"Now Blooms the Tudor Rose."

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Space Oddity, Jun 4, 2011.

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  1. Space Oddity That One Guy. You Know Who I Mean.

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    1545

    --Let's begin with Scotland. Things are double-plus ungood there. If people were interested in Mary Stuart's hand before, now that she's a bonified Queen--well, more or less--they're beating on the door. France suddenly finds itself deeply and intensely interested in reviving the Auld Alliance. Anne is sending Marie of Guise letters about Prince Edward, who is, as Anne tells it, so bright, and charming, and handsome, and desperately eager to meet young Mary. Even the Emperor is getting in on the act, wondering if the Queen of Scots would mind marrying one of his nephews--he can even try to make sure it's a handsome one! And naturally, all this foreign interest is turning Scotland into a nest of schemes, schemers, and their victims. A situation like this requires strong leadership from somewhere. Right now, it's not getting it.

    Obviously, young Mary, Queen of Scots isn't up to ruling the nation right now, as she's largely preoccupied with things like naptime, and running around in circles. That leaves the nation in the hands of the lords-selected regent, James Hamilton, the Earl of Arran, who is, by some counts, second in line for the throne, after Princess Antoinette. This is a problem--Arran is a man so devious, he regularly laps himself in his own schemes. He's also a Protestant, though much of his tendencies in that way are political--indeed, every aspect of Arran is political, based on what grants him the immediate advantage. That's Arran for you--an older man's cunning, blended with a younger man's need to aggrandize himself. In other words, pure unadulturated trouble. At the moment, he's head of the Protestant "English" faction, largely due to his ability to outmaneuver everyone else.

    But Arran's control of the nation is far from absolute. There's also Marie of Guise to deal with. Marie herself is a tough, capable woman and her brothers back in France are two of the most powerful men in the government. And so, despite the handicaps of being an outsider, a foreigner, and a woman, she's essentially become head of the Catholic "French" faction, though the fact that a good chunk of what used to be its leading lights are either dead or imprisoned has definitely helped. Both sides want to see young Mary wed to their respective "right" candidates, and Antoinette as well, if that's possible, with an alliance with the nation who will further their ends on top of it. The Guises, on top of that, want Mary (and ideally, Antoinette as well) spirited out of Scotland to the safety of France.

    Now, take a good look at all that, because by the end of the year, it's going to be completely messed up.

    --Emperor Charles is gritting his teeth, an act that his huge malformed jaw makes rather painful, so you can tell he's in a bad mood. And why shouldn't he be? While he's been planning a move against the Schmalkaldic League for some time, he was hoping to do it when he was rested up, and able to deal with these pesky Protestant Princes at his leisure. Instead thanks to one idiot dying inconveniently, and another idiot's need to grandstand, he's got them rising up while he's still preoccupied with Francois' latest attempt at glory. The League is assembling their troops, and he can't do ANYTHING except wave his fist at them, then go back to having his men make sure that France doesn't decide to come charging over the border again. His armies are battered, tired, and--oh, yes, he is once again skirting the edges of bankruptcy, while his loyal, but often testy Flemish subjects are coughing and gesturing towards Denmark. And so, Charles labors to end two wars so he can hopefully avoid a revolt, and go fight another war. Fun times.

    --Anne, Paulet, and Cromwell have produced a document supposedly made by Henry during one of his lucid moments which leaves the government on his death in the hands of Anne, acting as Regent, and a "council of worthy gentlemen" who will of course, give her the advice she will require as a frail and foolish woman. It is ever so slightly dubious, but quite frankly, there is only one man on the Privy Council who might just challenge it. Unfortunately, he's sitting in the North with an army.

    --The Schmalkaldic League assembles its forces in a fairly impressive rallying of the banners and sets out to attack Swabia under the leadership of the League's OTHER head, Philip of Hesse, he of the embarassing marital status. John Frederick sets out to join them, but winds up having to take a rain check when he discovers that Ferdinand of Bohemia is doing HIS OWN rallying of the banners for an attack on Saxony. It is, admittedly, less impressive, consisting of Ferdinand, Albert, Margrave of Brandenburg-Kulmbach, and Albert's best bud, Duke Maurice, who has reneged on his previous agreement and is just aching for another chance to settle the score. (Albert, like Maurice, is a Lutheran, but is exactly the sort of quarrelsome bastard you'd think would have Maurice as a friend, and thus is in this largely for the kicks.) Ferdinand also tried to get William, Duke of Bavaria into the act, but at the moment, he's doing his best to stay out of it. Still, it's a much larger army than Maurice's from last year, and Ferdinand feels it's enough to put the uppity Elector of Saxony in his place.

    He's wrong. The whole thing turns into a rout for Ferdinand's forces, as he proceeds to scurry back to Bohemia with what's left. Maurice is captured once again, and his best buddy Albert is captured with him. Both are released after swearing oaths not to take up arms against John Frederick--in Maurice's case, he winds up giving up another, LARGER chunk of his lands as the price of breaking his previous agreement. This time, John Frederick takes the time to send men to claim them, which keeps him from joining the League's army in Swabia.

    --Henry VIII finally dies, a man prematurely used up. Young Prince Henry is coronated, becoming Henry IX. He is eleven years old. Despite fears, the splendid ceremony goes on without a hitch, as London throngs cheer their charming boy-king. Henry IX inherits from his father an increasingly Protestant nation with ties to the northern German states and Denmark, a fairly bitter rivalry and cold war with the Hapsburgs, and a complex relationship with the Valois.

    --Francois, despite his recent setbacks, is overjoyed at finally being able to put the screws to the Emperor. He is already picturing his hero's welcome back in Paris, where he will arrive the conquering hero. It never happens. Francois, after a late dinner, goes to bed one night with a slight headache, and wakes up the next day on death's door. He dies in the afternoon, with his dear friend Cardinal Ippolito d'Este by his bedside. [1] This leaves the peace talks in the hands of France's new king, Henri II, and he is a different man than his father--less shrewd and more yielding. Charles is thus able to keep the peace deal from being quite embarassment it could have been, despite the fact that Henri does in fact, have him over a barrel. It's still quite bad--France's claims to the Duchy of Savoy are recognized, then granted to Henri's sister Marguerite, and almost half of Milan is handed over to them. (The actual title of Duke of Milan is left up in the air, to be handled in future discussions.) Further, Henri manages to flip the OLD Dukes of Savoy by engineering the marriage of his sister Marguerite to Emmanuel Philibert, thus neatly tying the two rival claims together, and leaving Charles with one less weapon to use against France in the next war, which is looking very much like a possibility.[2] As bad as all this is for Charles, it finally frees up some troops to deal with the Schmalkaldic League. Next year, he moves against them. For now, he orders an Imperial ban on John Frederick and Philip of Hesse for their numerous crimes against the Empire, notably the deposing of Henry, Duke of Brunswick-Luneburg.

    --In Swabia, the League's forces succeed in seizing control. Their spirits are greatly buoyed by their victory. They probably shouldn't be--in many respects, this campaign has been a debacle, with the Schmalkaldic League forces tripping all over themselves. Part of the problem is that the League's army has too many generals. Its nominal leader, Philip of Hesse is a walking embarassment factory, who was actually briefly forced out of the League despite being one of its founders. It'd be hard for any man to establish any sort of dominance in that situation, and Philip, whatever his virtues, is certainly not up to it. The result is the League forces tend to mill about, follow half-a-dozen plans simultaneously, take too long to acheive their objectives, and fail to gain full advantage from their victories. Of course, right now that doesn't matter, as they are facing fairly weak opponents. But once Emperor Charles gets his war on, they're going to be in trouble.

    --Peace is finally formally declared between Scotland and England, with Scotland formally apologizing for causing all this trouble, and agreeing to pay a suprisingly reasonable indemity. It's all part of Anne's charm barrage, where they will attempt to win the Scots over through the revolutionary tactic of being pleasant and respectful to them. Norfolk is ordered to disband his men, and return to London to take his rightful place in government. This is the moment of truth. If Norfolk decides to return to London at the head of an army, there's going to be trouble. Possibly even civil war. It all depends on his choice.

    Norfolk disbands his army and returns to London.

    --Diplomacy with Scotland gets tangled, thanks to a rather large number of factors. First, Anne's charm barrage begins as a three-pronged assault, aimed primarily at Arran and Marie of Guise. Arran is initially thought to be fairly simple to deal with--he is after all, half bought already. And yet Arran quickly proves more... unpredictable, and grasping than imagined. He essentially demands gifts and honors for taking England's part, especially on the marriage. Anne is understandably repulsed by this. Further, Arran is overestimating his pull. While Anne is aware of the advantages of keeping Scotland happy, on this issue, her Continental education is showing--Scotland remains for her a wild backwater, only of interest because it happens to share a border with England. It isn't worth paying Arran a fortune. Arran isn't half so clever as he imagines himself to be, but this doesn't mean he's an utter fool. He quickly realizes that England doesn't value him as much as he hoped it would and so starts quietly shopping around for a better offer.

    Relations with Marie on the other hand, are expected to be difficult, and thus treated with kid gloves to put her mind at ease. Marie responds warmly with pledges of gratitude and friendship. Admittedly, much of this is a ploy on Marie's part to strengthen her hand, but she does feel some kinship with Anne--in addition to the obvious similarities, both of them actually grew up in Francois' court. She also does what she can to widen the rift between Anne and Arran, and largely succeeds. The Guises seem to be very close to getting control of the situation, and achieving their goals.

    Then Francois I dies. And this changes everything. With Francois gone, relations with France proceed to thaw, especially when Henri has his first daughter, Elizabeth, and suddenly Anne's long-cherished dream of wedding Henry to a French Princess becomes... well, plausible. Suddenly, Scotland and its little Queen are a lot less important to France, especially if pursuing them means offending England, and a lot less important to England, if pursuing them means offending France.

    Marie is smart enough to realize this means that the 'spirit the Stuart girls away to France' plan is now massively impractical, and start planning accordingly. Her brothers also realize this, but they aren't sitting in the middle of Scotland surrounded by Protestants, and so they keep meddling. Marie obviously is, and is naturally worried--the third prong of England's charm offensive are the Protestant lords, and this one is working exactly as planned. And so, Marie begins to start improving her own relations with said lords, and starts hinting that having one of her girls marry Prince Edward seems... acceptable to her.

    Arran meanwhile, has found a patron who's willing to indulge him--the Guise brothers. And so, by the end of year, the leaders of the English and French factions have essentially switched sides. And things are only going to get more confusing.

    --Norfolk arrives in London, once again to plaudits of the people, and takes his seat on the Council. It's been a busy few years for him--he's spent his self-imposed exile from the court translating Orlando Innamorato, and having done that, was about to start on Orlando Furiso, but stopped. Working on Italian epics made him want to write his own, and so he's started work on a little thing called Brutus, based on bits of Geoffrey of Monmouth. He's really quite excited about it, and is willing read what he's got down to anyone who will listen.

    Norfolk's arrival coincides with the death of Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, another sign of the passing of the old order. As the Privy Council begins its Regency dance, factions form, and deals are made. And the first hints circulate that a new Convocation will be meeting next year...

    --The year continues to be one of mixed blessings for the Hapsburgs--Philip's new wife bears him a son, but dies in childbirth. The child, named Charles, after his grandfather, is small, sickly, and deformed. And yet, in what he himself will call the most surprising act he ever did, young Charles lives. Philip responds to the death of his wife as he will respond to the death of all his wives, by weeping and swearing he will never know joy again.

    Meanwhile, Emperor Charles finally gets peace with Denmark. He appreciates it.

    --As the year ends, Pope Paul III opens the Council of Mantua, which will set the stage for the Counter-Reformation to begin in earnest. [3] Paul's ability to resist the Emperor's efforts to move it to another more German city are another sign of the Hapsburgs weakening hold on northern Italy. Indeed, relations between Paul and Charles are fairly icy--Paul believes Charles to bear a fair portion of the blame in the whole English matter, and he is bitterly angry over the entire Reginald Pole affair, privately calling it a 'murder'. The two twin pillars of Catholicism are at odds. Even the failing health of Martin Luther can't overcome that bad news.

    -----------------------
    [1] He lasted a couple more years IOTL. ITTL, the extra campaigning has done him in.

    [2] They were married in 1559, IOTL, as a result of a different peace treaty.

    [3] IOTL, this was the Council of Trent.
     
  2. Historico Member

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    And so goes the 8th Henry, yet succeeded by the 9th. I have a feeling that you adhere to the Tudor tradition of the first born son not making past 16 lol? Since Anne had more of direct role in the creation of Henry's "Will" and probably his Act of Succession, could we get the definate list in whose in and whose out? All I know is expect to have a King Arthur I of the Fitzroy dyansty in a few decades lol...Keep it comming:D
     
  3. Elfwine Byzantophilic Brony

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    Habsburg, Habsburg!

    Well, more like Charles personally. The dynasty rising or not I am indifferent to, but TTL isn't altering my desire to see Charles, personally, have things actually work out.

    And it seems like for all the stress he's getting, he's not being handed problems entirely beyond his resources - though I shudder to think of the interest on the loans he needs to deal with the League.

    And good riddance to bad rubbish on Henry VIII.

    Fun story, this. :D
     
  4. stevep Member

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    Space Oddity

    Breaths large sigh of relief when Norfolk disbanded his army. You had me worried there for a while.

    Looking better for Charles V at the moment but he still has the League to handle and while the death of Francois has taken France off his back at the moment its likely to return while also its opened the way for a warming of Anglo-French relations. Not sure how effective John Frederick is as a commander but he seems to be pretty damned successful so if he takes over command in a crisis, or simply uses his own forces to attack into Bohemia after the latter's defeat it could be a problem.

    Hopefully England can have a period of stability now and some steady development.

    Scotland could well be a mess. It only needs something to happen to one of the princesses and people could start looking at Arran, or some other factor could start a messy civil war.

    The counter-reformation was fairly effective OTL but TTL it could be different with what might be an earlier 30 years war already kicking off.

    As you say Charles has been doing pretty well but he's got a lot of enemies. Can't be long before the Ottomans have another nibble and it sounds like the Dutch are getting a bit unhappy with the tax levels.

    Given that the Hapsburg's are still the main opponents to England and we have a Protestant monarchy are we starting to get the sea wolves sniffing around Spanish colonies and shipping? Or is Anne seeking to avoid things going that far in case the reaction is too violent?

    Is the Hapsburg Philip who's wife died the Spanish one who later became Philip II?

    Many thanks for continuing a fascinating TL.

    Steve
     
  5. SavoyTruffle Rabbit Tank

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    Things look even more interesting at this point. Charles alone is left of this interesting generation of Renaissance monarchs.
     
  6. Space Oddity That One Guy. You Know Who I Mean.

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    Ehh, more an earlier Schmalkaldic War. Though once again, notice the ominious 'first'...

    Yup. That's what happened IOTL.
     
  7. Space Oddity That One Guy. You Know Who I Mean.

    Joined:
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    1546

    --As the year begins, Martin Luther dies in Wittenberg. For John Frederick, it is a deeply emotional event. He immediately commissions a Life of Luther be written and printed, to inspire the faithful. More than ever, he feels the weight of his sacred duty to keep Luther's reformation alive. And so, as the First Schmalkaldic War begins to heat up, John Frederick prepares for battle. His first order of business-an invasion of Bohemia, to prevent Ferdinand from flanking him in the future.

    --In the ongoing effort to make the Scots forget several centuries of invasions, oppression and general troublemaking, the hostages taken in the raid are released, and sent back with several Scottish nobles who've been residing in England. Among them is Matthew Stewart, Earl of Lennox. Lennox is from a cadet branch of the great Stewart line, and by his count, he's the actual second in line for the throne, not that worm Arran. He's been sent with an understanding that he'll serve England's interests in the Scottish matter--however, Lennox, a dedicated Catholic, has no such intention. And Anne and her ministers are aware of this. Though Lennox doesn't realize it, the major reason he's been sent is so that he can start weakening Arran, allowing the Scottish Catholics to fall to intercine squabbling. Which he promptly does. He also, after making a play at Marie of Guise that goes nowhere, marries Lady Margaret Douglas, James V' half-sister, in a move that will strengthen his children's claim to the throne, and even give them a claim to the throne of England. It's enough to almost make Anne regret sending him back, if he weren't causing so much lovely havoc for Arran.

    --In London, the Convocation gathers. Right from the start, it's largely Cranmer's show, albeit with a significant role for his fellow reformers. It's also quite important. The Anglican Church is going to try and figure out what the hell it believes, aside from 'Shut up, Pope.'

    For roughly a decade, the English Reformation has been on autopilot. Henry VIII, surrounded by strong Reformers, and yet fairly conservative theologically, spent his time making vague noises about either taking things further, or scaling them back, but ultimately his occasional rulings and councils on the subject amounted to little more than reiterating that the government stood by the mildly Protestant Ten Articles. The result of this has been a church that, while largely Catholic in its ritual, is nebulously Protestant in spirit. Very nebulously--the Ten Articles are so constructed that virtually any sect of the rapidly increasing stripes of Protestant faith can get their hopes up. Add into a fairly open door policy, and England has become as one writer puts it, the great sanctuary for the Reformed Church. It is a heady place, where Lutherans, Calvinists, and even the occasional Anabaptist meet, discuss and debate with very little fear of somebody getting arrested and horribly executed. And this means that all sorts of ideas are just flying around. Now, as thrilling this is to England's religious intelligensia, it's just a tad worrying to its Church. Things like this happen long enough, and you've got a bunch of Melchiorites setting up shop and telling people that God wants them to abolish personal property, and hold women in common. Cramner and his friends are going to work to make sure that the Church is properly Protestant, and properly proper.

    But reining in the radicals is only part of the problem. They've also got to keep the more conservative members of the Church, especially as said members count men like Norfolk among them. While there's little worry of them screaming for a return to Mother Church--a decade of uprisings, Imperial meddling, and papal grandstanding have convinced even those of milder dispositons than Norfolk that the Reformers are definitely onto something as regards the Holy See's having lost sight of the True Faith--anything that deviates too far from Catholic tradition is going to upset them. The problem is figuring just where that point is, and staying within it. Personally, Cramner is hoping that at least some Protestantism has worn off on them. He has a wife and children he's had to keep in hiding for quite some time now, and it's getting annoying.

    --In Mantua, the Council is busily at work explaining just why the Reformers are wrong, the Church is right, and why the Pope is the head of the Church. It also works at taking care of the Reformer critques they actually take seriously, trying to cut down on the corruption in the Church.

    --The Imperial army sets out for Swabia under the leadership of Don Fernando Álvarez de Toledo y Pimentel, the Duke of Alba, one of Charles' most able commanders, and a bonified military genius. There in a series of vicious battles, it completely devestates the disorganized Schmalkaldic League troops. Many leaders are captured, including Philip of Hesse. Charles is thankful--and yet, the war is far from over. The League is wounded but not finished. The remnants are gathering, hoping to at least delay Charles progress--and John Frederick is still on the field. Indeed, his attack on Bohemia has been a success. Meeting a force lead by Ferdinand and his newly-minted in-law, William Duke of Bavaria--who has been lured out neutrality by both the marriage of his son to Ferdinand's daughter, AND the worrying fact that the Elector of Saxony has recently become his neighbor thanks to his conquests--John Frederick beat them soundly, and extracted their sworn vows' of neutrality. Then his army returned to Saxony, after engaging in some looting. Though Charles doesn't realize it, the mission has been a partial disappointment to the Elector--he'd hoped that Bohemia's sizable Protestant population would rise in his support. The fact that they have not is disheartening, as is the defeat of his allies. John Frederick is increasingly aware that the war must end soon if the League is to survive. As for Charles--his hopes of having his brother help him surround the Elector have been crushed.

    --The Convocation is not the only issue coming up for the Privy Council. They've got plenty of things to argue about--taxation reform, land issues, and the Irish. As always happens in these situations, the Council is divided into a shifting web of constantly shifting factions, with such old hands as William Paulet, William Paget, and the aging Thomas Cromwell cutting deals with or making moves against relative newcomers like John Dudley, the newly-minted Earl of Westmorland, and of course, dealing with perrenial wildcard, Henry Howard, the Duke of Norfolk. Even though his actual power is limited at the moment, Henry IX attends most Council meetings, at his mother's insistence. This adds another wrinkle to the various factional maneuvers--getting on the young King's good list. Presently, his mother naturally tops the list, but Norfolk has a surprising appeal to young Henry, with his flamboyant ways, military history, and of course, incredible facial hair. Further, they share a nephew they are both very fond of--young Arthur Fitzroy. Henry hopes to have Arthur and his brother Edward join them on the Council soon, even if, like him, they are basically given nominal authority.

    --In Scotland, a combination of Lennox's feud with Arran, and Arran's realization that the Guise brothers are basically promising everything while paying nothing, has split the Catholics in two. Lennox can be said to have seized control of the Catholic French party--but that is now the smaller faction, largely because it's waiting on the Guise brothers promise that Henri II will come around. Arran, and those who support him, are increasingly looking for some connection to the Hapsburgs. Needless to say, all this politicking is weakening Arran's position as Regent quite considerably--more nobles, whatever their religious beliefs, are favoring keeping good relations with England.

    --In Ireland, the O'Moore and O'Connor clans stage a raid on English holdings. The raid has its origins in a lot of things--Cromwell's continuing policy of surrender and regrant, England's efforts to force the Reformation down the Ireland's throat, a feeling that a boy king is something that can be exploited and a certain level of business as usual[1]. While it's hardly that unusual an occurance, this one is large enough to get some people a bit worried, and to make everyone interested in Ireland, including Anne who, truth be told, has never seen the island as that big a deal before. With relations with Scotland and France apparently warming, Ireland has suddenly become one of the biggest issues on the table...

    -----------------------------
    [1] IOTL, the clans started an uprising in the 1550s as a result of Queen Mary and King Philip creating a plantation on their land that required them to be... relocated.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2011
  8. Roisterer CMII

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    Great timeline. I'm learning a lot about sixteenth century history.

    Only one confusing thing:

    I know what you mean, but this reads like instructions for a map game :D

    Regards

    R
     
  9. Space Oddity That One Guy. You Know Who I Mean.

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    Well, thank you. As regards your point of confusion--yes, I know. But that's what happens when noble titles are the most distinctive thing about a person's name. One thing you realize doing this sort of timeline that as omnipresent as some names are today, it was worse back then. This is the story of an enormous number of men named Henry, Thomas, Edward, and when you cross over to the continent, Francis and Charles. As for the women, it's Mary, Anne and Catherine, with the occasional oddball mixed in there.

    And there's worse yet to come. John Frederick's sons are going to be an important feature in what's to come. They are John Frederick, John William, and... John Frederick. Yes, he named two of his sons after himself.
     
    Scholastique and What if like this.
  10. Elfwine Byzantophilic Brony

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    Now I feel better about the Byzantine custom where you name the oldest son after his grandfather.

    It makes it easier to follow. That, and surnames.

    John Frederick and sons are going to be lumped into the Saxon Prat (as Prat #1, #2, #3, and #4) category for the moment. Is that wrong of me? :D
     
  11. SavoyTruffle Rabbit Tank

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    Reminds me of the Danes who alternate between Fredericks and Christians.
     
  12. Space Oddity That One Guy. You Know Who I Mean.

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    Yes, thankfully, by the time they both get important, each John Frederick will have another title. So things should be generally managable.



    Most likely.
     
  13. Elfwine Byzantophilic Brony

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    Whew.

    Still. What kind of man names TWO sons after himself? One is bad enough.


    Any enemies of Charles can't be all good. :p
     
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  14. Thespitron 6000 Roman Cathode Deacon

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    Elfwine, I have two words for you: George Foreman.
     
  15. stevep Member

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    Especially when both are still alive. I thought at 1st Space Oddity meant he named one son after him and then when that one died named a later one to replace him. Must be bloody confusing in that household.:confused:

    Steve
     
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  16. Thespitron 6000 Roman Cathode Deacon

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    Yeah, we had that problem in my house with my brothers, Thespitron 5998 and Thespitron 5999.
     
  17. Space Oddity That One Guy. You Know Who I Mean.

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    I suspect nicknames were used. As for John Frederick--he does seem to have been a rather overwhelming personality. On the other hand, compared to his cousin Maurice, he's downright lovable. Then again, so are venomous reptiles.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2011
  18. Elfwine Byzantophilic Brony

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    The last good Saxon duke was...

    um...

    er...

    Okay, seriously, Saxons are trouble - speaking as an Imperialist (as in pro-HRE, not pro-region).
     
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  19. Space Oddity That One Guy. You Know Who I Mean.

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    Actually, most of the Albertine line stayed faithful to the Emperor, IOTL. Despite being pretty damn Lutheran. Fanatical loyalty to nearly everything BUT family seems to have been something of a Wettin trait, I'm afraid. Of course, that could always change...
     
  20. Roisterer CMII

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    Thanks :D You just made me choke on my cake.

    Perhaps ITTL we won't have to put up with long chains of Louis in France?

    R
     
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