Parti Impérial: Big-tent party, whose main aim is the return of the House of Bonaparte to Auralia. Thrust into the position of kingmaker at the last election, they’ve been promised a referendum on the issue.
@KaiserEmu, why the Imperial party advocated to change the government to constitutional monarchy?
 
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@KaiserEmu, why the Imperial party advocated to change the government to constitutional monarchy?

The Imperial party gets it support from the significant Bonapartist community in Auralia, mostly descended from the Bonapartists deported from France in the 1820s and 30s. Somehow, they’ve survived the test of time and have remained a not insignificant political force over the last two centuries.
 
Ooh, questions!



The most likely candidates to replace Rudd are Treasurer Chris Bowen, Deputy Prime Minister Tanya Plibersek, and Foreign Minister Jacinda Ardern.

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Ardern would be my pick absolutely, the other two would be alright.
 
Wonderful update, it would be interesting to both have An imperial Auralia and a kingdom of France!

Was there a colonial war in costa Norte or was it mostly loyal like East Timor? Did the communist have a large influence in politics after its independance.

How did Alsace-Lorraine become a German majority? Looking at the timeline France gave it back during the alt-WW2... but Germany eventually lost, did they get it back after? IRL Alsace was already quite gallicised by 1940. Was the kingdom of France (? If it already existed at the time) less aggressive in their attempt to destroy regional sentiments?
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
A lot of it is based off source editing the text with the “inspect element” tool, then adding in images and cleaning it up later. I could do a more detailed tutorial if you’d like?

That would be great. Only if you've got time though!

Quebec is a republic, although there were some voices in favour of its adoption of the French monarchy at its (not entirely peaceful) independence.

Cool, it's a shame though - as a monarchical Quebec would have been interesting, especially if there was a resident monarch in North America...

New Holland is a unitary, parliamentary, republic. Its parliament is elected using STV by province. It’s government system, however, is closer to the US’s than Britain’s .

Kidulia is a unitary presidential republic. It does, however, afford significant autonomy to its large Aboriginal population and its small Dutch population, with 20 and two mandated seats in the National Assembly for the two groups, respectively. If not enough are elected at the election, extras are added in overhang seats. The National Assembly is elected proportionally, and the President is elected by a two-round system.

Costa Norte is a semi-presidential unitary republic. The most notable feature of its government system is its upper house, comprised of tribal chiefs from each Aboriginal nation.

Australasia is a federal, parliamentary, constitutional monarchy. Its system is fairly similar to OTL Australia, although its Senate is de jure appointed by provincial legislatures (de facto, six of the eight provinces allow the public to elect their senators). It also has designated seats for Indigenous Australasians.

Tasmania is a unitary parliamentary republic. Like OTL Ireland, but the President has even less power.

Auralia is a unitary presidential republic. Like OTL France, but the President has even more power.

Baudinia, as an overseas autonomous territory of France, is an autonomous constitutional monarchy, with the King represented by a Governor, and a unicameral Territorial Assembly.

Fascinating stuff :)

Can I ask why New Holland is a republic and doesn't share the Dutch monarch?
 
I just wanted to say that I love a good Australia-centric timeline (such as LORAG) and this feels really good, love the maps mate!
 
Wonderful update, it would be interesting to both have An imperial Auralia and a kingdom of France!

Indeed. That would be interesting!

Was there a colonial war in costa Norte or was it mostly loyal like East Timor? Did the communist have a large influence in politics after its independance.

There wasn't really a war, in that Costa Norte was a bit neglected in its development during the colonial era, preventing a significant revolutionary sentiment from arising there. Communists initially had a significant influence in Costa Norte, but Australasia, seeing the strategic importance of an allied nation to the north, provided significant aid to the country to further develop it and stave off the communist threat.

How did Alsace-Lorraine become a German majority? Looking at the timeline France gave it back during the alt-WW2... but Germany eventually lost, did they get it back after? IRL Alsace was already quite gallicised by 1940. Was the kingdom of France (? If it already existed at the time) less aggressive in their attempt to destroy regional sentiments?

The Kingdom of France was not much less aggressive in de-Germanising the region, but their annexation of the Saar and Palatinate threw a spanner in those works, with the presence of an additional 2 million Germans within their borders. Fearing separatists could take away not all their gains since WW1, they decided autonomy would be the best way to retain control of the whole region.

That would be great. Only if you've got time though!

I’ll see what I can do. :)

Cool, it's a shame though - as a monarchical Quebec would have been interesting, especially if there was a resident monarch in North America...

Can I ask why New Holland is a republic and doesn't share the Dutch monarch?

The reasons for both of these are due to their prior experience with monarchy, specifically the British monarchy. Quebec’s nasty experience with the British monarchy prompted a widespread view that it should be “Quebec for the Québécois”, which eventually prompted the decision for a republic. New Holland was very pro-monarchy early on, but significant Afrikaner migration after the Second Boer War prompted widespread prejudice against foreign monarchs. Instead they decided New Holland should be governed by a New Hollander.
Don’t worry though, there are lots of other monarchies!

I just wanted to say that I love a good Australia-centric timeline (such as LORAG) and this feels really good, love the maps mate!

Thanks for the vote of confidence!

I think Australia needs more AH attention, and hopefully this helps!
 
@Spens1, this should hopefully answer your question about the Australian Union.
It's my first wikibox (that I'm prepared to share)!
View attachment 420716

View attachment 420723

The Australian Union is an intergovernmental union of the nations of the Australian continent. The union currently has seven members - six sovereign nations and one autonomous entity - who cooperate on political and economic matters. Established in 1985 by the New Albion Accords, the Union was established to secure regional cooperation between the Australian nations at the height of the Silent War. Over the following decades, the Union has become closer together, including the adoption of a free trade area between the six nations, and moves toward a common currency, the Austral, expected to be progressively introduced from 2020. The French territory of Baudinia joined the Union in 2007 following a period of detente, although it has remained outside the free trade zone and future currency union. The Great Assembly of the Union is the legislative body of the organisation, which has few powers at present, but more powers are being transferred to the Union's elected body and its non-elected counterpart, the General Secretariat, each comprised of representatives of each member state. The economic benefits afforded by membership in the AU have prompted interest in further nations joining, with New Guinea and Papua undertaking the processes for admission, while Maluku, the Solomon Islands, East Timor and Vanuatu have all lodged applications for membership. Conversely, the desire for closer union between member states has prompted questions about Baudinia's membership as a non-sovereign entity. Some questions remain as to the exact role the Union will take in the Asia-Pacific region; whether a political union should be pursued, for example, but overall the Australian Union is a stable and prosperous entity.​

An EU-style Union in Oceania ITTL.
 
I’ve got some time on my hands at the moment, so is there anything specific you’d like to see?

I’m not quite sure what to do next - politics, history, elections, news etc; so I’d like to know what people want.
 
Further exploration on History would be great. Was there an attempted Japanese invasion during WW2 or was Japan not even a belligerent in that war?
 
I’d love to see more in depth information about either Kidulia (especially the relations between the Dutch and Indonesians) or Australasian New Zealand.
 
States of America
I was bored.

States.png



Further exploration on History would be great. Was there an attempted Japanese invasion during WW2 or was Japan not even a belligerent in that war?

Japan fought on the side of the Allies in the alt-WW2. There was no fighting on Australian soil during that conflict.

This is interesting. Watched. Also what's up with Patagonialand?

The Commonwealth of Patagonia is a Dominion similar to Canada or Australasia. It is notable for its significant Welsh-speaking population.

Is North America different?

See above. Yes, it is, although it's not my area of expertise.

I'll do some stuff about Australasia first (for @Unknown and @TheKutKu, then some global history for @SaveAtlacamani and @ZeSteel. After that I'll do Kidulia (which I've left till last because I want to do it really well).
 
How did America acquire the maritime provinces?

They voted for union after Quebec’s secession in the 70s, and all three became states in 1980. They do, however, retain many features of their original political systems - state politics remains between the Liberals and Conservatives, each of whom endorse a national party for federal positions. They’re also the only states to use a Westminster system of government.
 
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