New York Thinks Big

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by kernals12, Oct 22, 2019.

  1. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    I think someone else would discover tetraethyl lead in the hunt for ways to engines more efficient. Even so, that would only replace the 1945-1980 decline and 1980-present revival with flat population. People really did not like the city life and once the suburbs became available they went for it.
     
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  2. History Learner Well-Known Member

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    Someone else came up with a good idea further down in that same thread:
    Flat population, growing once again after 1980, is far better than OTL.
     
  3. M79 Well-Known Member

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    If New York City continues to grow the upstate and potentially Long Island may feel they have no real voice in state government. In addition if the City keeps growing into Jersey they might decide to push for City addresses and services.
     
  4. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    I've only given New York City an extra 1.5 million people and maybe 3 million more to the whole metro area.
     
  5. MattII Well-Known Member

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    They might do, or they might discover another anti-knock agent.
     
  6. M79 Well-Known Member

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    So the ratio of NYC/NY State goes from 8.5/19.5 to 10/21. But if there's more of NYC to love maybe Secaucus et al (build the train extension PLEASE!) also join in...?
     
  7. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    Harvey Wiley Corbett outlined the idea of separating vehicles and pedestrians. When combined with underpasses at each intersection, it would turn every city street into a 6 lane speedway all while keeping pedestrians completely safe. In addition, there'd be arcades that would keep these elevated sidewalks sheltered from weather. Screen Shot 2019-10-22 at 8.55.29 PM.png
    Such a plan would've been far too expensive to retrofit for existing streets but for brand new ones, like on the reclaimed land, it would be absolutely awesome.
     
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  8. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    Why would Hudson County residents want to join? All it would do is raise their taxes.
     
  9. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    There were other ways to raise gasoline octane, but they were all more expensive.
     
  10. marathag Well-Known Member with a target on his back

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    Not so much as efficient, but a cheap additive to prevent knock by mimicking higher octane fuel, that in the late 1920s, meant 70+ Octane

    The decade before, the Model T had 4:1 Compression so it could run on straight run Gasoline or 'White Gas' that was Naphtha or 'Drip' from natural gas condensation, with low octane rates under 50, hardly better than Kerosene.

    But Catalytic Reforming was expensive, sme for using higher grade 'Sweet' Crude Oil as the base for refining.

    Rather than TEL, Some used Benzol, a byproduct from Coke and Coal gasification works that was mostly Benzene that has a rating of 114, but a number of other disadvantages besides cost.
     
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  11. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    Knocking forces you to run your engine at a lower compression ratio, which hurts efficiency. So lead, by preventing knocking, allowed the engines to be more efficient.
     
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  12. DominusNovus Humbled by Fate

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    I think the Brooklyn Bridge would be kept on historic architectural grounds alone. Perhaps even as a glorified bypass. Imagine it, with development underneath and skyscrapers on either side.
     
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  13. marathag Well-Known Member with a target on his back

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    TEL was the cheapest way to get to that point, plus had the upside of lubricating valves. And did I mention cheap?
    Downside was it was hard on spark plugs, and was an aerosolized heavy metal poison.
     
  14. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    It's weird that we think of overpasses as eyesores but bridges as architectural marvels.
    But I don't see any practical reason to keep it. There'd be no connection to the Pan Manhattan Expressway.
     
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  15. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    I lied, I decided to fix the Bay Area.
     
  16. DominusNovus Humbled by Fate

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    Because overpasses are eyesoars and bridges often are architectural marvels. Anyway, the Brooklyn Bridge really is a piece of engineering history. I think it would be kept.
     
  17. TripleCitizen Well-Known Member

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    Just because something is an architectural achievement and and feat of engineering doesn’t justify it hindering progress.
     
  18. kernals12 Proudly on the Autism Spectrum

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    Were people really big on historical preservation in the 30s?
     
  19. James Ricker Own your mistakes

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    The mayor of Manhattan pretty much runs the place like it is a separate state in the governor of New York doesn't like it because the mayor pretty much can.
     
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  20. b0ned0me Well-Known Member

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    It’s worth pointing out that the early history of TEL was very sketchy indeed, with numerous poisoning deaths among the workers at the first ethyl plants (the ‘House of Butterflies’) and people handling the stuff which led to bans in some states. It pretty much squeaked through curtesy of some extremely unethical promotional practices including Midgely doing a demonstration of its “safety” and then rushing off for secret treatment of lead poisoning. Its one of those topics where a crusading politician could make a great name for themselves in banning the stuff.
    As for replacing it, there were other alternatives they just weren’t competitive with TEL provided one assigned a cost of $0 to the massive health costs of TEL. Recognise those costs and TEL is out of the picture long before it becomes embedded as the industry staple.

    https://www.pittmed.health.pitt.edu/story/houses-butterflies