Nobody Expects: The Spanish Revolution

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Onerom, Aug 2, 2019.

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  1. Gallinatus Member

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    Jan 17, 2015
    Nice Work!,The "Empire of the Americas" sounds very interesting.
     
  2. ruth 高い城の女

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    I really like the subtle signs of the influence of Spanish-as-a-global-language in modern English, like the use of the term "líder" and the writing of centuries with Roman numerals.
     
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  3. Threadmarks: Charlotte I of Mexico Wikibox

    Onerom Orchard Lord

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    upload_2019-8-13_17-30-32.png

    I'm glad you like it, another person already comented about it, which is a pity because as you can infer from this wikiboxes it didn't last long and never really covered all the lands it claimed. The Empire of the Americas and the Indies (Imperio de las Américas y las Indias) was the far-fetched attempt of Ferdinand of Bourbon to reimpose the Spanish Empire, just from Mexico City instead of Madrid. It didn't succeed, and as you can see after his death his successors relinquished their claim to non-Novohispanic lands and intitled themselves "Emperors of Mexico", Emperadores de México (or Empresses, Emperatrices, as it seems...)

    I'm ashamed to admit that it was unitended, an interference from my native language: I'm used to writting centuries with Roman numerals, and in the previous updates I took care to follow Wikipedia structure using Arabics, but this time It seems I have forgotten. However, to avoid having to change it, we can assume that ITL the article would be written mainly by Spanish-speaking Texans, who would consider the Roman numerals the norm, so it's their fault and not mine XD

    The "liders" idem, when the words sound the same in English and Spanish I sometimes write the Spanish form unwillingly and it doesn't seem wrong when I read to check. Again, in an exercise of immersion we can consider that the Texan equivalent to the Founding Fathers are called Líderes de la Patria, and the world is used in English with the Spanish ortography to talk about Latin American non-authoritarian leaders in analogy to OTL Caudillos and Libertadores.

    A change it is intended and that reflects the influence (or lack thereof) of Spanish in English ITTL is the use of "petty warfare" instead of "guerrilla", as the Peninsular War was fundamentally different . I hadn't thought much about it before, but it feels right that with more successful Spanish American countries ITTL, the status of Spanish is more akin to OTL French, regarded as a more prestigious language and less a working class language in the United States (which has a significantly lower Spanish American population owing to less push factors and a bigger European immigrational stream).
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019 at 12:13 PM
  4. ruth 高い城の女

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    What a neat idea! It's always fascinating to see how the prestige of a language can just as much result in not loaning a word to another language. OTL French, while not a global lingua franca, is the clear language of administration and education/second language of choice in many areas such as its former colonies in West Africa. Does Spanish have that kind of relationship with any places? Or is English still insidiously dominant? :p
     
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  5. Onerom Orchard Lord

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    Well, NE world is multipolar, unlike ours, and languages reflect that. English is the primus inter pares among international languages owing to the fact that two of the Great Powers (the most powerful two, in fact) the United Kingdom and the United States, are anglophone, so in world wide events English is the preferred language.

    The second most prestigious language is considered to be German, due to the German Empire being a behemoth of continental Europe. It is able to rivalize with English as a scientific language, similarly to its position in OTL a hunder years ago, and it's the preferred second-language in Central, Northern and Eastern Europe and the former German African colonial empire, as well as the German diaspora in the Americas.

    The third would be the French, but it's importance in international communication has been decreasing since the Great War, superseded by English and German. It carries over the prestige of having been THE language of dimplomacy, but nowadays it's restricted to the French colonial empire, New French dispora on Canada and the Maritime Union and non-German continental Europe (Spain, Italy, Greece...)

    From this point on there's no objective classification. Italian is important because of the greater influence of TTL Italy, but paralells French in that is not much useful outside the direct area of Italian influence. Spanish, as I've pointed, is more valued because there are significant Spanish-speaking countries, so if you wanna do bussiness in Latin America you need Spanish (English penetration there is reduced compared to OTL). Phillipines needs a mention too, since it is a Spanish-speaking republic among the lines of the Latin American ones, so Spanish has a foothold in Asia too. Portuguese is mostly like IOTL, although in Brazil Spanish is more valued.

    Japanese is also an important language in Asia, but due to its "alienness", penetration in the West is very limited. Russian too could be considered an international language, due to the sizable Russian diaspora and the hugeness of the Russian Republic, but again it is of limited penetration in the West. Arabic is one the official languages of the Ottoman Empire, and among the Arab world and diaspora, so it is important too.
     
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  6. Threadmarks: Europe at the dawn of the Great War, 1906

    Onerom Orchard Lord

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    [​IMG]

    "An entire generation butchered, just because we wanted a splendid little war". - Napoleon IV, former Emperor of the French, in his Belgian exile.​
     
  7. Galactic Mercenary Member

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    Feb 24, 2018
    Did the UK form an Imperial Federation of some kind, Dominion involvment in defence and foreign policy?
     
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  8. Onerom Orchard Lord

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    Yes, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Ireland and Overseas Dominions (is that a plausible name?) functions as a kind of federation in all but name, with a parliament in Westminster where MP's from all territories discuss external policy, defense and other supraterritorial affairs, while the individual territories posses their own parliaments (in some cases, federal parliaments with provincial assemblies below) for internal affairs.

    It didn't arise from attempts at federalizing the empire, but as a consequence of the sucess of the Irish and Scottish home rule bills passed in the 1910s, that granted internal autonomy to them while maintaining representation at Westminster. Colonies under responsible governments begun to demand a similar arrangement instead of heading towards independence, and by the 1930s many achieved it. The lack of a "blood baptism" for colonial troops in WWI (and Second Boer War before) also meant a decreased national consciousness and a much more widespread "overseas Briton" mentality, coupled with the UK not bankrupting itself fighting two world wars and remaining a global Great Power making staying in the empire beneficial.
     
  9. Gabingston Well-Known Member

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    Minnesota
    Botswana looks like an empty space on the map.
     
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