Nobunaga’s Ambition Realized: Dawn of a New Rising Sun

Great chapter it seems like the early XVIII century is going to be a very bloody one for the european powers that may be beneficial for the asian ones
 
Alternatively, I think it’s possible that Japanese power and influence on asia could make European powers pivot to Africa earlier as the Japanese are taking up a much more dynamic role than the Chinese have or will.
 
Alternatively, I think it’s possible that Japanese power and influence on asia could make European powers pivot to Africa earlier as the Japanese are taking up a much more dynamic role than the Chinese have or will.
Yes, but Europeans would still suffer heavily from diseases which would take a long time to get cured. That in turn would make outright imperialism very difficult in Africa.
 
Yes, yes I can. Ethiopia’s unique situation could easily attract the attention of Japanese travelers, merchants, and traders.
Honestly I could see a sorta of weird positive relationship between the two: isolated nations in mountainous terrain with ancient revered bloodlines who are descendants of notables and blessed by the divine, both warding off European influence to trail their own path, independent and unconquered and standing tall against the world.
 
Honestly I could see a sorta of weird positive relationship between the two: isolated nations in mountainous terrain with ancient revered bloodlines who are descendants of notables and blessed by the divine, both warding off European influence to trail their own path, independent and unconquered and standing tall against the world.
This could lead to Japanese people being fascinated by Ethiopian culture, like how Japanese culture is viewed by white people in America today.
 
Yes, but Europeans would still suffer heavily from diseases which would take a long time to get cured. That in turn would make outright imperialism very difficult in Africa.
Maybe, but necessity is the mother of invention, and the path to success is perseverance. Given the "openness" of the Far Eastern countries, led by Japan, Europeans may feel greater/faster pressure to colonize Africa. After all, one of the reasons for this process in the OTL of the 19th century was the lack of other, more convenient areas to explore and occupy. Plus, note that the lack of isolationism in Asian countries may lead to faster development of several fields of science, including medicine.
 
Maybe, but necessity is the mother of invention, and the path to success is perseverance. Given the "openness" of the Far Eastern countries, led by Japan, Europeans may feel greater/faster pressure to colonize Africa. After all, one of the reasons for this process in the OTL of the 19th century was the lack of other, more convenient areas to explore and occupy. Plus, note that the lack of isolationism in Asian countries may lead to faster development of several fields of science, including medicine.
I think that except Southern Africa (where tsetse fly populations are low) most of it would be colonised in the 19th century. Southern Africa going through a different colonisation process would be interesting at the very least, and I would love seeing more colonisation from the Dutch at least. Maybe we see an alternate group of Protestants get pissed at the dutch government and leave, which is possible considering how the Netherlands have to juggle between the Protestants and Catholics ittl. Maybe we see a very anti-catholic group leave for South Africa bc they hate their Catholic neighbours too much.
I mean it's a possibility and an intriguing concept, but as of now there aren't any Japan-controlled ports on the subcontinent so would be very difficult.
What about in Sri Lanka though?
 
I think that except Southern Africa (where tsetse fly populations are low) most of it would be colonised in the 19th century. Southern Africa going through a different colonisation process would be interesting at the very least, and I would love seeing more colonisation from the Dutch at least. Maybe we see an alternate group of Protestants get pissed at the dutch government and leave, which is possible considering how the Netherlands have to juggle between the Protestants and Catholics ittl. Maybe we see a very anti-catholic group leave for South Africa bc they hate their Catholic neighbours too much.

What about in Sri Lanka though?
Sri Lanka is Portuguese ITTL so no.
If there were to be a Japanese-controlled port or a couple which Indian port city/cities might it/they be?
I'll have a South Asian/Indian Ocean chapter in the future that'll address that.
 
What I’m curious about is if the mergence of the Japanese would alter or cause Europeans to reconsider their emerging white-supremacist ideology. Maybe not because it was necessitated by chattel slavery so that Europeans could justify its use.
 
What I’m curious about is if the mergence of the Japanese would alter or cause Europeans to reconsider their emerging white-supremacist ideology. Maybe not because it was necessitated by chattel slavery so that Europeans could justify its use.
There will be great changes in the next century. One great fact of the last millenium is that during the Age of Sail, Europeans had "the Seven Seas" pretty much to themselves. None of the other major civilizations ventured much outside their immediate neighborhoods, and some barely went to sea at all. Woody Allen once remarked "80% of life is showing up." OTL, Europeans showed up everywhere, and no one else did. ITTL, Japan is going to show up in a lot of places that never saw civilized non-whites OTL.
 
Chapter 142: East Indies War Part IV - The Moluccan Campaign of 1705

Chapter 142: East Indies War Part IV - The Moluccan Campaign of 1705


The Tidorese-Japanese joint campaign in the Moluccas against the Dutch and their client states began in earnest in early 1705, with Yamamoto Rintatsu’s navy to play a key role in furthering any allied efforts to take islands from the enemy. The main target would be VOC-controlled western Seram, Buru, and Obi Islands as well as the Sula archipelago, now the primary stronghold of the Ternate sultanate with Tidore already having seized their capital of Ternate, the island of Morotai, and territories on Halmahera. Tidore, already controlling eastern Seram, had made attempts to take the western half but had failed mostly due to insufficient naval support. Sultan Faharuddin was confident that his army and Japan’s forces would succeed in this upcoming campaign. His hopes, as well as those of Japanese leaders like Rintatsu and Tsuda Nobushige, were boosted early with the capture of the Obi Islands in March 1705, the Tobelo chiefs there submitting to Tidore-Japanese forces relatively quickly.

Quickly becoming aware of the arrival of Rintatsu’s navy in the Moluccas, Batavia worked to bring together a sizable fleet to confront and defeat the Japanese. Commanded by Koen van Beest, the VOC’s navy would depart Batavia in early spring 1705 and would be joined by a handful of Portuguese warships and vessels from Dutch vassal states. Although various Dutch warships had already been sailing the seas of the Moluccas and had helped limit previous Tidorese campaigns in the previous year, this larger navy would be fully capable of preventing upcoming amphibious transports and defeating the growing anti-VOC naval presence. With this intent in mind, van Beest would focus on tracking down and smashing Rintatsu’s main fleet as soon as he could. Before van Beest’s ships were able to arrive onto the scene, however, Rintatsu’s Tidorese allies would inform the Japanese naval commander of the Dutch fleet’s impending approach and perceived goal. Rintatsu would prepare accordingly and positioned his fleet just south of Seram and Buru near the isle of Ambelau. He placed a group of fast-moving Tidorese vessels on his left wing, ordering several hundred men to land on the island and set up a series of cannons and placing his main fleet in between. Both fleets were composed of around 25 ships.​

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Green = VOC, Salmon = Japanese, Yellow = Tidorese​

The Battle of Ambelau would take place on May 16th. Although van Beest had learned of Rintatsu’s presence near the isle, he would be taken by surprise by the wily Japanese commander. Rintatsu and the main fleet would sail ahead first in order to lure the Dutch fleet out, warships beginning to exchange barrages of cannonfire. Although the impact of the exchanges was initially even and balanced, this began to change when Japanese cannons began firing from land, sinking a Portuguese warship and catching the van Beest by surprise. The Dutch naval captain then ordered ships further in the back to advance forwards and from the Dutch fleet’s right flank. This is when the Tidorese vessels sailed forwards as well, returning fire and forcing the enemy to halt. Despite coming under heavy fire, Rintatsu and his men remained steady and unfazed, getting close enough to board several ships. Once this happened, van Beest’s fleet began falling apart. Unable to maneuver Rintatsu or counter Tidorese-Japanese momentum, the VOC coalition fleet began to fall back though this only incurred even more losses. By the end of the naval engagement, most of the Dutch-Portuguese fleet had been destroyed with the opposing Japanese and Tidorese sailors suffering light casualties in comparison, with very few ships having been sunk amidst the battle.

Around the same time Rintatsu was contending with the Dutch, the Japanese and Tidorese were jointly advancing upon Seram. The Japanese were led by Tsuda Nobushige and Aguro Atsuakira while the Tidorese were led by Alam Iskandar, a veteran general of the sultanate who had commanded land forces in Tidore’s previous attempt in taking the whole of Seram. Like before, Alam Iskandar’s men were able to quickly take over the interior of Dutch Seram. The main obstacle toward victory lay in the VOC’s numerous forts which had resisted the Tidorese time and time again, notably Laala, Loehoe, and Saway on the Hoamoal Peninsula, due to Dutch naval strength. This time, however, the Japanese were able to sweep away the VOC’s ships aside, blockading all three forts and finally giving Tidorese and Japanese land forces the advantage. Aguro Atsuakira led Japanese amphibious landings on the peninsula while Tsuda Nobushige oversaw the blockading and bombarding of the Dutch fortifications.

Under intense fire and pressure, Laala and Saway quickly fell, leaving Loehoe as the remaining Dutch holdout on Seram. Loehoe, home to Fort Overburg, had a high number of skilled mercenaries alongside indigenous levies and Dutch officers which allowed it to hold out while awaiting relief from Batavia. One of these mercenaries, Hara Willem-Shinsuke (原ウィレム信介), would notably stand out in the Japanese imagination for being a descendant of samurai mercenaries hired by the VOC 90 years earlier. Although he was of mixed Japanese-Javanese heritage and an adherent of the Dutch Calvinist faith, Willem-Shinsuke proudly adorned his ancestor’s samurai armor and wielded a katana passed down to him. In what would prove to be a legendary moment in the Siege of Loehoe-Overburg, Willem-Shinsuke rode his horse and led a sortie out of the fort, catching the Japanese by surprise and nearly making it to Atsuakira’s main camp before being gunned down and subsequently beheaded. Acts of feat from the other side aside, the Japanese and Tidorese would wear down the fort’s garrison with largely minimal losses and the VOC would give up by June when they realized no relief would come to prevent defeat by attrition and starvation.​

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Depiction of VOC settlements of Laala, Overburg, and Saway​

After the capture of western Seram, there would be a brief pause in the fighting amongst the Tidorese as sultan Hamza Faharuddin passed away, his death preoccupying Tidore as his son Abu Falalal Mansur became the next sultan. In the meantime, the Japanese turned to the island of Ambon, a smaller isle just south of Seram. After his victory at Ambelau, Rintatsu had already begun a blockade of the island and its main fortress (also called Ambon), ordering several hundred of his men to construct a makeshift fort in the vicinity of the VOC fortifications. As soon as Loehoe surrendered to the Japanese and Tidorese, Nobushige began shifting his focus to Ambon. With Japanese reinforcements beginning to arrive and the news of the complete defeat of the VOC in Seram spilling into Ambon, the Dutch garrison there saw the writing on the wall and surrendered in August.

The Japanese now turned their attention to Buru and the main port of Kayeli. Although having been cut off from Batavia for months, the VOC garrison there had had much more time to prepare for an attack upon the fortifications. As a result, they would prove to be a tough nut to crack. Once again, Rintatsu’s fleet easily pinned any Dutch warships to its harbor before firing upon them, sinking every vessel and rendering the docks of Kayeli unusable. The Japanese naval commander, however, would have a much more difficult time landing troops like he had done before. The Dutch were well-prepared, scattering groups of 5-10 mercenaries and natives around the bay that would ambush any unsuspecting enemy soldier. Additionally, their artillery prevented Rintatsu from conducting an amphibious landing upon the bombarded docks of Kayeli. The garrison’s hopes lay in the hope of yet another fleet to come to the rescue.

Indeed, one would come though not from where they expected. This time, a fleet from East Timor, solely under Portuguese command, had sailed into Moluccan waters. Rintatsu would take half of the ships under his command and sail towards the enemy fleet led by captain Xavier Rocha. Coincidentally, they would clash near Ambelau in what would be known as the 2nd Battle of Ambelau, albeit taking place on the opposite side of the isle. This naval engagement would be smaller in scale and tactically more simple, being much more of a confrontation between two groups of Western-style warships. In the end, though, the outcome would be the same as the 1st Battle of Ambelau and Yamamoto Rintatsu added yet another victory under his belt. Back at Kayeli, Aguro Atsuakira had taken over command of the naval blockade and assault upon the port, taking over for Tsuda Nobushige who was sailing back to Manila to present a report on the ongoing campaign to Kanbe Yoshihiro and Maeda Tomoyori. Tidorese reinforcements more suited for jungle warfare began to arrive with the new sultan now finished with his enthronement ceremonies and refocused on the war once again. Kayeli would fall in late October and by the end of the year the entire island of Buru had fallen under Japanese control.​

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1705 campaign in the Moluccas (black = Japanese and Tidorese, red = VOC coalition)​

By the end of the year, the Japanese and Tidorese had wrapped up a successful campaign of conquest in the Moluccas, capturing all islands directly controlled by the VOC and weakening Dutch-Portuguese naval power. Although Dutch overextension against the French, Siamese, and Japanese elsewhere played a part in Batavia’s losses in the region, the brilliant command of Yamamoto Rintatsu also ensured victory in a region far from Japan’s usual sphere of influence. As Tsuda Nobushige, who had returned to Manila to update his superiors on Japanese success in the Moluccas, would soon learn, however, Azuchi and its allies had experienced much less success in other theaters of the war in 1705.​
 
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