began to abandon their black allies to placate the reactionary mobs. The violence would continue for over two months before it would finally settle, but now many former Fusionist local governments were controlled by white supremacists. Bryan, faced with opposition from the federal government and the military he was commander of, never actually sent the army to stop riots anywhere.

The Populists were stunned and were divided with how to continue to operate, either by continuing to try and ally with the black population, or pandering to the white reactionaries to keep their goals. The Democrats, however, would beat them to the punch. With the Populists frozen with how to act, many Democratic leaders had begun co-opting Populist economic ideas and combined it with white supremacy to great success. Democrats such as Mississippi Senator James Vardaman, and Georgia Governor Woodrow Wilson used this combination as a way to attain huge popularity among white Dixians while the Populists faded into obscurity. In 1916, in the first direct popular vote for president and vice president (a central policy touted and passed by Bryan), Wilson and Vardaman would easily win election to the presidency and the vice presidency respectively. With this new regime in power, the federal government would be segregated and the states were given free reign to restrict voting access and segregate the black population at their will. The Exclusion Era had begun.

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we all knew some form of this was gonna come
 
2019 Philippine Federal Election
2019 Philippine Federal Election
In 2019, the Philippine Federal Commonwealth held its 12th federal election since its achievement of sovereignty from the Japanese Empire in 1988. In 2018, Liberal Party Prime Minister Joseph Estrada, during his 3rd non-consecutive term as Prime Minister, was implicated in a multi-million dollar corruption scandal known as the Davao City Scandal. Jesse Robredo, a member of the Liberals at that time, led the intra-party campaign to oust Estrada from his postion, but after the effort failed, Robredo would leave the Liberal Party along with many other of Estrada's detractors to create the new National People's Party. In the 2019 election, the NPP would rocket to first place to secure a majority in the General Assembly, winning all but two of the nation's 12 provinces. The conservative Federal Democratic Party and National Party would both lose several seats in the NPP's rise. The left-wing Socialist Worker's Party and the Mindanao Liberation Front, which advocates for the independence of Mindanao, would also make gains in 2019.

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1916 Dixie Attorney General Election
1916 Dixie Attorney General Election
The 12th Amendment to the Dixie Constitution, passed in 1914 and a key Populist Party goal, changed the way that the President and Vice President were elected to a popular vote with 2 rounds and is still in effect today. But, the 14th Amendment also moved the Attorney General to Direct Popular Vote as well. In 1916, as most Populists were getting swept out of Congress and Democrats won the presidency and the vice presidency in the first nationwide popular vote held in Dixie, Senator Marion Butler of North Carolina narrowly won a six year term as the first directly elected Attorney General in the country.

Butler, now being the only Populist in power, Butler was left with little to no allies in Richmond. Butler would try to prosecute many of those that performed lynchings, but would quickly abandon his attempts early in his term after opposition from Congress and the executive. The friction between Butler and Wilson would heat up considerably. Butler throughout his term opened several investigations into Wilson administration officials; most notably in the State-Army Investigation, where many State and Army Dept. officials were investigated for an alleged embezzlement conspiracy. However, nothing ever came of the investigations and no indictments were made of Wilson Admin officials. In a few years, the President and Congress were completely over the Justice Department being completely independent of Congress and the Executive that, in 1920, they passed the 15th Amendment, which returned the Attorney General to appointment under the President. Butler would continue through his full term until his position was returned to the executive, and has remained the first and only elected Attorney General in the country's history.

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2018 Tennessee General Assembly Election
2018 Tennessee General Assembly Election
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In 2018, the unicameral Tennessee General Assembly (the only unicameral state legislature in Dixie) held elections for its 99 members. The incumbent National Party, while losing a handful of seats, was able to hold onto its majority in the General Assembly.

Incumbent Speaker Beth Harwell (N-Oak Hill) would leave her position in the assembly to run for governor and was able to successfully defeat incumbent National Governor Ron Ramsey in the primary and Unionist Delegate Craig Fitzhugh in the general election. After her successful election, she was replaced as Speaker by Bill Haslam (N-Knoxville).

The Unionist Party, led by Unionist Caucus Chair John Windle (U-Livingston), picked up 4 seats from the Nationals (the 34th, 53rd, 56th, and 73rd) and lost 1 to the Nationals (the 92nd).

The Social Democratic Party, led by SDP Caucus Chair Willie Harenton (SDP-Memphis), would fail to gain or lose any seats in the general election, but did gain the 96th district in a December 2017 special election after the incumbent Delegate Sara Kyle retired to successfully run for the Senate in 2018.
























2018 Election
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2018 Assembly by Party
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Assembly Districts #'ed
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