Nobunaga’s Ambition Realized: Dawn of a New Rising Sun

I’m actually hoping China stays powerful as a counterbalance to Japan in Asia. For me it’s more interesting to have a rivalry to balance things out, then Japan becoming the sole dominant power in this timeline. Makes TTL geopolitics (Especially in the 18th century conflicts) more interesting then having just Wank Japan for awhile
Personally, I would rather see China weaken a bit and be conquered by one of the smaller neighboring countries. Preferably Korea, as at the moment it is probably the only one on the continent that can do such a thing (i.e. it has a fairly stable internal situation and its armed forces have been modernized after the last war with the Japanese).
 
Personally, I would rather see China weaken a bit and be conquered by one of the smaller neighboring countries. Preferably Korea, as at the moment it is probably the only one on the continent that can do such a thing (i.e. it has a fairly stable internal situation and its armed forces have been modernized after the last war with the Japanese).
Korean China when?
 
Korean China when?

If Korea has any kind of major success against China....I can see someone saying that the ruling dynasty of China has lost The Mandate of Heaven and that results in a Dynastic War in China.....for reference, those are horrifyingly bloody....
 
I’m actually hoping China stays powerful as a counterbalance to Japan in Asia. For me it’s more interesting to have a rivalry to balance things out, then Japan becoming the sole dominant power in this timeline. Makes TTL geopolitics (Especially in the 18th century conflicts) more interesting then having just Wank Japan for awhile
Personally, I would rather see China weaken a bit and be conquered by one of the smaller neighboring countries. Preferably Korea, as at the moment it is probably the only one on the continent that can do such a thing (i.e. it has a fairly stable internal situation and its armed forces have been modernized after the last war with the Japanese).
I think that a stronger Joseon would be fascinating. The effects of a stronger Korea colonising Manchuria and then coming for China in the 19th century would be a very interesting scenario. Especially when nationalist ideas could spread from Japan into southern China a lot earlier than in otl, which may cause some Southern Chinese speakers to attempt to form their nations.
If Korea has any kind of major success against China....I can see someone saying that the ruling dynasty of China has lost The Mandate of Heaven and that results in a Dynastic War in China.....for reference, those are horrifyingly bloody....
China will always have bloody wars bc it's bloody huge lmao. Ming China in 1550 was like 26% of the population.
 
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Makes sense. I would worry for Japan's capability to man all these theatres, and as shown here Japanese capabilities are being stretched a bit too much.

Would we see a slowing down of the subjugation of Karafuto for a bit? Or would they use their main fleet? Creating a potential ally come out of Dai Viet would be good for the Japanese at the very least.
The subjugation of Karafuto is more of a multiyear process manned by men from Oshu with support ships and transports so it’s kinda separated from everything and wouldn’t really be affected. It’s more of an argument war-weary daimyo could use to pressure Azuchi to end involvement in the East Indies War more quickly and focus on “priorities”.
 
I predict years after the end of the Bourbon War Japan will have one of the largest navies in the Asia-Pacific region.

I also support the idea of a weakened China with an expansionist Joseon.
 
The subjugation of Karafuto is more of a multiyear process manned by men from Oshu with support ships and transports so it’s kinda separated from everything and wouldn’t really be affected. It’s more of an argument war-weary daimyo could use to pressure Azuchi to end involvement in the East Indies War more quickly and focus on “priorities”.
Makes sense considering that karafuto is a lot more easy to subjugate but it'd need time for it to be fully colonised.
 
I think that a stronger Joseon would be fascinating. The effects of a stronger Korea colonising Manchuria and then coming for China in the 19th century would be a very interesting scenario. Especially when nationalist ideas could spread from Japan into southern China a lot earlier than in otl, which may cause some Southern Chinese speakers to attempt to form their nations.

China will always have bloody wars bc it's bloody huge lmao. Ming China in 1550 was like 26% of the population.
Joseon would have to end up taking the role of the Manchus if they wanted a realistic shot for Dynastic rule in China, namely deciding to become culturally Chinese and subjugate their own culture, otherwise they're trapped in a quagmire like Japan was in Joseon OTL in the Imjin War, or the Sino Japanese War.

One could also argue that the Chinese Civil War of the 30s and 40s was the last OTL example of a Dyanstic change War, as the CCP has the Mandate of Heaven.
 
It would be cool if the Ainu were more accepted into the wider Japanese nation rather than suppressed and mostly assimilated into mainline Japanese.
 
I can see an endpoint for this timeline. Japan is considered the first Non-European Great Power....its very interesting.

When will Japan and Korea go head-to-head because that's probably going to happen at some point
 
I can see an endpoint for this timeline. Japan is considered the first Non-European Great Power....its very interesting.

When will Japan and Korea go head-to-head because that's probably going to happen at some point
This could potentially evolve into an East Asian version of the Great Game between Russia and Britain during the 19th century.
 
Joseon would have to end up taking the role of the Manchus if they wanted a realistic shot for Dynastic rule in China, namely deciding to become culturally Chinese and subjugate their own culture, otherwise they're trapped in a quagmire like Japan was in Joseon OTL in the Imjin War, or the Sino Japanese War.
Tbf I'd like any joseon-chinese war to be closer to the sino-japanese war, but I also think Joseon causing a collapse of china into squabbling states for the next few centuries would be fun too. After all, china did go through periods where the central han lands were disunited. With the concept of the concert of powers coming from Japan from their experiences in dealing with the Europeans they may be able to keep disunity in china for longer too.
 
Chapter 144: East Indies War Part VI - Ternate’s Last Stand and Bone’s Intervention

Chapter 144: East Indies War Part VI - Ternate’s Last Stand and Bone’s Intervention


After the successful campaign in the Moluccas in 1705, the Japanese and Tidorese were ready to follow up on their victories and continue their offensives. Dutch presence and strength in the region had been seriously weakened and even a direct naval advance upon Batavia itself was on the tables for 1706. Bad news, however, arrived when Tsuda Nobushige returned from Manila with the knowledge of the unsuccessful invasion and assault of the Trinh-controlled north of Dai Viet. Because of the losses from that disastrous campaign, Maeda Tomoyori was hesitant in providing more reinforcements for the much more successful Yamamoto Rintatsu. For the moment, the allied Japanese and Tidorese would have to make do with increasingly constrained manpower and military resources.

The Sula Islands, one of the last holdout possessions of the Ternate sultan Said Fathullah along with the Banggai region of Sulawesi, would be the first target. Largely left alone throughout the previous year, the weakened sultanate nevertheless had built up their defenses, recruited mercenaries, and mobilized the islands’ populace as well as loyal refugees from the capital. Once again, Alam Iskandar led the Tidorese while Aguro Atsuakira led Japanese land forces with Rintatsu providing naval support. The latter easily broke through the Ternatan fleet and began an archipelago-wide blockade as they facilitated amphibious landings upon all the islands. These, however, would all fierce resistance with support coming from Sanana, the biggest settlement and main fortification of the archipelago and also where Said Fathullah maintained his exiled court. Intense guerrilla warfare defined the fight over the Sula Islands in the early part of 1706. Slowly but surely, however, the superior and more numerous Japanese and Tidorese soldiers began to overwhelm Ternatan forces. By May only Sanana remained and it had already begun to be besieged by the armies of Alam Iskandar and Atsuakira, fated to fall into enemy hands.

Before that happened, however, the Japanese and Tidorese would be forced to face the pro-VOC Sultanate of Bone, ruled then by sultan Idris Azimuddin. His father, Saaduddin, had re-established his homeland as an independent polity during the Makassar War of 1666-1669 against sultan Hasanuddin of the Gowa Sultanate, the dominant power in South Sulawesi at the time. With the backing of the VOC, Saaduddin had won, establishing Bone as the new hegemon in the region with Dutch backing. Under Idris Azimuddin, the sultanate had continued to be a loyal ally of the VOC and now were prepared to assist the Dutch in expelling Tidore and Japan from occupied portions of the Dutch Moluccas. This would come in the form of a sizable armada carrying several thousand native warriors and mercenaries. In response to this, Rintatsu worked with Alam Iskandar and other Tidorese military personnel in coalescing reinforcements from the sultanate into his fleet in order to stop the impending invasion by Bone.

The two sides clashed on May 1st, 1706 near Banggai Bay which was situated on the eastern side of Banggai Island. The allied fleet consisted of 20 Japanese vessels and 30 Tidorese ships while Idris Azimuddin’s fleet was larger, with 65 ships including a handful of Dutch ships of the line loaned by the VOC to Bone. The naval engagement began around noon. Despite Bone’s numerical advantage, they were no match for Rintatsu’s allied fleet whose ships were of greater technological prowess and higher quality with more experienced and better trained crews. This was especially the case with the Japanese ships, filled with samurai dedicated to their admiral who had largely won every single naval battle thus far. It was these Japanese warships that particularly proved effective against Bone’s fleet and by the evening, the enemy had retreated.​

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Depiction of the first part of the Battle of Banggai Bay​

The story of this battle, however, had not ended just yet. After what they thought was the final victory, Rintatsu had docked many of his ships in the bay. With his guard down, he was oblivious as Bone’s warriors prepared a night assault upon the fleet from the jungles of Banggai. On that night, these warriors boarded canoes and even the warships themselves and immediately threw themselves upon the surprise Japanese crew. Messy close quarters combat in the dark followed, the Japanese surprisingly putting up fierce resistance. This was all expected, however, as the enemy began to prepare to torch the ships completely. Just before this happened, however, Suzuki Kunimasu (鈴木国益) let out a emergency firework signal on the Shichijo-maru (七条丸) in an attempt to alert any allied vessels in the distance. Not used to such displays, Bone’s warriors were caught off guard. Some, especially those on land, were startled enough to flee. Others were stunned, exposing them to a Japanese counterattack. This single signal disrupted Bone’s night assault and eventually, the Japanese crews were able to oust them from their decks and force them to retreat back into the jungle. Although victorious, the Japanese had suffered heavy losses. Still shaken from the night assault, the fleet completely left the area 2 days later.

Although they experienced a close call, the Japanese had nevertheless repulsed the forces of Bone and neutralized the military threat they posed. This victory paved the way for Ternate’s inevitable surrender at Sanana. The final days of the siege of Sanana were bloody, with Said Fathullah’s loyal troops fighting to the death and the Tidorese and Japanese forced to shed blood over every bit of soil. Aguro Atsuakira, who was at the helm of the Japanese forces in this offensive, would be killed while attempting to capture one of the sultan’s concubines. By June, however, Sanana had fallen and the last sultan of Ternate would be executed by the Tidorese, many of his followers and relatives either taken hostage or sold into slavery. With this, all that remained of the once great Ternate sultanate was its Banggai holdings on Sulawesi, where Said Fathullah’s 23 year old Kaicili Kabruwana held nominal control.

At this stage, the Japanese were filled with confidence as their principal objectives as well as those of the Tidorese had been fulfilled and the VOC had been chased out of the region completely. Furthermore, Azuchi had authorized reinforcements to sail from Sakai the Moluccan theater under the command of Ikeda Masataka (池田政応) earlier in the year and they soon arrived, granting the Japanese much-needed manpower lost from the many battles fought. Despite this, however, numerous issues soon began to surface. Aguro Atsuakira’s death had been felt hard with the Japanese troops from Bireito in particular in deep mourning, weakening the morale and discipline of the collective forces. Additionally, back and forth conversations between the Tidorese and Japanese soon revealed sultan Abu Falalal Mansur’s reluctance to move forward with new plans as his sultanate stood little to gain from attacking either Portuguese Timor or Java. Finally, a series of revolts began to break out in the recently conquered islands, preoccupying Tidorese and Japanese attention and resources. Hawks like Yamamoto Rintatsu would be forced, therefore, to wait on future ambitions of taking either Portuguese Timor or Dutch Java.​

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Portrait of Yamamoto Rintatsu​

Meanwhile, Batavia and the other anti-Bourbon powers would not remain idle. The VOC was preparing a large fleet of its own warships as well as those of the Portuguese, English, and its own indigenous vassals to recapture all of its lost holdings in the Moluccas in order to once again profit from the spice trade, which the victorious Japanese and Tidorese had begun to take advantage of. The Portuguese themselves had sent reinforcements from Goa in the previous year to primarily fight the French and Siamese, although some of their ships and men would be sent to aid the VOC. Idris Azimuddin, meanwhile, had been licking his wounds from his fleet’s defeat at Banggai Bay and was eager to get revenge on the Japanese and Tidorese, especially Rintatsu. A direct challenge therefore awaited the pro-Bourbon side in the recently conquered collection of Spice Islands.​
 
it seems like the Indonesian front is prepared for a last great battle between Japan and Tidore and the Anti-bourbon coalition excited to see what would happen
 
@Ambassador Huntsman Amazing work as always! Hoping that the Japanese can stand firm in the face of such a force, their gains must be preserved!
Great chapter as always, @Ambassador Huntsman!
Thank you!!
One of the biggest naval battles of the East Indies is about to unfold. I for one am totally excited!!!
it seems like the Indonesian front is prepared for a last great battle between Japan and Tidore and the Anti-bourbon coalition excited to see what would happen
Just wait until you see everything else to come with the rest of the war...
 
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