Merrily We Roll Along: A Post-1969 History of Looney Tunes


Pinwheel, Nickel Flicks, and America Goes Bananaz are virtually identical to IOTL. For those not in the know, Pinwheel is a Sesame Street clone, featuring puppets and humans living together in a house, featuring preschool-appropriate short films from around the world. Nickel Flicks, hosted by John Moschitta, Jr. in his first on-camera role, showcases cliffhanger serials, one-reel comedies, and silent short films. The mild violence in these films isn't censored, even advertised as kids' programming "with no sugar-coating". IOTL, this led to an early cancellation; ITTL, it's not even the only "violent" series on the schedule. America Goes Bananaz, previously the QUBE series Columbus Goes Bananaz, is a teenage-oriented variety series, mixing more comedic segments with serious discussions about topics like drugs and birth control, in a way to both entertain and educate its teenage audience.
Good vision, but if the channel is called “Kaleidoscope”, then why is “Nickel Flicks” not changed?
 
View attachment 913628
Launch Date: April 1, 1979
Owners: Warner Communications (50%), American Broadcasting Company (25%), Hearst Corporation (25%)
Founder: Dr. Vivian Horner

Having started out life as the C-3/Pinwheel channel on Warner's experiental QUBE service in Columbus, Ohio, Kaleidoscope is the equivalent of OTL's Nickelodeon. However, there are several key differences, due to being conceived of for a national channel slightly earlier (when QUBE and the original C-3 was in development).

For one, the name Nickelodeon was quickly rejected for being long and cumbersome for a kid to say, too obscure for a kid to know what it is, and what the word actually means (a movie theater for the price of a nickel) being too antequated for a modern audience. While the word Kaleidoscope was no less long and cumbersome, kaleidoscopes had been popular children's toys for years, and had been experiencing a renaissance in the late 70s. Plus, it was more fun to say. So the name became Kaleidoscope. As such, instead of the "mime" routine done in Nickelodeon's bumpers IOTL, the bumpers were kaleidoscope footage with trippy yet soothing Moog music, with the logo Scanimated in.

Second, ABC and Hearst are involved. As a result, ARTS also launches two years earlier than IOTL, taking up the nighttime hours when kids are asleep. Of note, Hearst already had relationships with Warner Communications, with their King Features subsidiary having a stake in the Warner Cartoon Group.

Third and most importantly, while IOTL Nickelodeon was made up primarily of educational series and exclusively of low-budget originals (even if three of them were ported from QUBE, and one of them was basically just old DC Comics being read to you), the efforts of Penelope Koshkin to include more entertaining programs resulted in a mixture between two types of programs, both designed to appeal to the parents buying the cable packages with the network on it- educational series parents can feel good about, and classic series that parents grew up with and trust. As such, there's a lot more reruns on this channel, and a lot more Warner and ABC cartoons on even the original shows. Speaking of which...

SERIES​

Again, like Nickelodeon IOTL, much of Kaleidoscope's original programming were "package shows"- made up of existing content, usually with some framing device.

Pinwheel, Nickel Flicks, and America Goes Bananaz are virtually identical to IOTL. For those not in the know, Pinwheel is a Sesame Street clone, featuring puppets and humans living together in a house, featuring preschool-appropriate short films from around the world. Nickel Flicks, hosted by John Moschitta, Jr. in his first on-camera role, showcases cliffhanger serials, one-reel comedies, and silent short films. The mild violence in these films isn't censored, even advertised as kids' programming "with no sugar-coating". IOTL, this led to an early cancellation; ITTL, it's not even the only "violent" series on the schedule. America Goes Bananaz, previously the QUBE series Columbus Goes Bananaz, is a teenage-oriented variety series, mixing more comedic segments with serious discussions about topics like drugs and birth control, in a way to both entertain and educate its teenage audience.

Hocus Focus debuts early in the place of By the Way, and also contains no animated segments. Hocus Focus is about young wizard Krypsen (Brad Williams) being transported from medieval times into the modern day, and having to learn about the modern world through educational filmstrips and shorts, while shenanigans ensue.

DC Comics Presents airs in the place of Video Comics. ABC's deal with NBC to air Wonder Woman while NBC airs Justice League is altered for Kaleidoscope, allowing the network to include series starring classical superheroes like Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman (an advantage IOTL's Video Comics did not have). The heart of the series is still the "video comics"- readings of DC comic books while the pages appear on screen, early motion comics in a sense. These were made in order to help kids to read. However, only one of these is shown per episode, with the remainder of the runtime being short DC cartoons made pre-Justice League, such as Filmation's DC cartoons of the 1960s and the public domain Fleischer Superman cartoons.

Cartoon Studio is a completely new package series for this TL, being made up of, well... short cartoons, with a framing device of short comedic skits set inside the Warner Bros. Animation studios. Of course, you have Warner Cartoon Group shorts. Looney Tunes and the like were abundant, specifically of those not airing on The Bugs Bunny Show. Alongside rotating shorts seen in syndicated packages, permanent inclusions included old black and white shorts and their 1968 colorizations, the 1964-1970 "dark age" of shorts from DePatie-Freleng and Seven Arts, public domain cartoons, and- most controversially- the Chuck Jones shorts (through Koshkin giving her personal OK with airing them, and with the exception of the still off-limits Pepe Le Pew). They also provided old Jay Ward series, such as Rocky and Bullwinkle and George of the Jungle, as well as the related Underdog. General Mills, however, still had the distribution rights to much of the Jay Ward catalog- in exchange for airing these shows on the commercial-free Kaleidoscope, General Mills' Program Exchange (a barter service who provided shows for free in exchange for ad time) would take over local syndication of Looney Tunes shorts and various other WB animated series, and provide PSAs on healthy eating to the network.

Hearst's inclusion... isn't exactly meaningful, since King Features already had a stake in the Warner Cartoon Group, but they did sorta provide cartoons like Popeye and Beetle Bailey. ABC is more significant in their additions, specifically with the classic shorts seen on The Tom and Jerry Show- specifically, Hanna-Barbera characters like Tom and Jerry, Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, and the like. Spoiler alert, but ABC would also air The New Casper Show on Saturdays starting in the fall, and as a result would air classic Harvey shorts starring Casper and the gang at launch. Looney Tunes, Tom and Jerry, Yogi Bear, Rocky and Bullwinkle, Casper, Popeye... Cartoon Studio is a veritable heaven for fans of classic cartoons.

But wait! Modern cartoons also have a spot on Cartoon Studio. Mostly educational series, as non-classics on Kaleidoscope are- such WB's Jeanie the Genius and similar segments (such as Time Flies and Choo-Choo Jones) and ABC's Schoolhouse Rock and Time for Timer (both from Warner Cartoon Group). The series also included the animated shorts found IOTL on By the Way and later Hocus Focus, probably those rejected by Pinwheel but still put to good use here. And, of course, more public domain shorts OUTSIDE of Warner Cartoon Group's purview (even including the odd Mickey Mouse short that fell into PD). However, Blaze the Princess Dragon, the modern, non-educational Jay Ward series, also made its way here, for a batshit insane reason... as new Blaze segments were currently being made for The Rocky and Bullwinkle Hour on NBC, Blaze was now a part of Rocky and Bullwinkle in the same vein as Dudley Do-Right or, until recently, Peabody's Improbably Histories. I know, S-tier bullshittery.

Aside from its "original"/package series, Kaleidoscope aired reruns of pre-existing non-short shows, mainly "retro" (10+ years old) ones. WB provided Kimba the White Lion, Speed Racer, and Ultraman, while ABC provided Scooby-Doo, Where Are You? and American Bandstand. And inherited from QUBE was... Doctor Who, of all shows. (This was back when people on both sides of the pond saw it as a kids show, though Kaleidoscope positioned it as a show for teenagers.) Provided by Time-Life, Doctor Who did originate in 1963, thus meeting the 10+ year threshold for "retro" content, but the package used by QUBE was Time-Life's failed package of serials featuring the Third Doctor, Jon Pertwee, rather than the First (William Hartnell) or Second (Patrick Troughton) Doctors that met the "retro" feel and even had multiple educational historical stories. And while Blaze's inclusion as a Rocky and Bullwinkle character meant that more modern episodes of "older" shows would squeak by on Kaleidoscope, not only did Kaleidoscope continue to not use the First and Second Doctor episodes, but they upgraded their syndicated package from the Third Doctor to Time-Life's newer package, starring the then-current Fourth Doctor, Tom Baker! More S-tier bullshittery here.

DAILY SCHEDULE​

Kaliedoscope targeted kids 6-11 from 7-9 AM and 2:30-7 PM, preschoolers from 9 AM-2:30 PM, and teenagers from 7-10 PM.

7 AM: Kimba the White Lion
7:30-8:30 AM: Cartoon Studio
8:30 AM: Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?
9 AM-2:30 PM: Pinwheel
2:30-3:30 PM: Cartoon Studio
3:30 PM: Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?
4 PM: Hocus Focus
5 PM: DC Comics Presents
5:30 PM: Speed Racer
6 PM: Kimba the White Lion
6:30 PM: Nickel Flicks
7 PM: American Bandstand
8 PM: America Goes Bananaz
9 PM: Ultraman
9:30 PM: Doctor Who

Kaleidoscope, while still being made as a "loss leader" (read: not meant to make a profit) in order to sell cable packages, was fairly successful- MUCH moreso than early Nickelodeon IOTL. This is primarily due to the addition of entertainment-based programs suggested by Koshkin, and especially the combined marketing muscle of Bugs Bunny, Scooby-Doo, and Superman pushing the channel, though educational originals Pinwheel and America Goes Bananaz were also hits for the channel.​
Maybe they don't end up selling it off to Viacom
 
Good vision, but if the channel is called “Kaleidoscope”, then why is “Nickel Flicks” not changed?
Whoops. Maybe they do keep the 1920s aesthetic for there, seeing as how much of their content for Nickel Flicks came from that time period. Instead of tying into the channel name it’s a throwback to how movies used to cost a nickel (and also an Easter egg toward the rejected name)
Maybe they don't end up selling it off to Viacom
That’s the plan
 
View attachment 913628
Launch Date: April 1, 1979
Owners: Warner Communications (50%), American Broadcasting Company (25%), Hearst Corporation (25%)
Founder: Dr. Vivian Horner

Having started out life as the C-3/Pinwheel channel on Warner's experiental QUBE service in Columbus, Ohio, Kaleidoscope is the equivalent of OTL's Nickelodeon. However, there are several key differences, due to being conceived of for a national channel slightly earlier (when QUBE and the original C-3 was in development).

For one, the name Nickelodeon was quickly rejected for being long and cumbersome for a kid to say, too obscure for a kid to know what it is, and what the word actually means (a movie theater for the price of a nickel) being too antequated for a modern audience. While the word Kaleidoscope was no less long and cumbersome, kaleidoscopes had been popular children's toys for years, and had been experiencing a renaissance in the late 70s. Plus, it was more fun to say. So the name became Kaleidoscope. As such, instead of the "mime" routine done in Nickelodeon's bumpers IOTL, the bumpers were kaleidoscope footage with trippy yet soothing Moog music, with the logo Scanimated in.

Second, ABC and Hearst are involved. As a result, ARTS also launches two years earlier than IOTL, taking up the nighttime hours when kids are asleep. Of note, Hearst already had relationships with Warner Communications, with their King Features subsidiary having a stake in the Warner Cartoon Group.

Third and most importantly, while IOTL Nickelodeon was made up primarily of educational series and exclusively of low-budget originals (even if three of them were ported from QUBE, and one of them was basically just old DC Comics being read to you), the efforts of Penelope Koshkin to include more entertaining programs resulted in a mixture between two types of programs, both designed to appeal to the parents buying the cable packages with the network on it- educational series parents can feel good about, and classic series that parents grew up with and trust. As such, there's a lot more reruns on this channel, and a lot more Warner and ABC cartoons on even the original shows. Speaking of which...

SERIES​

Again, like Nickelodeon IOTL, much of Kaleidoscope's original programming were "package shows"- made up of existing content, usually with some framing device.

Pinwheel, Nickel Flicks, and America Goes Bananaz are virtually identical to IOTL. For those not in the know, Pinwheel is a Sesame Street clone, featuring puppets and humans living together in a house, featuring preschool-appropriate short films from around the world. Nickel Flicks, hosted by John Moschitta, Jr. in his first on-camera role, showcases cliffhanger serials, one-reel comedies, and silent short films. The mild violence in these films isn't censored, even advertised as kids' programming "with no sugar-coating". IOTL, this led to an early cancellation; ITTL, it's not even the only "violent" series on the schedule. America Goes Bananaz, previously the QUBE series Columbus Goes Bananaz, is a teenage-oriented variety series, mixing more comedic segments with serious discussions about topics like drugs and birth control, in a way to both entertain and educate its teenage audience.

Hocus Focus debuts early in the place of By the Way, and also contains no animated segments. Hocus Focus is about young wizard Krypsen (Brad Williams) being transported from medieval times into the modern day, and having to learn about the modern world through educational filmstrips and shorts, while shenanigans ensue.

DC Comics Presents airs in the place of Video Comics. ABC's deal with NBC to air Wonder Woman while NBC airs Justice League is altered for Kaleidoscope, allowing the network to include series starring classical superheroes like Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman (an advantage IOTL's Video Comics did not have). The heart of the series is still the "video comics"- readings of DC comic books while the pages appear on screen, early motion comics in a sense. These were made in order to help kids to read. However, only one of these is shown per episode, with the remainder of the runtime being short DC cartoons made pre-Justice League, such as Filmation's DC cartoons of the 1960s and the public domain Fleischer Superman cartoons.

Cartoon Studio is a completely new package series for this TL, being made up of, well... short cartoons, with a framing device of short comedic skits set inside the Warner Bros. Animation studios. Of course, you have Warner Cartoon Group shorts. Looney Tunes and the like were abundant, specifically of those not airing on The Bugs Bunny Show. Alongside rotating shorts seen in syndicated packages, permanent inclusions included old black and white shorts and their 1968 colorizations, the 1964-1970 "dark age" of shorts from DePatie-Freleng and Seven Arts, public domain cartoons, and- most controversially- the Chuck Jones shorts (through Koshkin giving her personal OK with airing them, and with the exception of the still off-limits Pepe Le Pew). They also provided old Jay Ward series, such as Rocky and Bullwinkle and George of the Jungle, as well as the related Underdog. General Mills, however, still had the distribution rights to much of the Jay Ward catalog- in exchange for airing these shows on the commercial-free Kaleidoscope, General Mills' Program Exchange (a barter service who provided shows for free in exchange for ad time) would take over local syndication of Looney Tunes shorts and various other WB animated series, and provide PSAs on healthy eating to the network.

Hearst's inclusion... isn't exactly meaningful, since King Features already had a stake in the Warner Cartoon Group, but they did sorta provide cartoons like Popeye and Beetle Bailey. ABC is more significant in their additions, specifically with the classic shorts seen on The Tom and Jerry Show- specifically, Hanna-Barbera characters like Tom and Jerry, Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, and the like. Spoiler alert, but ABC would also air The New Casper Show on Saturdays starting in the fall, and as a result would air classic Harvey shorts starring Casper and the gang at launch. Looney Tunes, Tom and Jerry, Yogi Bear, Rocky and Bullwinkle, Casper, Popeye... Cartoon Studio is a veritable heaven for fans of classic cartoons.

But wait! Modern cartoons also have a spot on Cartoon Studio. Mostly educational series, as non-classics on Kaleidoscope are- such WB's Jeanie the Genius and similar segments (such as Time Flies and Choo-Choo Jones) and ABC's Schoolhouse Rock and Time for Timer (both from Warner Cartoon Group). The series also included the animated shorts found IOTL on By the Way and later Hocus Focus, probably those rejected by Pinwheel but still put to good use here. And, of course, more public domain shorts OUTSIDE of Warner Cartoon Group's purview (even including the odd Mickey Mouse short that fell into PD). However, Blaze the Princess Dragon, the modern, non-educational Jay Ward series, also made its way here, for a batshit insane reason... as new Blaze segments were currently being made for The Rocky and Bullwinkle Hour on NBC, Blaze was now a part of Rocky and Bullwinkle in the same vein as Dudley Do-Right or, until recently, Peabody's Improbably Histories. I know, S-tier bullshittery.

Aside from its "original"/package series, Kaleidoscope aired reruns of pre-existing non-short shows, mainly "retro" (10+ years old) ones. WB provided Kimba the White Lion, Speed Racer, and Ultraman, while ABC provided Scooby-Doo, Where Are You? and American Bandstand. And inherited from QUBE was... Doctor Who, of all shows. (This was back when people on both sides of the pond saw it as a kids show, though Kaleidoscope positioned it as a show for teenagers.) Provided by Time-Life, Doctor Who did originate in 1963, thus meeting the 10+ year threshold for "retro" content, but the package used by QUBE was Time-Life's failed package of serials featuring the Third Doctor, Jon Pertwee, rather than the First (William Hartnell) or Second (Patrick Troughton) Doctors that met the "retro" feel and even had multiple educational historical stories. And while Blaze's inclusion as a Rocky and Bullwinkle character meant that more modern episodes of "older" shows would squeak by on Kaleidoscope, not only did Kaleidoscope continue to not use the First and Second Doctor episodes, but they upgraded their syndicated package from the Third Doctor to Time-Life's newer package, starring the then-current Fourth Doctor, Tom Baker! More S-tier bullshittery here.

DAILY SCHEDULE​

Kaliedoscope targeted kids 6-11 from 7-9 AM and 2:30-7 PM, preschoolers from 9 AM-2:30 PM, and teenagers from 7-10 PM.

7 AM: Kimba the White Lion
7:30-8:30 AM: Cartoon Studio
8:30 AM: Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?
9 AM-2:30 PM: Pinwheel
2:30-3:30 PM: Cartoon Studio
3:30 PM: Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?
4 PM: Hocus Focus
5 PM: DC Comics Presents
5:30 PM: Speed Racer
6 PM: Kimba the White Lion
6:30 PM: Nickel Flicks
7 PM: American Bandstand
8 PM: America Goes Bananaz
9 PM: Ultraman
9:30 PM: Doctor Who

Kaleidoscope, while still being made as a "loss leader" (read: not meant to make a profit) in order to sell cable packages, was fairly successful- MUCH moreso than early Nickelodeon IOTL. This is primarily due to the addition of entertainment-based programs suggested by Koshkin, and especially the combined marketing muscle of Bugs Bunny, Scooby-Doo, and Superman pushing the channel, though educational originals Pinwheel and America Goes Bananaz were also hits for the channel.​
If Kaleidoscope has Warner bros stuff do they still get British cartoons like bananaman, count duckula and danger mouse? Will double dare still be a thing too?
 
What's mirror man?

Assuming it's the same show, It's a tokusatsu show made by tsuburaya production in the early 70s, it similar to ultraman but with a more darker tone.

And who's Technoman? @Tacomaster

I think it tekkaman and assuming it s the same show, it's a scifi superhero anime made by tatsunoko production in the 70s, from what I read online it was suppose to run 52 episodes, but due to low ratings it ended at 26 episodes and with a cliff hanger.
 
If Kaleidoscope has Warner bros stuff do they still get British cartoons like bananaman, count duckula and danger mouse? Will double dare still be a thing too?
Yep
Assuming it's the same show, It's a tokusatsu show made by tsuburaya production in the early 70s, it similar to ultraman but with a more darker tone.
Yep. Rising Sun has gotten into pairing other tokusatsu shows with Ultraman
I think it tekkaman and assuming it s the same show, it's a scifi superhero anime made by tatsunoko production in the 70s, from what I read online it was suppose to run 52 episodes, but due to low ratings it ended at 26 episodes and with a cliff hanger.
Pretty much. Though now that you said that, I’m thinking it’ll also be a WB coproduction, with WB helping Tatsunoko finish the remaining 52 episodes.
 
1979 TV - NBC Saturday Morning
8.jpg

8:00 AM - The Wonderful World of Mickey Mouse (Walt Disney Productions)
Expanded to an hour.

32.jpg

9:00 AM - The Woody Woodpecker Show (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions) - reruns
No changes.

Image 6.jpeg
Image 7.jpeg

Mind the designs here, I made these back in 2020, so they're more rough designs than anything.
9:30 AM - Robo-Riley (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation) - new show!
Created by Penelope Koshkin in an effort to create more notable female cartoon stars. The titular robot, Robo-Riley- er, just Riley (an acronym for Robotic Intelligent Lifeform Emulating Youth) is created as the daughter for the brilliant Dr. Denshi and his family. Disguising herself as a human outside the Denshi home, the super-powered yet naive Riley must learn to navigate the human world, with her sardonic but wise human brother Jack by her side. But they also have to keep her true nature a secret, which won't be easy, especially with nosy newshounds and fellow students, brother-and-sister duo Scoop (outspoken sister) and Snap (silent photographer brother), who look to expose Riley's robotic true identity. Oh, who am I kidding? Of course it'll be easy- these two are the "Wile E. Coyote" and "Elmer Fudd" of the show.

In an attempt to curb allegations of racism levied against WB after the Cosby controversy, Riley's holographic human disguise and the rest of her human family are all Japanese, inspired by Japan's growing dominance in the field of technology (with "Denshi" even being the Japanese word for "electronic"). Even better, they're played almost completely non-stereotypically, with the closest things to problematic elements being their yellow-ish skin and them all having dot eyes (even Riley's human form, though her glasses kind of disguise this) while all other human characters have more traditional full eyes.

Dracula-cartoon-1024x600.jpg.webp

I haven't gotten any drawings for the characters, so let's just say that this is Dracula.
10:00 AM - Monster Mash-Up (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions, Krofft Entertainment)
Final season- the show was growing stale at this point.

1f2044d09f9b49984bdc8ccb6efe96fa.jpg

10:30 AM - Manta and Moray (Paramount Television, Filmation)
IOTL, DC Comics successfully sued Filmation over this show, claiming it to infringe on the trademark of Aquaman, citing the original plans for it to actually BE an Aquaman show before plans between DC and Filmation fell through. In this timeline, however, a mix of the differences in plot (both the ones added ITTL and the ones from IOTL), the bringing up of Marvel's Namor the Sub-Mariner coming BEFORE Aquaman, and the assumption that kids were smart enough to actually tell the difference. (I mean, come ON! Does THAT look like Aquaman to you?) Plus, ITTL, Manta and Moray was never meant to be a DC tie-in show, as DC was kinda joined at the hip with the Warner Cartoon Group, giving Manta and Moray another advantage- though it should be noted it WAS meant to be a more traditional superhero-ish show like IOTL before Paramount bought Filmation and Ralph Bakshi took the reins.

sddefault.jpg

11:00 AM - Justice League (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation, DC Comics)
No changes.

12:00 PM - Thunderbirds (ITC Entertainment, Henson Associates) - new show??? but one that had been running for a year at this point before new episodes
After last year's successful addition of Thunderbirds reruns to the Saturday morning schedule AND Jim Henson's successful revival of fellow Supermarionation series Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons for primetime, ITC and NBC put two and two together and greenlit a revival of Thunderbirds, with Jim Henson once again taking the lead, and series creator Gerry Anderson once again taking an advisory role.

Even though they lost Godzilla to the primetime lineup and were about to lose the aging Monster Mash-Up, the combination of new Thunderbirds episodes, rising stars Manta and Moray, and newcomer Robo-Riley proved just the shot in the arm NBC needed to get back on track- and the continued success of Justice League didn't hurt, either!​
 
Last edited:
8.jpg

8:00 AM - The Wonderful World of Mickey Mouse (Walt Disney Productions)
Expanded to an hour.

32.jpg

9:00 AM - The Woody Woodpecker Show (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions) - reruns
No changes.

View attachment 913786 View attachment 913787
Mind the designs here, I made these back in 2020, so they're more rough designs than anything.
9:30 AM - Robo-Riley (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation) - new show!
Created by Penelope Koshkin in an effort to create more notable female cartoon stars. The titular robot, Robo-Riley- er, just Riley (an acronym for Robotic Intelligent Lifeform Emulating Youth) is created as the daughter for the brilliant Dr. Denshi and his family. Disguising herself as a human outside the Denshi home, the super-powered yet naive Riley must learn to navigate the human world, with her sardonic but wise human brother Jack by her side. But they also have to keep her true nature a secret, which won't be easy, especially with nosy newshounds and fellow students, brother-and-sister duo Scoop (outspoken sister) and Snap (silent photographer brother), who look to expose Riley's robotic true identity. Oh, who am I kidding? Of course it'll be easy- these two are the "Wile E. Coyote" and "Elmer Fudd" of the show.

In an attempt to curb allegations of racism levied against WB after the Cosby controversy, Riley's holographic human disguise and the rest of her human family are all Japanese, inspired by Japan's growing dominance in the field of technology (with "Denshi" even being the Japanese word for "electronic"). Even better, they're played almost completely non-stereotypically, with the closest things to problematic elements being their yellow-ish skin and them all having dot eyes (even Riley's human form, though her glasses kind of disguise this) while all other human characters have more traditional full eyes.

Dracula-cartoon-1024x600.jpg.webp

I haven't gotten any drawings for the characters, so let's just say that this is Dracula.
10:00 AM - Monster Mash-Up (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions, Krofft Entertainment)
Final season- the show was growing stale at this point.

1f2044d09f9b49984bdc8ccb6efe96fa.jpg

10:30 AM - Manta and Moray (Paramount Television, Filmation)
IOTL, DC Comics successfully sued Filmation over this show, claiming it to infringe on the trademark of Aquaman, citing the original plans for it to actually BE an Aquaman show before plans between DC and Filmation fell through. In this timeline, however, a mix of the differences in plot (both the ones added ITTL and the ones from IOTL), the bringing up of Marvel's Namor the Sub-Mariner coming BEFORE Aquaman, and the assumption that kids were smart enough to actually tell the difference. (I mean, come ON! Does THAT look like Aquaman to you?) Plus, ITTL, Manta and Moray was never meant to be a DC tie-in show, as DC was kinda joined at the hip with the Warner Cartoon Group, giving Manta and Moray another advantage- though it should be noted it WAS meant to be a more traditional superhero-ish show like IOTL before Paramount bought Filmation and Ralph Bakshi took the reins.

sddefault.jpg

11:00 AM - Justice League (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation)
No changes.

12:00 PM - Thunderbirds (ITC Entertainment, Henson Associates) - new show??? but one that had been running for a year at this point before new episodes
After last year's successful addition of Thunderbirds reruns to the Saturday morning schedule AND Jim Henson's successful revival of fellow Supermarionation series Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons for primetime, ITC and NBC put two and two together and greenlit a revival of Thunderbirds, with Jim Henson once again taking the lead, and series creator Gerry Anderson once again taking an advisory role.

Even though they lost Godzilla to the primetime lineup and were about to lose the aging Monster Mash-Up, the combination of new Thunderbirds episodes, rising stars Manta and Moray, and newcomer Robo-Riley proved just the shot in the arm NBC needed to get back on track- and the continued success of Justice League didn't hurt, either!​
Isn’t the threadmark supposed to mean “1979 TV - NBC Saturday Morning”?
 
8.jpg

8:00 AM - The Wonderful World of Mickey Mouse (Walt Disney Productions)
Expanded to an hour.

32.jpg

9:00 AM - The Woody Woodpecker Show (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions) - reruns
No changes.

View attachment 913786 View attachment 913787
Mind the designs here, I made these back in 2020, so they're more rough designs than anything.
9:30 AM - Robo-Riley (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation) - new show!
Created by Penelope Koshkin in an effort to create more notable female cartoon stars. The titular robot, Robo-Riley- er, just Riley (an acronym for Robotic Intelligent Lifeform Emulating Youth) is created as the daughter for the brilliant Dr. Denshi and his family. Disguising herself as a human outside the Denshi home, the super-powered yet naive Riley must learn to navigate the human world, with her sardonic but wise human brother Jack by her side. But they also have to keep her true nature a secret, which won't be easy, especially with nosy newshounds and fellow students, brother-and-sister duo Scoop (outspoken sister) and Snap (silent photographer brother), who look to expose Riley's robotic true identity. Oh, who am I kidding? Of course it'll be easy- these two are the "Wile E. Coyote" and "Elmer Fudd" of the show.

In an attempt to curb allegations of racism levied against WB after the Cosby controversy, Riley's holographic human disguise and the rest of her human family are all Japanese, inspired by Japan's growing dominance in the field of technology (with "Denshi" even being the Japanese word for "electronic"). Even better, they're played almost completely non-stereotypically, with the closest things to problematic elements being their yellow-ish skin and them all having dot eyes (even Riley's human form, though her glasses kind of disguise this) while all other human characters have more traditional full eyes.

Dracula-cartoon-1024x600.jpg.webp

I haven't gotten any drawings for the characters, so let's just say that this is Dracula.
10:00 AM - Monster Mash-Up (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions, Krofft Entertainment)
Final season- the show was growing stale at this point.

1f2044d09f9b49984bdc8ccb6efe96fa.jpg

10:30 AM - Manta and Moray (Paramount Television, Filmation)
IOTL, DC Comics successfully sued Filmation over this show, claiming it to infringe on the trademark of Aquaman, citing the original plans for it to actually BE an Aquaman show before plans between DC and Filmation fell through. In this timeline, however, a mix of the differences in plot (both the ones added ITTL and the ones from IOTL), the bringing up of Marvel's Namor the Sub-Mariner coming BEFORE Aquaman, and the assumption that kids were smart enough to actually tell the difference. (I mean, come ON! Does THAT look like Aquaman to you?) Plus, ITTL, Manta and Moray was never meant to be a DC tie-in show, as DC was kinda joined at the hip with the Warner Cartoon Group, giving Manta and Moray another advantage- though it should be noted it WAS meant to be a more traditional superhero-ish show like IOTL before Paramount bought Filmation and Ralph Bakshi took the reins.

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11:00 AM - Justice League (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation)
No changes.

12:00 PM - Thunderbirds (ITC Entertainment, Henson Associates) - new show??? but one that had been running for a year at this point before new episodes
After last year's successful addition of Thunderbirds reruns to the Saturday morning schedule AND Jim Henson's successful revival of fellow Supermarionation series Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons for primetime, ITC and NBC put two and two together and greenlit a revival of Thunderbirds, with Jim Henson once again taking the lead, and series creator Gerry Anderson once again taking an advisory role.

Even though they lost Godzilla to the primetime lineup and were about to lose the aging Monster Mash-Up, the combination of new Thunderbirds episodes, rising stars Manta and Moray, and newcomer Robo-Riley proved just the shot in the arm NBC needed to get back on track- and the continued success of Justice League didn't hurt, either!​
This year, I'd probably watch only half of The Wonderful World of Mickey Mouse, as even I'd prefer the studio's earlier films over what became of The Fox and the Hound.

Aside from that debacle, I'd also stick around for Robo-Riley, Manta and Moray, and Thunderbirds. But truthfully, this is a grand lineup in its entirety.
 
This year, I'd probably watch only half of The Wonderful World of Mickey Mouse, as even I'd prefer the studio's earlier films over what became of The Fox and the Hound.

Aside from that debacle, I'd also stick around for Robo-Riley, Manta and Moray, and Thunderbirds. But truthfully, this is a grand lineup in its entirety.
For now, I’d watch the same plus Woody Woodpecker and Justice League, but we still have two more channels to look at.
 
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8:00 AM - The Wonderful World of Mickey Mouse (Walt Disney Productions)
Expanded to an hour.

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9:00 AM - The Woody Woodpecker Show (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions) - reruns
No changes.

View attachment 913786 View attachment 913787
Mind the designs here, I made these back in 2020, so they're more rough designs than anything.
9:30 AM - Robo-Riley (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation) - new show!
Created by Penelope Koshkin in an effort to create more notable female cartoon stars. The titular robot, Robo-Riley- er, just Riley (an acronym for Robotic Intelligent Lifeform Emulating Youth) is created as the daughter for the brilliant Dr. Denshi and his family. Disguising herself as a human outside the Denshi home, the super-powered yet naive Riley must learn to navigate the human world, with her sardonic but wise human brother Jack by her side. But they also have to keep her true nature a secret, which won't be easy, especially with nosy newshounds and fellow students, brother-and-sister duo Scoop (outspoken sister) and Snap (silent photographer brother), who look to expose Riley's robotic true identity. Oh, who am I kidding? Of course it'll be easy- these two are the "Wile E. Coyote" and "Elmer Fudd" of the show.

In an attempt to curb allegations of racism levied against WB after the Cosby controversy, Riley's holographic human disguise and the rest of her human family are all Japanese, inspired by Japan's growing dominance in the field of technology (with "Denshi" even being the Japanese word for "electronic"). Even better, they're played almost completely non-stereotypically, with the closest things to problematic elements being their yellow-ish skin and them all having dot eyes (even Riley's human form, though her glasses kind of disguise this) while all other human characters have more traditional full eyes.

Dracula-cartoon-1024x600.jpg.webp

I haven't gotten any drawings for the characters, so let's just say that this is Dracula.
10:00 AM - Monster Mash-Up (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions, Krofft Entertainment)
Final season- the show was growing stale at this point.

1f2044d09f9b49984bdc8ccb6efe96fa.jpg

10:30 AM - Manta and Moray (Paramount Television, Filmation)
IOTL, DC Comics successfully sued Filmation over this show, claiming it to infringe on the trademark of Aquaman, citing the original plans for it to actually BE an Aquaman show before plans between DC and Filmation fell through. In this timeline, however, a mix of the differences in plot (both the ones added ITTL and the ones from IOTL), the bringing up of Marvel's Namor the Sub-Mariner coming BEFORE Aquaman, and the assumption that kids were smart enough to actually tell the difference. (I mean, come ON! Does THAT look like Aquaman to you?) Plus, ITTL, Manta and Moray was never meant to be a DC tie-in show, as DC was kinda joined at the hip with the Warner Cartoon Group, giving Manta and Moray another advantage- though it should be noted it WAS meant to be a more traditional superhero-ish show like IOTL before Paramount bought Filmation and Ralph Bakshi took the reins.

sddefault.jpg

11:00 AM - Justice League (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation)
No changes.

12:00 PM - Thunderbirds (ITC Entertainment, Henson Associates) - new show??? but one that had been running for a year at this point before new episodes
After last year's successful addition of Thunderbirds reruns to the Saturday morning schedule AND Jim Henson's successful revival of fellow Supermarionation series Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons for primetime, ITC and NBC put two and two together and greenlit a revival of Thunderbirds, with Jim Henson once again taking the lead, and series creator Gerry Anderson once again taking an advisory role.

Even though they lost Godzilla to the primetime lineup and were about to lose the aging Monster Mash-Up, the combination of new Thunderbirds episodes, rising stars Manta and Moray, and newcomer Robo-Riley proved just the shot in the arm NBC needed to get back on track- and the continued success of Justice League didn't hurt, either!​
Good schedule. Hopefully Robo-Riley becomes a successful property.
 
Fixed. Good eye!
No problem.

View attachment 913786 View attachment 913787
Mind the designs here, I made these back in 2020, so they're more rough designs than anything.
I actually like them a lot! Especially the way where she has two different forms. Kinda like the flip-side of that one MLAATR episode.
9:30 AM - Robo-Riley (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation) - new show!
Created by Penelope Koshkin in an effort to create more notable female cartoon stars. The titular robot, Robo-Riley- er, just Riley (an acronym for Robotic Intelligent Lifeform Emulating Youth) is created as the daughter for the brilliant Dr. Denshi and his family. Disguising herself as a human outside the Denshi home, the super-powered yet naive Riley must learn to navigate the human world, with her sardonic but wise human brother Jack by her side. But they also have to keep her true nature a secret, which won't be easy, especially with nosy newshounds and fellow students, brother-and-sister duo Scoop (outspoken sister) and Snap (silent photographer brother), who look to expose Riley's robotic true identity. Oh, who am I kidding? Of course it'll be easy- these two are the "Wile E. Coyote" and "Elmer Fudd" of the show.​
Sounds fun to watch!

In an attempt to curb allegations of racism levied against WB after the Cosby controversy, Riley's holographic human disguise and the rest of her human family are all Japanese, inspired by Japan's growing dominance in the field of technology (with "Denshi" even being the Japanese word for "electronic"). Even better, they're played almost completely non-stereotypically, with the closest things to problematic elements being their yellow-ish skin and them all having dot eyes (even Riley's human form, though her glasses kind of disguise this) while all other human characters have more traditional full eyes.​
Good on Koshkin and WB.

Though to be honest, dot eyes for Asian characters aren’t as stereotypical as sideways oval eyes.
 
I actually like them a lot! Especially the way where she has two different forms. Kinda like the flip-side of that one MLAATR episode.
Teenage Robot, for me, was an inspiration, alongside Invader Zim.
Though to be honest, dot eyes for Asian characters aren’t as stereotypical as sideways oval eyes.
Yeah, though there is still the "small eyes" bit. Still, that and the yellow-ish skin (which does humorously mirror Riley's golden plating) are the only stereotypes present. They don't even have the cringeworthy Asian accents! Although most of them are still voiced by white people...
 
Teenage Robot, for me, was an inspiration, alongside Invader Zim.
I could tell.
Yeah, though there is still the "small eyes" bit. Still, that and the yellow-ish skin (which does humorously mirror Riley's golden plating) are the only stereotypes present. They don't even have the cringeworthy Asian accents! Although most of them are still voiced by white people...
But still, WBA has come a long way from the days of Jungle Jitters, Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs, Bugs Bunny Nips the Nips and Tokio Jokio.

What does the voice cast consist of BTW?
 
More about this TL's Nick equivalent Kaleidoscope - imported UK programs like Count Duckula & Danger Mouse were mentioned.

What about Nick's other programming in the 1980s and early 1990s? The Canadian sketch comedy You Can't Do That on Television; the game shows Finders Keepers and Double Dare; and anime series like the Mysterious Cities of Gold, Maple Town, etc. - do we still get those ITTL?
 
1979 TV - CBS Saturday Morning
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8:00 AM - The Film Fair (Walt Disney Productions, FilmFair)
No changes.

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8:30 AM - The New Adventures of Mighty Mouse and Friends (20th Century-Fox Television, Nelvana Enterprises, Viacom Enterprises) - new show!
A package show made up of Terrytoons, primarily the more modern ones made by Fox and Nelvana for theaters, though at least one per show was a “classic” Terrytoon. Also, despite visual and temporal similarities to the Filmation show, laxer restrictions and these shorts being made for a general theatrical audience means they’re closer in content to the Ralph Bakshi version.

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9:00 AM - The Silly Sylvia Show (Columbia Pictures Television, Rankin/Bass Productions)
No changes.

1719414950844.jpeg

9:30 AM - Peanuts (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation, Mendelson/Melendez Productions)
This is when Peppermint Patty takes over the third segment. Franklin also gets a more major role, to combat the racism allegations Cosby levied against WB following his firing. Other than that, no changes.

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10:00 AM: The Avengers (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions, Marvel Comics)
No changes.

11:00 AM - Star-Tunes (Warner Bros. Television, Tex Avery Productions, Jay Ward Productions)
This season removes the disco scenes, the show they were meaning to mock having been cancelled. This is also the final season, though the “Looney Tunes space hero” niche would be filled sooner rather than later, with a show that ultimately caused the ending and would be its replacement…

11:30 AM - The New Adventures of Speed Racer (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation, Tatsunoko Productions) - new show!
A reboot of the original Speed Racer and an American-Japanese coproduction, a cross between M-Thunder (IOTL a rejected 1984 pitch for a reboot of Speed Racer) and the IOTL WB Speed Racer pitch that resulted in The Dukes of Hazzard. Also made as a response to NBC’s Godzilla, which had ironically moved to primetime. Damn.

12:00 PM: Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle (Warner Bros. Television, DePatie-Freleng Enterprises)
This is the final season.

12:30 PM: 30 Minutes
No changes.

1:00 PM: The CBS Childrens' Film Festival
No changes.

~~~

Doing formatting like this on an iPad is a bitch. Can’t even change the image sizes, and the page keeps wanting to scroll up whenever I move the cursor somewhere else.​
 
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View attachment 914456 View attachment 914461 View attachment 914462
8:00 AM - The Film Fair (Walt Disney Productions, FilmFair)
No changes.

View attachment 914457
8:30 AM - The New Adventures of Mighty Mouse and Friends (20th Century-Fox Television, Nelvana Enterprises, Viacom Enterprises) - new show!
A package show made up of Terrytoons, primarily the more modern ones made by Fox and Nelvana for theaters, though at least one per show was a “classic” Terrytoon. Also, despite visual and temporal similarities to the Filmation show, laxer restrictions and these shorts being made for a general theatrical audience means they’re closer in content to the Ralph Bakshi version.

View attachment 914458
9:00 AM - The Silly Sylvia Show (Columbia Pictures Television, Rankin/Bass Productions)
No changes.

View attachment 914459
9:30 AM - Peanuts (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation, Mendelson/Melendez Productions)
This is when Peppermint Patty takes over the third segment. Franklin also gets a more major role, to combat the racism allegations Cosby levied against WB following his firing. Other than that, no changes.

View attachment 914460 View attachment 914463 View attachment 914464
10:00 AM: The Avengers (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions, Marvel Comics)
No changes.

11:00 AM - Star-Tunes (Warner Bros. Television, Tex Avery Productions, Jay Ward Productions)
This season removes the disco scenes, the show they were meaning to mock having been cancelled. This is also the final season, though the “Looney Tunes space hero” niche would be filled sooner rather than later, with a show that ultimately caused the ending and would be its replacement…

11:30 AM - The New Adventures of Speed Racer (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation, Tatsunoko Productions) - new show!
A reboot of the original Speed Racer and an American-Japanese coproduction, a cross between M-Thunder (IOTL a rejected 1984 pitch for a reboot of Speed Racer) and the IOTL WB Speed Racer pitch that resulted in The Dukes of Hazzard. Also made as a response to NBC’s Godzilla, which had ironically moved to primetime. Damn.

12:00 PM: Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle (Warner Bros. Television, DePatie-Freleng Enterprises)
This is the final season.

12:30 PM: 30 Minutes
No changes.

1:00 PM: The CBS Childrens' Film Festival
No changes.

~~~

Doing formatting like this on an iPad is a bitch. Can’t even change the image sizes, and the page keeps wanting to scroll up whenever I move the cursor somewhere else.​
Okay, after looking at both NBC and CBS, I'd watch these shows:

8:00 A.M. - The Wonderful World of Mickey Mouse (first half)
8:30 A.M. - Mighty Mouse and Friends
9:00 A.M. - Woody Woodpecker
9:30 A.M. - Peanuts
10:00 A.M. - The Avengers (whole thing)
11:00 A.M. - Justice League (same with The Avengers)
12:00 P.M. - The Thunderbirds
1:00 P.M. - The CBS Childrens' Film Festival

Now let's pray that ABC improved from last year. Maybe they have some Nick-, uh, I mean Kaleidoscope shows in the mix?
 
View attachment 914456 View attachment 914461 View attachment 914462
8:00 AM - The Film Fair (Walt Disney Productions, FilmFair)
No changes.

View attachment 914457
8:30 AM - The New Adventures of Mighty Mouse and Friends (20th Century-Fox Television, Nelvana Enterprises, Viacom Enterprises) - new show!
A package show made up of Terrytoons, primarily the more modern ones made by Fox and Nelvana for theaters, though at least one per show was a “classic” Terrytoon. Also, despite visual and temporal similarities to the Filmation show, laxer restrictions and these shorts being made for a general theatrical audience means they’re closer in content to the Ralph Bakshi version.

View attachment 914458
9:00 AM - The Silly Sylvia Show (Columbia Pictures Television, Rankin/Bass Productions)
No changes.

View attachment 914459
9:30 AM - Peanuts (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation, Mendelson/Melendez Productions)
This is when Peppermint Patty takes over the third segment. Franklin also gets a more major role, to combat the racism allegations Cosby levied against WB following his firing. Other than that, no changes.

View attachment 914460 View attachment 914463 View attachment 914464
10:00 AM: The Avengers (Universal Television, Walter Lantz Productions, Marvel Comics)
No changes.

11:00 AM - Star-Tunes (Warner Bros. Television, Tex Avery Productions, Jay Ward Productions)
This season removes the disco scenes, the show they were meaning to mock having been cancelled. This is also the final season, though the “Looney Tunes space hero” niche would be filled sooner rather than later, with a show that ultimately caused the ending and would be its replacement…

11:30 AM - The New Adventures of Speed Racer (Warner Bros. Television, Warner Bros. Animation, Tatsunoko Productions) - new show!
A reboot of the original Speed Racer and an American-Japanese coproduction, a cross between M-Thunder (IOTL a rejected 1984 pitch for a reboot of Speed Racer) and the IOTL WB Speed Racer pitch that resulted in The Dukes of Hazzard. Also made as a response to NBC’s Godzilla, which had ironically moved to primetime. Damn.

12:00 PM: Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle (Warner Bros. Television, DePatie-Freleng Enterprises)
This is the final season.

12:30 PM: 30 Minutes
No changes.

1:00 PM: The CBS Childrens' Film Festival
No changes.

~~~

Doing formatting like this on an iPad is a bitch. Can’t even change the image sizes, and the page keeps wanting to scroll up whenever I move the cursor somewhere else.​
You forgot to put “CBS Saturday Morning” in the threadmark title.
 
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