Minutia: A History for Anticosti

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by The Majesty, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. The Majesty Conlanger

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Hello for the first time! A while ago I discovered that Anticosti Island is reasonably bland IOTL. So, I decided to make a little timeline to make it a bit more interesting. Enjoy!

    Go Habs Go!
    On November 29, 1937, international journalist William Glyn realised upon arrival at the Québec/Ontario border that he had forgotten his wallet at his home in Toronto and he would be delayed his journey to Montréal. A shame, really, because the Canadiens had done so incredibly well this season! Five wins and no losses! There was much rejoicing throughout the city, even into the first week of December. The headlines in the papers all professed their local pride, and not one of them had any mention of an otherwise suspicious exchange that was taking place...

    December 24, 1937, after much discussion and planning, the ownership of Anticosti Island, a small logging outpost of the Consolidated Paper Corporation ltd., was given over to a small group of German scientists, claiming to the few that asked that they were representatives of a private German company looking into more efficient pulping methods. The leaders of the group were Capt. Mueller and Dr. Wollert. That night, they sent a letter describing their success to the Fuhrer. What a nice Christmas present.

    The existing mill at Port-Menier, the major settlement on the island, was renovated and expanded, as well as several other buildings around the town. A few German immigrants arrived, some to work at the mill and others to fish. The Germans took up headquarters in the magnificent Villa Menier.

    [​IMG]

    After a small addition to the existing railroad, a sulphite mill was created in late January 1938 at the other end of the island, in the new settlement named Shotbuck (the frontman for the officers' plan had advised them to steer clear of German names, as this would raise suspicion. They had initially named it Ostbucht) at Baie du Renard. Advertisements were put out in Gaspé and Newfoundland, promising a part in the grand development of the island, a picturesque "Island of Eden, unsoiled by Man", so claimed one flier. The settlement grew to a population of 94 by March, again including several German immigrants and-- unknown to most-- 3 U-boats, which remained stationed a bit down the coast from Shotbuck. They were U-20, U-21, and U-23, referred to jokingly by high-ranking officers as the Antikostimarine.

    As a result of the growth in Shotbuck and Port-Menier, a much smaller outpost was developed at the eastern tip of the island, called Pointe Mérimac. It soon became the major logging hotspot, providing the raw materials for the mills. A lighthouse and train station were also built here. The laying down of a second track of rail began in May 1938, with the total population of the island by summer 1939 a bit less than 350.

    Upon Canada's declaration of war on 10 September, 1939, the "Antikostimarine" began its operation of raiding Canadian and Newfoundland merchant ships. The two dominions' respective navies send forces to pursue the U-Boats, and the Germans are captured, but not before they raid St.-Pierre et Miquelon, sinking three ships, killing 23 and injuring 30. The islands were occupied by Newfoundland forces, and several hundred Newfoundland Dollars were set aside for rebuilding. The Nazi prisoners were sent to the internment camp in St. John's and eventually executed.

    Anticosti Island was seized by the Canadian Government. Mackenzie King ordered the creation of a military base on the island, to also serve as an internment camp for those proven to be Nazi officers and any German civilian of the island who refused to comply with Canadian instruction. It was named Fort King, and it was built on the railroad, so as to monitor land traffic (a train station was built), and on Pointe Carleton, so as to monitor traffic in the Jacques-Cartier Strait (a lighthouse was also built). All in all, 32 people were imprisoned in Fort King, Capt. Mueller, Dr. Wollert, and their initial associates were all executed.

    Due to the imprisonment of more than 5% of the population of the island, and conscription now applying to the inhabitants, the economy of the island began to drop. German immigrants lobbied the Prime Minister to release the prisoners, declaring that they needed more working men. Mackenzie King had other things on his mind.

    Meanwhile, newspapers across Canada, Newfoundland, the US, and the UK were reeling from the scandal of it all. "Anticosti, Kleindeutschland" ("Anticosti, Little Germany") ran the headline of the Montréal Gazette, which detailed the recent events concerning the island. It fuelled a powerful propaganda poster explosion, increased Canadian pro-war sentiment, and also sparked a boom in immigration to the island, of people interested in the scandal.

    [​IMG]

    Anticosti's population at the end of the Second World War was 436. The second track of the railroad was finished in 1946 (the construction having been halted during the war due to the internment of those overseeing the building and several of the track-layers), and extended down the south coast to the newly constructed Fort d'Assomption, built at the mouth of the Rivière Jupiter, for several reasons: symmetry, as a logging outpost for Port-Menier, for easier access to the river, and for surveillance of the Honguedo Strait.

    Fort d'Assomption received an influx of immigration in the 1960s when oil deposits were discovered around the river. There was much activism from the game hunters, but all for nought.

    And that's all I have to say on the matter.
     
  2. The Majesty Conlanger

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Nothing? I recognize that it's not a very well-known/interesting place, but any comments on the timeline?
     
  3. edvardas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2011
    anticostiger

    This is my take on Anticosti.
    With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the manchurian tiger became gravely threatened. There was a less effective government to guard against poachers, and the tigers were too close to the Chinese market. Since the Russian government was perennialy short of cash, Yeltsin decided to sell the tigers to Canada. Since Anticosti had a very similar climate to the Amur region, they decided that it would be an ideal habitat for the tigers.
    Since there was little or no farming, the authorities did not have any livestock to guard. If a tiger managed to swim across to the north shore, or walk over the ice in winter, not to worry. Ther was no farnland for hundreds of miles. But if a tiger was able to get to farmland, a hunter could shoot it on site.
    Anticosti naturally became a tourist attraction. A safari to see big cats was less than a thousand miles from New York or Toronto, and a litle bit farther from Chicago. This was thousands of miles closer than Asia or Africa, and 2,000 miles closer than any jaguars in Central America. Another advantage was that one did not ahave to get a passport, let alone a visa. And while the mosquitoes could be bad, one did not have to worry about tropical diseases.
     
  4. Marc Pasquin 43 % pure, 57 % recycled sins

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Location:
    I live in da land down unda'
    While I applaud you for trying to develop a little used place, considering you posted this in the "After 1900" and not the "Alien Space Bats" section, I must say that I have difficulties believing that in 1937 the Canadian government would keep silent about an island placed like this being leased to germans without a torough background check as well as getting a bit antsy if the place started to attract a large number of germans.
     
  5. Enigmajones Ours Is The Fury

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Location:
    Look behind you
    I think they would have been fine with it, if only for finally having a place to dump Adrien Arcand.
     
  6. Marc Pasquin 43 % pure, 57 % recycled sins

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Location:
    I live in da land down unda'
    That made me giggle.

    The idea of Anticosti's blueshirts trying to perform an anschluss on the rest of Canada would actualy make for an hilarious ATL. Maybe the Royal Newfounland Air Force might be involved somehow.
     
  7. Enigmajones Ours Is The Fury

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Location:
    Look behind you
    Fuck, I wish Ian would unban MacCauly so we could get the "Newfie Invasion of Anticosti".
     
  8. Marc Pasquin 43 % pure, 57 % recycled sins

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Location:
    I live in da land down unda'
    Lets just rustle-up those cannucks with some military knowledge and go for it.
     
  9. Enigmajones Ours Is The Fury

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Location:
    Look behind you
    You get the Canucks, I'll get the Whiskey and a devil may care attitude...
     
  10. The Majesty Conlanger

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    My understanding was that the island was under the private ownership of the Consolidated Paper Corp., and so not directly involved with the Canadian Government. Yeah, I can definitely see now how having mass migrations of Germans in 1938 is unlikely to go unnoticed. Do you really think it's too ASB?
     
  11. Marc Pasquin 43 % pure, 57 % recycled sins

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    Location:
    I live in da land down unda'
    the problem is mostly strategic. while western countries were willing to pretend that there was such a thing as an independent corporation in germany when it suited their needs, it was quite clear to all that it would ultimately be controled by the party.

    This mean that this would allow anticosti to fall under the control of a country which had developed as of late a nasty habit of taking over (or trying to take over) its neighbours. Considering anticosti is at the entrance of the st. Lawrence river, that's not something you want.

    That being said, ASB doesn't have to be bad. Just maybe push your POD further back and use a liberal amount of handwavium: In the late 19th century, you would have had some chain immigration from Germany to Anticosti to work as lumberjacks. By the interbellum period, you would have a large enough population which becomes enamoured with their version of The Bund and go from there.