Nobunaga’s Ambition Realized: Dawn of a New Rising Sun

Cheers for the Japanese taking the Dutch Malaccas! Even with the French doing roughly the same as otl, having a very different Asian theatre due to Japanese intervention is good for France as it would distract the Dutch navy and make the Dutch focus on the Japanese.

I think the main thing is that mainland SEA probably won't end in a way that benefits Japan and Siam. Vietnam's rise would affect Siam and there's not much Siam could do.
 
Off topic but a few questions I wanted to ask that I wished I had asked a long while ago during the cultural development in Japan.

First, what are sports and games like in Japan? Oda Nobunaga was a huge fan of Sumo Wrestling, but there were other sports such as Kemari, since that regained popularity in OTL Edo Period. But I'm also wondering if western sports like 'Real tennis' from France could've catch on in Japan.

For games, how would Shogi develop, as many variants were created during OTL Edo Period. And also, the development of Karuta, since again a lot of developments happened during the Edo Period, especially with Sakoku, since that forced Japanese cards to develop separately from the world. Without the isolation policies and also the two major civil wars and overseas interventions, how would that effect the designs of these games?

Second question and most minor, we've discussed how food was altered, with sugar, spices, sweet potatoes, and European dishes such as crepes becoming popular. But what about Cheese? Has cheese caught on with some of the populace, or does the 'Lactose intolerance' make it less likely?

Also, what things we consider 'dessert flavors' about Chocolate, Cinnamon and Vanilla? Are those more exotic luxurious delicacies for the samurai class? (Wondering if Mochi treats started getting these types of flavors)

For the third question, we've mentioned marriages a few times, and besides the Imperial Family and important noble families such as the Konoe (Before they were abolished), which Daimyo clans do Oda "Princes" tend to marry or take concubines the most from, whether out of marriage alliances or even love? If at all that is.

And vice versa as well. Which clans does the Oda Clan tend to send Oda "Princesses" marry to for marriage alliances? Again, if at all that is. (Clans such as the Tokugawa, Date, Hashiba, Akechi, Mogami, Sakuma, Ikeda, Shimazu, Mori, the other Mori, Shibata, Takigawa, Maeda, etc.)
 
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cheers to the Japanese for having defeated one of the biggest European naval powers of the time, although that last line was ominous I don't think the result of the warn in europe would change a lot from OTL but the results in Asia are going to be interesting without a doubt
 
First, what are sports and games like in Japan? Oda Nobunaga was a huge fan of Sumo Wrestling, but there were other sports such as Kemari, since that regained popularity in OTL Edo Period. But I'm also wondering if western sports like 'Real tennis' from France could've catch on in Japan.
It would be interesting to see a version of competitive kemari be developed with a net and the such by pulling influence from the cuju and real tennis. It'd basically be kick volleyball.
For games, how would Shogi develop, as many variants were created during OTL Edo Period. And also, the development of Karuta, since again a lot of developments happened during the Edo Period, especially with Sakoku, since that forced Japanese cards to develop separately from the world. Without the isolation policies and also the two major civil wars and overseas interventions, how would that effect the designs of these games?
One thing about karuta is that I could see the Japanese develop a shedding card game with karuta cards. Khanhoo should be developing into a shedding card game, and a Japanese version that either keeps the older version or developing something else from it.
Second question and most minor, we've discussed how food was altered, with sugar, spices, sweet potatoes, and European dishes such as crepes becoming popular. But what about Cheese? Has cheese caught on with some of the populace, or does the 'Lactose intolerance' make it less likely?
Cheese prob would develop as we see European cattle be transported from Europe or we see milk cows be developed as the Japanese become more acquainted with milking practices.

Such things prob would start in Japanese Monasteries too, as they would be the first to attempt to emulate the Europeans.

I also think hard cheeses would be the things that the Japanese would make first, as it would be a good way to deal with lactose. I don't think the Europeans used milk much in their diet before this though.
 
Off topic but a few questions I wanted to ask that I wished I had asked a long while ago during the cultural development in Japan.

First, what are sports and games like in Japan? Oda Nobunaga was a huge fan of Sumo Wrestling, but there were other sports such as Kemari, since that regained popularity in OTL Edo Period. But I'm also wondering if western sports like 'Real tennis' from France could've catch on in Japan.

For games, how would Shogi develop, as many variants were created during OTL Edo Period. And also, the development of Karuta, since again a lot of developments happened during the Edo Period, especially with Sakoku, since that forced Japanese cards to develop separately from the world. Without the isolation policies and also the two major civil wars and overseas interventions, how would that effect the designs of these games?

Second question and most minor, we've discussed how food was altered, with sugar, spices, sweet potatoes, and European dishes such as crepes becoming popular. But what about Cheese? Has cheese caught on with some of the populace, or does the 'Lactose intolerance' make it less likely?

Also, what things we consider 'dessert flavors' about Chocolate, Cinnamon and Vanilla? Are those more exotic luxurious delicacies for the samurai class? (Wondering if Mochi treats started getting these types of flavors)

For the third question, we've mentioned marriages a few times, and besides the Imperial Family and important noble families such as the Konoe (Before they were abolished), which Daimyo clans do Oda "Princes" tend to marry or take concubines the most from, whether out of marriage alliances or even love? If at all that is.

And vice versa as well. Which clans does the Oda Clan tend to send Oda "Princesses" marry to for marriage alliances? Again, if at all that is. (Clans such as the Tokugawa, Date, Hashiba, Akechi, Mogami, Sakuma, Ikeda, Shimazu, Mori, the other Mori, Shibata, Takigawa, Maeda, etc.)
Many questions to answer. So sports are largely the same, though Kemari is more popular ITTL as court nobility have greater influence in the government through the daijo-fu. Imma have to look more into games but karuta cards would definitely sport more Western and non-Japanese patterns and logos. Cheese and other foreign foods/flavors, if eaten, are limited to urban areas and are definitely restricted in access.

In terms of marriages, members of the Oda clan marry princesses from lower nobility as well as the biggest tozama daimyo clans like the Tokugawa and Nanbu as well as cadet branches of the Oda clan but mostly to the high nobility and imperial family. And vice versa. Fudai daimyo don't really get involved in the marriage interactions.
I also think hard cheeses would be the things that the Japanese would make first, as it would be a good way to deal with lactose. I don't think the Europeans used milk much in their diet before this though.
This.
 
Chapter 143: East Indies War Part V - Assault Upon the Trinh North

Chapter 143: East Indies War Part V - Assault Upon the Trinh North

When Nguyen lord Nguyen Phuc Chu initially laid out his plan to invade the Trinh-controlled north of Dai Viet to the Japanese, Spanish, and French, there was little appetite at the time due to all three being preoccupied and overextended. However, the Vietnamese lord remained persistent in his demands, using every argument he could to persuade at least Manila and Awari to give him aid. Eventually, a combination of Phuc Chu’s patience and promising news on other fronts, including the successful repulsion of the Anglo-Dutch from key French and Siamese ports and rumors of Yamomoto Rintatsu’s success in the Moluccas, persuaded Kanbe Yoshihiro, Maeda Tomoyori, and Philippine governor-general de Echevarri to give the Nguyen clan a chance. The three sides came together and drew up a plan to invade the Trinh-controlled north and force it out of the war, potentially even toppling the Trinh lords entirely in favor of the Nguyen. Tomoyori would lead the main Japanese navy along with several Spanish warships to blockade Dai Viet and defeat the Dutch-Vietnamese naval presence. Meanwhile, the Tokugawa navy would transport several thousand Spanish and Japanese soldiers towards the main Nguyen army, from where they would serve under the command of Phuc Chu and assist in the Nguyen invasion of the Trinh domain from the south.

In May 1705, Mukai Masamori and the Tokugawa navy transported 6,000 Spanish and Japanese reinforcements to the Nguyen capital of Binh Dinh. These troops to assist the Nguyen army directly were led by Yoshida Sukezane (吉田資実), a samurai lord with landholdings in the Cagayan Valley and who also was conveniently fluent in Spanish and Ilocano. As a result, he had the confidence of the Filipino levies and Spanish soldiers despite historical animosity and conflict between Azuchi and Madrid. Sukezane would quickly integrate into the main Nguyen army of 20,000 men, directly commanded by Phuc Chu himself. This combined force, totaling 26,000, quickly set off north. As Trinh Can was focused on securing victory in Lan Xang over the Siamese, Phuc Chu found little resistance and quickly began retaking territory lost during the Trinh-Nguyen war from the previous century. Eventually, the Nguyen lord reached the old capital of Hue and began besieging it.

By this time, however, Trinh Can had managed to rally the reserves and bring together an army in response to Phuc Chu’s invasion. This army would be led by Trinh Cuong, the 19 year old heir and great-grandson of Trinh Can, along with a host of experienced military advisors and officers. Among these was the Dutchman and VOC official Lodewijck Calvart who brought along several hundred European mercenaries. Aside from these Dutch troops, 21,000 Trinh soldiers were now heading straight towards the Nguyen besiegers at Hue. Hearing of the Trinh approach, Nguyen Phuc Chu diverted most of his army into a defensive formation in preparation for an assault, reserving 4,000 men for the continuous siege of Hue. He set up camp on the southeastern banks of the Song Sia river where he saw Trinh Cuong’s army approach. The Trinh army would also make camp, right across from the Nguyen position. Between the two was the river and a bridge.​

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Yellow = Trinh, Brown = Nguyen, Salmon = Japanese​

Around 10am on July 15th, the Battle of Song Sia commenced with infantry on both sides rushing upon the bridge and engaging in messy melee combat. The Dutch mercenaries led the Trinh offensive and nearly succeeded in taking the bridge for the Trinh heir but were stopped by samurai musketeers and swordsmen from Luson and Bireito. Both sides also utilized artillery and archers against one anothers, arrows and cannonballs being launched over the water and pounding their targets. By the late afternoon, both sides were exhausted and had suffered heavy losses. Although this meant that the siege of Hue continued uninterrupted, the Nguyen lord knew that Trinh reinforcements would shortly arrive in a matter of days and that he needed to win the battle now before he became outnumbered. This is when Sukezane approached Phuc Chu with the idea to launch a surprise attack upon the Trinh army’s flank, one led by his samurai cavalry. Phuc Chu greenlit the Japanese commander’s proposal, attaching Nguyen cavalry to Sukezane’s samurai and Filipino troops. This contingent of 3,000 swiftly crossed the river at a point further downstream that night.

The next morning, Trinh Cuong was awakened to what he thought was a mere disturbance, only to quickly realize that Sukezane’s contingent had beset upon his camp. Catching the enemy by surprise, Sukezane’s samurai cavalry, Vietnamese cavalry, and Lusonese skirmishers were quickly overrunning the Trinh camp and scattering its men. Only the Dutch mercenaries retained their discipline, loyally guarding the Trinh heir. Meanwhile, Phuc Chu had caught sight of the successful surprise attack from across the river and ordered his men forward across the bridge. As Nguyen and Spanish soldiers began to stream across the bridge and join the attack, Trinh Cuong saw that the battle had been lost and ordered his army to retreat. The nature of the Nguyen attack, however, had broken down any semblance of organization among Cuong’s men, resulting in thousands of men being cut down or captured in their unsuccessful flight. The battle had ended in a disastrous defeat for the Trinh clan, with this victory for the Nguyen clan followed up 2 days later by the surrender of Hue. Hearing of the defeat, Trinh reinforcements en route to Trinh Cuong also retreated back north.

Success on land, however, would not be replicated at sea. Maeda Tomoyori had mobilized the main fleet at Manila and departed around the same time Sukezane landed on the mainland, dispersing scattered Trinh junks and entering the Gulf of Tonkin in order to initiate a blockade in conjunction with the land invasion. In response to the rapid advance of the 30+ ship fleet, Trinh Can directed the emergency mobilization of available junks and asked the VOC for naval assistance. A sizable fleet led jointly by Trinh noble Tieu Dang Minh and VOC official Hugo Martens thus came together under the purview of the Trinh lord. While this was happening, the Japanese fleet was bombarding and raiding Trinh ports ahead of Nguyen Phuc Chu’s land advance and was thus partially scattered. This was the situation it was in when the main contingent, numerically deprived and disadvantaged but still formidable, was found and hunted down by the Dutch-Trinh fleet on July 22nd. In what would be known as the 1st Battle of the Tonkin Gulf, Dutch warships and Trinh junks alike pounded the surprised Japanese while smaller but nimbler Vietnamese ships maneuvered around Tomoyori’s warships, boarding many and causing further mayhem upon an already confused enemy. Nevertheless, Japanese warships and the well-trained samurai sailors provided fierce resistance, successfully repulsing all of their boardings and sinking several Vietnamese vessels. It wasn’t enough to prevent heavy losses, however, and with many crews still in a state of partial shock and confusion Tomoyori was forced to retreat out of the Gulf.​

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Vietnamese junk from the Battle of the Tonkin Gulf​

This naval defeat forced the Japanese to relieve the blockade, with Tomoyori subsequently retreating all the way back to Manila. Those scattered ships that hadn’t caught word and successfully retreated out of hostile waters would be captured or sunk in the coming weeks. The attempted naval blockade by the Japanese in support of Nguyen Phuc Chu’s northerly invasion was a complete failure. Ultimately, this would also cut short Phuc Chu’s own plans. Although he made it as far as Quang Binh, the Nguyen lord subsequently retreated back to Hue after hearing of the outcome in the Gulf of Tonkin. From there, he consolidated his gains, continuing to be supported by Yoshida Sukezane’s men as well as Mukai Masamori, who had remained along with the majority of the Tokugawa navy in case another opportunity backed by the full might of the Japanese. However, the loss at Tonkin Gulf had spooked Tomoyori out of using Japanese military might to directly knock the Trinh-controlled Vietnamese north out of the war. The outcome of that battle would also be a factor in his dismissal from the position of naval shogun after the East Indies War. In any case, the war would continue.​
 
Very good chapter. I'm wondering if further gains from the Japanese in Mainland SEA will force a Chinese intervention, even in the current state they're in, since it further disrupts the Chinese Hegemonic Tributary system
 
It's sad that at the end that the battle is won but the war is lost in terms of the sea, but there isn't much that the armies can do. I do think that Japan can manage against the Dutch when the Japanese get their navies in line though.
Very good chapter. I'm wondering if further gains from the Japanese in Mainland SEA will force a Chinese intervention, even in the current state they're in, since it further disrupts the Chinese Hegemonic Tributary system
Depends. China is very much dictated by palace infighting, and it seems Ming China was going through one of them. Depending on how it pans out it can go from 'doing absolutely nothing' to 'invading vietnam'. Not that anyone in Vietnam would like being invaded by the Chinese.
 
It's sad that at the end that the battle is won but the war is lost in terms of the sea, but there isn't much that the armies can do. I do think that Japan can manage against the Dutch when the Japanese get their navies in line though.
A lot of it is that already Japan is starting to get overextended in terms of its navy: Rintatsu in the Moluccas, the Tokugawa helping out the Nguyen lords, the main navy at Manila, and naval support for the ongoing integration and subjugation of northern Karafuto. And they decided to go after Dai Viet, a well-populated and prosperous regional power.
Depends. China is very much dictated by palace infighting, and it seems Ming China was going through one of them. Depending on how it pans out it can go from 'doing absolutely nothing' to 'invading vietnam'. Not that anyone in Vietnam would like being invaded by the Chinese.
Chapter 145 (after another chapter of the war) will focus on the aftermath of Yongwu’s death in China and the mainland in general so more on that.
Great chapter! I love this timeline.
@Ambassador Huntsman ! Amazing chapter as always! Love this TL!
Thank you!!
 
A lot of it is that already Japan is starting to get overextended in terms of its navy: Rintatsu in the Moluccas, the Tokugawa helping out the Nguyen lords, the main navy at Manila, and naval support for the ongoing integration and subjugation of northern Karafuto. And they decided to go after Dai Viet, a well-populated and prosperous regional power.
Makes sense. I would worry for Japan's capability to man all these theatres, and as shown here Japanese capabilities are being stretched a bit too much.

Would we see a slowing down of the subjugation of Karafuto for a bit? Or would they use their main fleet? Creating a potential ally come out of Dai Viet would be good for the Japanese at the very least.
Chapter 145 (after another chapter of the war) will focus on the aftermath of Yongwu’s death in China and the mainland in general so more on that.
I am very hyped for that. China will always be important in how things go (whether by not acting due to Chinese focus on themselves or by acting decisively) and the future of Japan will very much depend on how China's trajectory is. Ofc I hope China slips into isolationism again so that Japan has more of a free hand but I'll be happy either way as Japan does need a rival in Asia.
 
I am very hyped for that. China will always be important in how things go (whether by not acting due to Chinese focus on themselves or by acting decisively) and the future of Japan will very much depend on how China's trajectory is. Ofc I hope China slips into isolationism again so that Japan has more of a free hand but I'll be happy either way as Japan does need a rival in Asia.
I’m actually hoping China stays powerful as a counterbalance to Japan in Asia. For me it’s more interesting to have a rivalry to balance things out, then Japan becoming the sole dominant power in this timeline. Makes TTL geopolitics (Especially in the 18th century conflicts) more interesting then having just Wank Japan for awhile
 
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