Nobunaga’s Ambition Realized: Dawn of a New Rising Sun

I take that as Vigan being largely converted into a resource-extraction colony for gold, with the potential of fully commercializing the place as a trade centre largely being left neglected.

Moreover - I don't know how prioritising the island's military integration over political and economic concerns will end well, especially in regards to the ever-restive population of Pangasinan. It may as well make for a more Christian character for the highlands ITTL as a second-wave of Pangasinense's will sure make the trek upwards; even if it meant living with heathens and headhunters, at least some may make that choice over the prospect of living under the samurai boot.

All those rice and economic activity of that particular province are bound to be wasted in rebellions and pacification thanks to their increasing failures in integration.

In regards to Bireitou - I guess that those steps will contribute to the eventual dissolution of the Kingdom of Iriebashi Tatuturo and the further Japanisation of its natives, won't it?
 
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Oda nobutomo's death is defo a very important thing in Japan, and considering that Joseon, Japan, Russia and China (and Yuan warlords) are coming closer to each other I wonder when they'd have a scuffle and create spheres of influence in Eastern Siberia. Oda Nobutomo will have big shoes to fill. I think his reign will see colonisation and westernisation , japanising those things, and the creation of new concepts and material things be the focal point of Japan ittl.
I take that as Vigan being largely converted into a resource-extraction colony for gold, with the potential of fully commercializing the place as a trade centre largely being left neglected.
Considering that the only way to get the gold anywhere is by sea I think there'd be a port that would transition to become a trade port at the same time in reality.
 
Shouldn't there be a distinction made between the time periods before and after the Kanei reforms? While nothing much changed with the Oda chancellor's political control of the country, everything around him and his clan changed with it alongside the Furuwatari war.
The era before the Kanei Reforms is the early Azuchi period, but post-Kanei the government is still a chancellorste governed from Azuchi.
I take that as Vigan being largely converted into a resource-extraction colony for gold, with the potential of fully commercializing the place as a trade centre largely being left neglected.

Moreover - I don't know how prioritising the island's military integration over political and economic concerns will end well, especially in regards to the ever-restive population of Pangasinan. It may as well make for a more Christian character for the highlands ITTL as a second-wave of Pangasinense's will sure make the trek upwards; even if it meant living with heathens and headhunters, at least some may make that choice over the prospect of living under the samurai boot.

All those rice and economic activity of that particular province are bound to be wasted in rebellions and pacification thanks to their increasing failures in integration.

In regards to Bireitou - I guess that those steps will contribute to the eventual dissolution of the Kingdom of Iriebashi and the further Japanisation of its natives, won't it?
The highland chieftains were given political autonomy like the indigenous tribes were on Bireitou but with less interaction. They're pretty loyal actually because their new situation is better than the one they were in under the Spanish.

As for Bireitou, Tatuturo's fate is up in the air but yes to the latter.

Also Vigan has been renamed Bigan (美岸) ITTL.
 
What is the situation regarding buddhism and Christianity in china and Korea?

What is the difference between Yamato and normal Christianity? Maybe theologically they are expressing themselves through Buddhist epistemology and jesus as Bodhisattva?
 
You know, it would be amusing if the Yamoto Church made arrangements with the Anglican Church, to get their bishops 'properly' ordained, and get back into Apostolic Succession.
 
What is the situation regarding buddhism and Christianity in china and Korea?

What is the difference between Yamato and normal Christianity? Maybe theologically they are expressing themselves through Buddhist epistemology and jesus as Bodhisattva?
Buddhism and Christianity are about the same as IOTL in China and Korea.

Outside of not recognizing the pope in Rome, the Yamato church is very similar in doctrine to Catholicism. However, the liturgy is in Japanese and the hierarchy is a bit different. More in Chapter 76.
 
Korea was vary anti Christian and more influenced by Neo confucianism during this time period. Does treachery of Japanese Catholicism influenced them further to increase repression or empower various Buddhist organizations in their kingdom? With Russia slowly expanding in asia they must taken steps to deal with it. They have example of japan after all.

Is there any Japanese travellers visiting west other than as ambassador? I am wondering how west will view buddhism?
 
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Korea was vary anti Christian and more influenced by Neo confucianism during this time period. Does treachery of Japanese Catholicism influenced them further to increase repression or empower various Buddhist organizations in their kingdom? With Russia slowly expanding in asia they must taken steps to deal with it. They have example of japan after all.

Is there any Japanese travellers visiting west other than as ambassador? I am wondering how west will view buddhism?
So neo-Confucianism has lessened influence in Joseon ITTL because of the reforms of Gwanghaegun ITTL. Outside of that, there hasn't been a counter-reaction on a philosophical or theological level in the peninsula. Christianity is still completely banned tho.

Europe is far so not yet.
 
Map of Daimyo 1649

Map of Daimyo 1649


1684679454469.png

  1. Kakizaki Takahiro (柿崎高広): 1643-​
  2. Tsugaru Nobuhide (津軽信英): 1620-​
  3. Nanbu Shigenao (南部重直): 1606-​
  4. Akita Toshisue (秋田俊季): 1598-​
  5. Mōri Tadakatsu (毛利忠勝): 1594-​
  6. Tozawa Masanobu (戸沢正誠): 1640-​
  7. Endou Tsunetomo (遠藤常友): 1628-​
  8. Kyogoku Takahiro (京極高広): 1599-​
  9. Sakuma Moritora (佐久間盛虎): 1619-​
  10. Tooyama Tomosada (遠山友貞): 1641-​
  11. Date Norimune (伊達則宗): 1600-​
  12. Souma Tomotane (相馬朝胤): 1619-​
  13. Shirakawa Yoshizane (白河義実): 1617-​
  14. Mogami Yoshisato (最上義智): 1631-​
  15. Satake Yoshitaka (佐竹義隆): 1609-​
  16. Utsunomiya Yoshitsuna (宇都宮義綱): 1598-​
  17. Sano Hisatsuna (佐野久綱): 1600-​
  18. Oyama Toshitsune (小山利恒) 1595-​
  19. Minagawa Hidetaka (皆川秀隆): 1626-​
  20. Hasegawa Hidemasa (長谷川秀昌): 1600-​
  21. Ikoma Takatoshi (生駒高俊): 1611-​
  22. Date Tadamune (伊達忠宗): 1591-​
  23. Uesugi Norikuni (上杉憲国): 1589-​
  24. Satomi Toshiteru (里見利輝): 1618-​
  25. Musashino Toshinao (武蔵野利直): 1618-
  26. Takigawa Kazutoshi (滝川一利): 1583-​
  27. Murai Sadayoshi (村井貞能): 1611-​
  28. Oota Nobufusa (太田資房): 1623-​
  29. Tokugawa Tadayasu (徳川忠康): 1595-​
  30. Hisamatsu Tadatoshi (久松忠利): 1605-​
  31. Kawajiri Shigenori (河尻鎮則): 1607-​
  32. Inaba Nobumichi (稲葉信通): 1608-​
  33. Mizuno Katsutoshi (水野勝俊): 1598-​
  34. Kiso Yoshihiro (木曾義廣): 1621-​
  35. Mori Tomoyoshi (森朝可): 1626-​
  36. Oda Tomoaki (織田朝昭): 1608-
  37. Gamou Noriharu (蒲生則治): 1614-​
  38. Nagao Kagemitsu (長尾景光): 1608-​
  39. Sassa Katsutoyo (佐々勝豊): 1635-​
  40. Maeda Noriyuki (前田則之): 1604-​
  41. Shibata Katsuoki (柴田勝興): 1612-​
  42. Anekouji Noritsuna (姉小路則綱): 1608-​
  43. Oda Nobutsugu (織田信嗣): 1622-
  44. Kudō Kanetada (工藤包忠): 1597-
  45. Kitabatake Tomotoyo (北畠具豊): 1625-
  46. Kuki Takasue (九鬼隆季): 1608-​
  47. Seki Naritsugu (関成次): 1582-​
  48. Mori Tadamine (森忠峯) 1596-​
  49. Asano Noriakira (浅野則晟): 1617-​
  50. Nagaoka Tomotoshi (長岡朝利): 1619-​
  51. Niwa Tomoshige (丹羽朝重): 1622-​
  52. Akechi Mitsutada (明智光忠): 1591-​
  53. Ikeda Yoshinori (池田由則): 1605-​
  54. Takayama Norifusa (高山則房): 1610-​
  55. Nakagawa Hisamori (中川久盛): 1594-​
  56. Hashiba Hidemitsu (羽柴秀三): 1610-​
  57. Miyabe Nagayuki (宮部長之): 1607-​
  58. Ukita Nobuie (宇喜多信家): 1572-​
  59. Nanjou Muneharu (南条宗晴): 1608-​
  60. Horio Yasunaga (堀尾泰長): 1610-​
  61. Ban Tomoharu (塙友治): 1592-​
  62. Amago Norihisa (尼子則久): 1618-​
  63. Urakusai Nagaie (有楽斎長家): 1604-
  64. Hachisuka Noriteru (蜂須賀則英): 1611-​
  65. Itou Sukehisa (伊東祐久): 1609-​
  66. Kuroda Noriyuki (黒田則之): 1602-​
  67. Mōri Tadamoto (毛利忠元): 1595-​
  68. Miyoshi Yasunori (三好康則): 1606-
  69. Sogo Masanori (十河存則): 1608-​
  70. Kawano Michitomo (河野通朝): 1618-​
  71. Chosokabe Tadachika (長宗我部忠親): 1591-​
  72. Saionji Kinnori (西園寺公則): 1613-
  73. Otomo Yoshitaka (大友義孝): 1641-​
  74. Ryuzōji Noriie (龍造寺則家) 1605-​
  75. Matsura Shigenobu (松浦重信): 1622-​
  76. Sou Yoshinari (宗義成): 1604-​
  77. Hori Chikamasa (堀親昌): 1606-​
  78. Tachibana Tanenaga (立花種長): 1625-​
  79. Horiuchi Ujihisa (堀内氏久): 1597-​
  80. Shimazu Norihisa (島津則久): 1613-

[1]: The entirety of Kawachi province was annexed as Oda-Azuchi land after Murai Sadamasa’s fief was switched to Sagami province.

Bolded orange= Oda clan members
 
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Chapter 74: Map of Daimyo 1649

...
I can barely imagine the research need to generate this...

Some analysis:
The 80 men on this list have 77 different given names. The dupes are

Maeda Noriyuki and Kuroda Noriyuki
Kakizaki Takahiro and Kyogoku Takahiro
Satake Yoshitaka and Otomo Yoshitaka

A huge contrast with Europe, where almost every scenario is cluttered with hordes of Charleses and Johns and Louises.

The oldest is 77 (Ukita Nobuie); the youngest is 6 (Kakizaki Takahiro). There are five minors (aged 6, 8, 9, 14, 18?). Median age is 41.
 
I can barely imagine the research need to generate this...

Some analysis:
The 80 men on this list have 77 different given names. The dupes are

Maeda Noriyuki and Kuroda Noriyuki
Kakizaki Takahiro and Kyogoku Takahiro
Satake Yoshitaka and Otomo Yoshitaka

A huge contrast with Europe, where almost every scenario is cluttered with hordes of Charleses and Johns and Louises.

The oldest is 77 (Ukita Nobuie); the youngest is 6 (Kakizaki Takahiro). There are five minors (aged 6, 8, 9, 14, 18?). Median age is 41.
Honestly these posts are kinda crazy to put together. Just in terms of the names, differences range from taking up a different sovereign’s character (則or朝 vs 忠or光) to a different son succeeding (The Date Tadamune of TTL is Masamune’s first son whereas the Tadamune of OTL is Masamune’s second more legitimate son). Not to mention all the clans that don’t exist IOTL like the Murai and Akechi clans. Many of the ppl though are the same but with different territories. And all the dupes are pure coincidences.

Thank you for the analysis btw, it’s pretty cool what you did. I thought the median age would skew younger. There must be a disproportionate number of lords in their 40s and 50s then.
 
Chapter 72: New Sweden and New Holland

Chapter 72: New Sweden and New Holland

After the Peace of Prague in 1635, Sweden was at its greatest apex seen yet in terms of power, territory, and prestige. Not only had King Gustavus Adolphus triumphed as the champion of the Protestant cause but he had also become a direct player in imperial affairs as both the holder of northern German lands and as a guarantor of the treaty. An exhausted but proud Gustavus returned to Stockholm to be greeted by jubilant crowds and his own family, whom he had been away from for years. The next few years would see a period of unassuming calm in the realm, the king finally resolving his lack of a legitimate male heir with the birth of John Sigismund in 1637, the future John IV Sigismund.

Shortly after his birth, however, the Swedish king would endeavor upon his reign’s other big legacy: the beginning of Swedish colonial and maritime expansion. In 1635, right after the finalization of the Peace of Prague, the Treaty of Stuhmsdorf was signed to extend the 1629 Truce of Altmark despite Polish king Wladyslaw IV’s desire to renew conflict with the Scandinavian power, which saw the continuation of Sweden’s right to collect tariffs from Poland in the Baltic Sea and the retention of Swedish-occupied towns in Baltic Prussia [1]. This extended source of revenue would provide the monarchy more funding for the Swedish South Company, which had been founded in 1626 with a mandate to establish settlements between English Newfoundland and Spanish Florida. Up until now, the company had seen little activity due to difficulties in its establishment. Peace and revenue, however, would enable it to send its first expedition to the mouth of the Vasa River in early 1638 [2]. There, expeditionary leader Peter Minuit, the ex-governor of New Netherlands, would lead the establishment of Fort Maria Eleonora [3] and ultimately New Sweden. During its construction, the new colonial governor would gather the local sachems of the Lenape and Susquehannock tribes and use the same skills that had brokered the Dutch purchase of Manhattan Island back in 1626 to formally purchase lands around the Vasa River for the Swedish. These negotiations with the local tribes also served to override historical Dutch claims over the region.​

Peter-Minuit.jpg


Dramatized depiction of Peter Minuit’s meeting with the Lenape and Susquehannock sachems​

Although on the voyage back Peter Minuit would perish at sea while making a detour to the Caribbean, his accomplishments at Fort Maria Eleonora would secure the region for Sweden. Over the next few years, Finns and Swedes would come to settle in the new colony in small numbers and the Swedish South Company would rename itself the Company of New Sweden. To compensate for the small Swedish and Finnish populations at home, the new governor Peter Hollander Ridder would open the doors for prospective Livonian and German settlers and advertised the colony as the Lutheran star of the eastern seaboard in contrast to the Calvinists in New England and New Netherlands, the Catholics in Maryland, and the Anglicans in Virginia. This helped with population growth and by 1650, the colony boasted a total of 1,500 settlers [4] and was slowly expanding around the mouth of the Vasa River with the founding of outposts like Swedesboro. One notable aspect of the colony was the proliferation of log cabins from home as the primary architectural feature of New Sweden.

Further south, another nation had recently established a new foothold in the New World albeit through more forceful means. In its fight for independence and growing interest in the sugar plantations of Portuguese Brazil, the Dutch successfully invaded and captured Pernambunco, the richest sugar-producing region in the world, and other parts of northeastern Brazil. The Dutch West India Company, the counterpart of the VOC in the Americas, would further capitalize on their success and conquer the captaincies of Maranham, Rio Grande, Ceara, and Sergipi by 1637 [5]. Dutch Brazil, later to become New Holland, would subsequently conclude a truce that year with the Portuguese after the latter declared independence from Spain in 1635 and Cardinal Richelieu of France urged the Dutch to make peace with Lisbon. The peace would allow New Holland to consolidate its conquests and integrate the population into its institutions. The latter was particularly important as the Dutch represented only a small ruling minority in the colony and Dutch emigration to New Holland was matched by the emigration of many Portuguese settlers from Portuguese Brazil. Under the governance of John Maurice of Nassau-Siegen, a member of the House of Orange-Nassau, religious tolerance was granted to the Catholic-majority population and previously ostracized Portuguese Jews were given protection. Municipal and rural councils were also established to facilitate local government and it was through them that infrastructural improvements were conducted in the colony. It was through these measures and John Maurice’s personal dedication and love for Brazil that the colony thrived.​

Hollanders in brazilie.jpg


Harbor of Recife in 1640​

However, John Maurice was recalled to the Netherlands in 1642 when peace negotiations with the Spanish began and the Dutch felt the need to reduce military expenditures. Seeing an opportunity, disgruntled Portuguese planters rebelled the following year after years of resentment over the high interest rates they were charged to rebuild their plantations. They won at the Battle of Tabocas and within a year had retaken most of New Holland. In response, the Dutch sent an expeditionary force of 6,000 men and 41 ships to stamp out the rebellion and ensure the retention of key toeholds like Recife on the Brazilian coast. Despite some reversals, they were defeated at the 1st Battle of Guararapes in 1646. The Dutch would win the second clash in 1647, however, thanks to the timely arrival of a few thousand reinforcements including many Catholic Brabantines eager for new opportunities in a religiously tolerant, Catholic-majority Dutch colony [6]. The victors were able to regain most of their lost lands but at a very high cost: the constant infighting had significantly decreased the profitability of New Holland’s sugar plantations. Even as the process of redistributing plantations into the hands of Dutch-Flemish owners, the colony was dealt an ultimately fatal blow when the Portuguese retook Angola in 1648. As a result, New Holland now lacked their main slave market and in Amsterdam, New Holland came to be referred to as the “South American tumor”. In 1654, in the Treaty of the Hague, the Netherlands gave back their Brazilian possessions to Lisbon in return for an indemnity of 2 million guelders.

The treaty, however, proved to be a pyrrhic victory for Portugal for the Brazilian conflict permanently depressed the sugar industry in Pernambuco and Brazil's share in the sugar trade would precipitously decline for the rest of the century due to the rise of various plantations in the Caribbean. The biggest legacy of Dutch Brazil, however, would be the small number of Catholic Brabantine settlers who had come just after the Dutch Republic gained Flemish and Brabantine lands. They would stay for religious reasons and eventually would turn Recife into a Brabantine enclave within Portuguese Brazil.

[1]: TTL’s treaty is more favorable for Sweden compared to OTL because of the Protestant victory in the Imperial Liberties’ War putting Sweden in the superior position over the Commonwealth.

[2]: TTL’s name for the Delaware River

[3]: TTL’s name for Fort Christina

[4]: New Sweden’s population is much larger than OTL due to TTL’s changes.

[5]: The outright Dutch victory at Abrolhos paved the way for greater Dutch conquests ITTL.

[6]: Portuguese victory IOTL​
 
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