Medieval America Mark III

It'll be a long, LONG time before the world returns to the Industrial age.

Besides that Asia is probably a bit different than it was in the original medieval period. With a Presbyterian Korea, Catholic Philippines and whatever is going on in Australia leading to a far greater Abrahamic presence in that part of the world. Alongside the traditional centers of the Islamic faith in the region.

Same could probably be said about Africa being divided between a Christian South and Muslim North...
 
It'll be a long, LONG time before the world returns to the Industrial age.

Besides that Asia is probably a bit different than it was in the original medieval period. With a Presbyterian Korea, Catholic Philippines and whatever is going on in Australia leading to a far greater Abrahamic presence in that part of the world. Alongside the traditional centers of the Islamic faith in the region.

Same could probably be said about Africa being divided between a Christian South and Muslim North...
Christians in East Asia probably grow to resemble other east-asian religions. Its not that unprecedented as Muslims have been in East Asia for hundreds of years now.

I've speculated on this before, Australia is basically the end of the Asian trade routes, same way Mozambique was the end of the East-African Trade routes, though nowadays the Western Cape is the end of the East African trade routes with stops in Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban, Maputo.

Post


Red being offshore navigation, pink being coast hugging. The black and yellow diamonds being potential stops (glorified trade posts) except for the southernmost one which is Brisbane

Starting off in Timor, you have a 500 km deep sea journey across the Timor Sea, Then about 1000km around the Gulf of Carpentia, another 1000km over the Cape York Peninsula (which was and continues to be mostly wilderness), then another 1500 km through the Great Barrier Reef to make it to Brisbane. Further sailing to Sydney is another 800 km, Melbourne is another 1000km on top of that (1800km total), Adelaide is another 900km on top of that (2700km total).

Assuming an average speed of about 75 km/day thats 4000km from Timor to Brisbane, 53 days of sailing with another 36 days to Adelaide.

Perth is even worse. Its 2700km from Adelaide (another 36 days), 3300 km from Timor (44 days). Both routes are wilderness though the route from Adelaide is only 1500 km without resupply (20 days).

So basically, noone is travelling to Australia from South East Asia without a damn good reason given that it's 2 months (one way) from Timor which is itself a month from Jakarta.

Its the equivalent of sailing around the continental USA.

 
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As an addendum, trade with Australia operates more like the route from the Pacific Northwest to Asia. Timor to Cairns is much more doable and then other traders span the Cairns to Brisbane leg.

And if Polynesians retain their navigational abilities, they might trade across the Pacific. It might be technically possible for extremely limited trade between New Zealand and the rest of the world. As long as people know that landmasses exist, the trade between might be possible.

If we wanted to stretch it, Polynesians could be found around the world, valued for their navigational abilities. Since people know that there are continents on the other side of the ocean, they would be more inclined to venture out into the open sea.
 
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A timeline/historiographical note:

Jimmy Duval is said to have risen to have become the Colonel of the Red River Territory sometime in the 2500s-2530s. However, the Red River Territory (AKA Texarkana) is said to have been formed somewhere within the range of ~2750-2870 (big range due to uncertainties in the timeline - either 150-130 years before 2900 or 150-130 years before 3000). So it could not have been the Red River Territory as we understand it - rather, it must have been some sort of Cajunland kingdom that emerged following the fall of the Tchaktaw (~2300-2350) and existed at the longest up to the conquests of the Andersons (2700-2750, though again this is uncertain - my original post suggested that the Andersons may have conquered Texas ~2800).
 
I think we need more poetic names. "The State of Texarkana" sounds better than the rather clinical "Red River Territory". And the unlabelled smaller states are free game, naturally.
 
I think we need more poetic names. "The State of Texarkana" sounds better than the rather clinical "Red River Territory". And the unlabelled smaller states are free game, naturally.
Legally, it would still have to be referred to as "The Texarkana Territory" in that case, though I think a good compromise is that both names are in common circulation, just as one may refer to "Prussia" and "The Teutonic Order" interchangeably after the Northern Crusade.
 
Legally, it would still have to be referred to as "The Texarkana Territory" in that case, though I think a good compromise is that both names are in common circulation, just as one may refer to "Prussia" and "The Teutonic Order" interchangeably after the Northern Crusade.
Fair enough. "Texarkana" is what the region's name as a nation will be.

Also, I'm thinking that we should discuss some of the nameless states on the map. For instance, the strip between Ohio and North Carolina could be named either "Appalachia" or "Franklin".

And that at the present the leader of the slowly-unifying New England could be progressing in the process of carefully stripping the various counties and states of independent New England of their autonomy.
 
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I'm all for finding more names, albeit if they existed already in the area AND are unique, the better. IE, I'll take Franklin/Frankland over Appalachia since "Appalachia" is a regional term and mountain range already.
 
Jimmy Duval is said to have risen to have become the Colonel of the Red River Territory sometime in the 2500s-2530s. However, the Red River Territory (AKA Texarkana) is said to have been formed somewhere within the range of ~2750-2870 (big range due to uncertainties in the timeline - either 150-130 years before 2900 or 150-130 years before 3000). So it could not have been the Red River Territory as we understand it - rather, it must have been some sort of Cajunland kingdom that emerged following the fall of the Tchaktaw (~2300-2350) and existed at the longest up to the conquests of the Andersons (2700-2750, though again this is uncertain - my original post suggested that the Andersons may have conquered Texas ~2800).
[/QUOTE]

Perhaps the Red River Territory of Duval was re-established in the 2700s-2800s after having been destroyed by Cowboys in the 2600s.
 
I'm all for finding more names, albeit if they existed already in the area AND are unique, the better. IE, I'll take Franklin/Frankland over Appalachia since "Appalachia" is a regional term and mountain range already.
I'm all for "Franklin" being transformed into "Frankland" as memories of the name fade away. Especially if we can call the people living there "Franks"/"Frankish"/"Franklanders". And that the current leader is named Charles.
 
The Veiled Prophet



The Veiled Prophet Society is one of the most important organizations in St. Louis, and one of the stranger of the chivalrous order of Medieval America - and that's saying something. The Society's history stretches back to an era further than most Americans care to remember in any detail beyond the pastiche provided by the Church. Indeed, the Society claims a pedigree that begins far beyond and before America.

The Veiled Prophet Society and the figure of the Veiled Prophet receded following the Regression, as most frivolous traditions did. However, the imagery of the Veiled Prophet began to re-surface in the 26th century as Cowboy raids increasingly threatened the western fringe of the State. Stories abounded of a veiled lancer that defended the state from the depredations of the Infidel Hordes, an extension of the ancient "masked hero" genre that permeated pre and post-Regression literature.

In the second half of the 28th century, the frequency and fervor with which these tales were told intensified on account of two factors: firstly, the increasingly far-ranging and destructive raids of the Cowboys put fear into the heart of the Missouriman and demanding a hero to right. Secondly, the rise of the white knights of the Klan and their conquest of the Red River Territory inspired a fervor throughout the region, proving that the Cowboys may, indeed, be defeated - and by veiled lancers ahorse, no less.

However, stories would do little to stay the furies of the West. In 2270, the Bailey Family toppled the walls and burned the city to the ground in one of the most brutal sacks in recent memory, and the Veiled Prophet did nothing to stop them. This didn't stop the Missourian refugees from trying to claim otherwise - one particularly popular story was that the Veiled Prophet alone held back 10,000 Cowboys when the wall was first breached, giving countless time to escape the city.

In fact, the Veiled Prophet became associated with the millennial fervor that was sweeping the East - with America's Millennial fast approaching, many predicted that the End Times would begin in earnest, and that America would begin the process of restoring the Empire of Liberty to make way for the Millennial Kingdom. It was predicted that the Veiled Prophet would emerge from occultation and lead the re-conquest of St. Louis and, after revealing his true form (what that was varied from teller to teller), would lead a more general reconquest of the whole nation.

Of course, 2776 came and went. While plenty notable happened in this year (spawned by millennial fervor), none of the apocalyptic predictions came to pass, and the Ride of the Veiled Prophet was no exception. However, it seems that the tales did have a major impact on the psyches of the Missourian court-in-exile, who sought to make the legends reality.

Inspired and aided by the Noble Brothers of the Ark, the Missourians founded (or rather, re-founded) the Society of the Veiled Prophet. The group inaugurated their own Veiled Prophet in secret, though rumor has it that the first was Lafayette Schwartz himself. Possibly, no Prophet was instated at all and the position was left empty, or the costume was only worn by a placeholder for the purpose of ceremonies. whatever the case, the rest of the men arranged themselves into the public-face of the organization, the so-called "Bengal Lancers." The Society were among the groups that joined Lafayette Schwartz in his war to restore order to the wild lands of Missouri.

The group exists through to the current day. Whether or not it continues to be lead by the house of Schwartz is unknown, though considered by many to be unlikely, as the Schwartz's have fallen heavily under the sway of the merchant families of Memphis. Today, the primary goal of the organization is to restore the power of the landed nobility, wresting away control from the merchant clans and the civilized tribes that have risen to prominence throughout the state.

Belief surrounding the Veiled Prophet is highly varied and not in the slightest condoned by the Church. The identity of the Prophet is the most discussed aspect, with guesses ranging from George Washington to Jesus Christ himself, or perhaps the Veil is indeed empty and is inhabited by the Holy Ghost. The most popular (and least sacrilegious) belief is that the Prophet is a manifestation of the Unknown Soldier. After the sack of Washington, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was found to be empty, leading to stories across the nation of the Unknown Soldier appearing in battles and turning the tide in favor of one side or another. The Cult of the Unknown Soldier is somewhat tolerated by the Church, and there has been serious talk of making the Unknown Soldier a Patriot-Saint. In the case of the Veiled Prophet, it is believed that the Unknown Soldier still leads the Society in secret, and that he will one day emerge and reveal himself to the world.

The Bengal Lancers are some of the finest in Missouri, and continue to do battle with the Cowboy Hordes. The figure of the Veiled Prophet has become something of a boogeyman for the horsemen of the plains, who see him as a demon worshiped by the sinful Eastrons.
 
[Semi-Canon] St. Louis Timeline

2500s: Cowboy hordes begin to pose a major problem for settled peoples.

2720s: Arkansas is conquered by the Winfield Cowboys, a particuarly lenient clan.

2750s: The Sons of the South launch their crusade for Texarkana, seeking to dethrone the Anderson-allied Plauchet Cajuns

2770s: In 2270, the Baileys sack St. Louis, burning the city to the ground.

The Winfields of Arkansas launch a raid that reaches as far as the walls of Memphis before retreating back into their territory. Spurred on by the success of the Red River Crusade, the crusade for Arkansas is launched by the Brothers of Little Rock. The Crusade ends very quickly and decisively in favor of the Crusaders.

2790s: After 20 years of anarchy in Missouri, Lafayette Schwarz receives George Bailey's blessing to restore order.

2800s: Banished by the President of Ohio, the Noble Brothers of the Ark move their operations into Missouri and Arkansas, to assist in the conquest of that state and to defend against the Okies, respectively.

2820s: After 25 years of fighting to restore order, Schwartz and George Bailey allows Memphisite merchants to begin the rebuilding of St. Louis.

2830s: 7 years after the rebuilding began, the Mormon Apostles of Nauvoo are allowed to set up a Mormon Quarter in St. Louis by Governor Schwartz. Presumably not long after, Governor Schwartz passes away at the ripe old age of 72, having ruled Missouri for nearly 40 years.
 
It'd be a lot easier to think up names for the little guys in the east if I knew where they are exactly.
  1. How about having the state between Allegheny and Pennsylvania be controlled by the Pennsylvania Dutch?
  2. I'm thinking that the small state southwest of the Knoxville one should be named Chattanooga.
 
It'd be a lot easier to think up names for the little guys in the east if I knew where they are exactly.
  1. How about having the state between Allegheny and Pennsylvania be controlled by the Pennsylvania Dutch?
  2. I'm thinking that the small state southwest of the Knoxville one should be named Chattanooga.
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1. We're talking about 1 right? It already is, it's Northumberland County
 
So I calculated the possible future arrivals of Halley's Comet (it seems that it arrivals every 70-80 years) and my calculations have the arrivals being in 2820s and 2900s. Perhaps Halley's Comet can be something else?
 
So I calculated the possible future arrivals of Halley's Comet (it seems that it arrivals every 70-80 years) and my calculations have the arrivals being in 2820s and 2900s. Perhaps Halley's Comet can be something else?
Well, it could be something else, but I found a source to the contrary;


Interestingly, this model also predicts an apparition in the year 3000. That should make for some millennial fun.
 
Well, it could be something else, but I found a source to the contrary;


Interestingly, this model also predicts an apparition in the year 3000. That should make for some millennial fun.
NonDenom Millenarian Heretics: The Founding Fathers shall return to purge the world of the cowboy, the voodoo and the Quebecois

Cowboys: Jesus shall return, the great stone men will rise out of the ground and the whole world shall be fertile pasture
 
Well, it could be something else, but I found a source to the contrary;


Interestingly, this model also predicts an apparition in the year 3000. That should make for some millennial fun.
I'm more likely to trust actual professionals in that case. All I did was recognize that Halley Comet tends to re-appear every 70s years or so. Not the most scientific method I must say. In regards to Halley's Comet in 3000, that would be some good fun indeed.

Your Dates vs My Dates (The differences start becoming major the further in the future we get)
2209/2210
2284/2287
2358/2362
2430/2440
2504/2515
2579/2593
2653/2670
2726/2749
2795/2826
2863/2905
2931/2982
3000/3058
 
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