No Evsei Liberman - earlier collapse of the USSR?

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by MrHola, Mar 4, 2009.

  1. MrHola Banned

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    "Evsei Liberman (Russian: Евсей Либерман; 2 December189711 November 1983) was a Sovieteconomist who lived in Slavuta (Ukraine) and in Moscow (Russia).
    He was a teacher at the Institutes of Work and Technology and at the University of Kharkov. He proposed implanting new methods of planning based on the principles of new democratic centralism. His dissertation took form in "Plan, benefit and prisms" published in Pravda (1962). This became a basis for the Soviet reforms of 1965.
    His most outstanding works were "Structure of the balance of an industrial company" (1948), "Means to raise the profitability of the socialistic companies" (1956), "Analysis of the use of resources" (1963), "Plan and benefits for the Soviet economy" (1965) and "Planning of the socialism" (1967).
    Liberman was very influential. His economic reforms successfully revived the economy of the Soviet Union during the 1960s. Liberman's reform proposals were also implemented in East Germany. It has been argued that if he had not influenced reform in these countries, the economic situation would have deteriorated drastically, as the standard of living and the economy were stagnating."

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    Let's say Liberman dies earlier (OTL, he died in 1983). So, what are the effects on an earlier economic collapse? Will the Soviet Union collapse?
     
  2. CanadianGoose Banned

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    I would say that oil prices did much more to prolong USSR's being than half-assed and partially rolled back 1965 reforms. So the answer is "unlikely".
     
  3. RGB Unqueering the Academia

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    I was just about to say - oil in Tyumen was probably more important than the reforms.

    That said, the collapse was as much a lack of political will as economic lowpoint. I don't think that without taking that component into view you have a satisfactory POD.