Medieval America Mark III

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Flashman, Jun 21, 2017.

  1. Flashman A Real Go-Getter

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    The United Fruit Company, Arkham Office
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    Here's the completed worlda.
     
  2. Flashman A Real Go-Getter

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    The United Fruit Company, Arkham Office
    Updated OP.
     
  3. tehskyman Engineer for the money

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    Jul 8, 2013
    Pope-Gallatin County
    [​IMG]

    Where the Mississippi and Ohio rivers meet lie a mess of small autonomous states. Sheltered by the rivers, they remain largely independent from the giants which surround them, the Commonwealth of Mississippi and the Commonwealth of Ohio. This area is a transition area between the Midwestern cultures to the north and Dixie to the south. As you float down the Mississippi from Pope-Gallatin County to Shelby County, the inhabitants transition from largely midwestern in P-G County to far more Dixie in Shelby County.

    Pope-Gallatin County

    PGCountyFlagSmall.png


    System of Government: Feudal Tributary State (Sovereign under the Commonwealth of Ohio)
    Head of State:
    Sheriff, selected from sons and nephews of ruling Sheriff prior to his death
    Population: 800,000
    Religion: American Non-Denominational Church
    Totemic Symbol: Saluki Dog

    Historically, Pope-Gallatin county was primarily a tributary state of the State of Illinois because of it's origins within the State of Illinois. However because of it's proximity to Ohio it also paid tribute and fealty to the Commonwealth of Ohio as well. Balancing the desires of the two states was the greatest challenge for the Sheriff of P-G County as to prevent an aggrieved party from invading and removing any independence it may have had. This exact situation happened once where the Sheriff of then Pope County offended an emissary of the State of Illinois that then governor Peter II led an army to replace the Sheriff of Pope County. The new Sheriff was an elderly man who had only one surviving daughter. To secure her inheritance he betrothed her to the son of his neighbor to the north, the Sheriff of Gallatin County. With that move, their son would hold both titles of Pope and Gallatin County. His grandson would merge the two titles together in order to assert his rights over Evansville and increase his personal power. However since then the Sheriff's power over the merchants of the river has eroded.

    Pope-Gallatin County is largely a feudal state but the merchants have immense control of the towns and cities along and south of the Ohio river. It is they who control the ferries across and with this level of influence have carved out free cities for themselves, largely free of influence from the Sheriff though they do pay taxes to the Sheriff for his protection. This is not the situation in Ohio because there it is the president who controls the ferry guilds and he is also not afraid to go to war with some of the more powerful pure merchant states. But in the free areas of Pope-Gallatin County merchants own vast tracts of land where indentured laborers farm the lands for tobacco, cannabis and other cash crops.

    During the industrial era, this region of southern Illinois was known as Little Egypt presumably because of the town known as Cairo, at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. That town has long been lost to spring floods but has been rebuilt on higher ground to the south east. The new Cairo is a small yet bustling city of 20,000, servicing traders as they go on their way. P-G county is also home to Evansville, a city of approximately 35,000. During the years of Dabney raids, Evansville remained unscathed because of it's location east of the Wabash and consequently the Wabash Wall. Because of the destruction of St Louis, Evansville grew as a result, taking in many of the merchant houses which had to flee from the cowboy hordes. That drew alot of trade to Evansville and it grew a lot during that time. However, since the reconstruction of St Louis, many of those merchants and the trade they brought with them have left, leaving the city to decline from a peak of 50,000 to it's current population. However, Evansville's population has remained stable for about 2 decades around 35,000 indicating that the decline has largely stopped. Another important city within the borders of Pope-Gallatin county is Paducah, located just downstream from where the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers merge into the Ohio. It has a population of about 15,000.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
  4. Flashman A Real Go-Getter

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    Opium ought not to be grown in the east I think
     
  5. tehskyman Engineer for the money

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    Changed
     
  6. 245 Well-Known Member

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    what's happening in the middle of the west and east and the Canadian prairies?
     
  7. Flashman A Real Go-Getter

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    Scratch that - maybe it can only be grown by the Church and Federal Agencies, to keep it from being used as a narcotic.

    The middle of the west is largelyy tribal hunter-gatherers, shepherds and camel-jockeys that fall under the sphere of influence of one power or another. Groups include the Nevadans. the Beelem, the tribes of the Jeffsin Marches, and the Hilljacks (Mormons outside of Salt Lake's direct control).

    By the middle of the east, I suppose you mean the Great Plains. If so, it's dominated by Cowboy clans, who are essentially steppe nomads. Major groups include the Rizzinis (between Deseret and Iowa, the larget Cowboy horde), the Rosebud, the Sioux, the Danvurs, the Pecos Cowboys, the Broncos, the Andersons, the Okies, the Kanadi, and the Hillians.
     
  8. tehskyman Engineer for the money

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    [​IMG]

    Dyer County

    System of Government: Feudal State
    Head of State: Sheriff, selected from sons and nephews of ruling Sheriff prior to his death
    Population: 370,000
    Religion: American Non-Denominational Church
    Totemic Symbol: Apple Blossom


    Despite its location along the Mississippi, Dyer County remains relatively isolated. The circumstances of the meander of the river has ensured that kilometers of swamp and forest lie in between the river and the highlands. The bottomlands are poorly populated and incredibly swampy and difficult to traverse. And the Sheriffs of Dyer County like to keep it that way. The swamps and forests ensure that merchants lack the opportunity to build a city within their county and thus a foot hold from which their influence can spread. This policy originates from the early half of the new Medieval era.

    The flow of the river was different then and it's path took it near Dyersburg. By the time of Sheriff Dale II in 2456 , Dyersburg had grown into a great city of nearly 40,000. The merchant guilds had carved out vast tracts of land for themselves. Special Business Districts they were called. Most of the land was a part of these Special Business Districts. On these lands the merchant guilds grew vast fields of tobacco and cotton. And they paid no tax, had no levy, were totally free to do whatever they pleased. In essence, they were independent. Like his father and great-grandfather before him, Dale had little influence over the merchants, but unlike his predecessors he was not dependent on them either. The merchant guilds had gotten his ancestors addicted to their foul cocaine but Dale was free of its hold. However, when a popular revolt against the landowners began, Dale seized on the opportunity. He assembled men, many of whom were disposed Ohioan lancers and helped the serfs revolt against the merchants, promising them their own land in return. By the end of the year, Dale and his army had retaken the vast majority of land held under Special Business Districts. Dale however reneged upon some of his promises, handing out seized land to his strongest supporters, though many serfs did end up as free farmers.

    Since that time, a handful of mercenary armies have been assembled to try and retake Dyer County but those attempts have been stopped by the lancers of Dyer County. Using Midwestern armor and tactics, the lancers have been able to beat back the southern mercenaries. These resources have been provided by the President of Ohio, knowing that a thorn in the sides of Shelby County keeps them from trying to exert influence in Ohio. Recently, under direction from Cincinnati, Dyer County and some Kentucky lancers raided P-G County and the State of Tennessee. The raiders forced the two countries to pledge allegiance to the President in Cincinnati to prevent similar raids from occurring again.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2018
  9. Flashman A Real Go-Getter

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    No flag?
     
  10. Imperial Inkstand-filler Well-Known Member

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    @Flashman , on your most recent map, what is the nation between the Dinetah and Deseret?
     
  11. Flashman A Real Go-Getter

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    A vague splotch representing the states of Kuluradu
     
  12. tehskyman Engineer for the money

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    State of Alabama

    alabamaFlag.png

    System of Government: Feudal State
    Head of State: Governor, selected from sons and nephews of ruling Governor, prior to his death
    Population: 425,000
    Religion: American Non-Denominational Church
    Totemic Symbol: Yellowhammer (Northern Flicker)

    In the early years of the new medieval Era, the Governor of Mississippi was extremely powerful. Along with his counter part in Georgia they were undoubtedly the kings of the South. The Governors of Alabama had little such luck. Hobbled by constant rebellion and invasions from all sides the state was nibbled away at until nothing remained and it was completely absorbed into the now Commonwealths of Georgia and Mississippi. For the next 300-400 years, the border between Georgia and Mississippi was an area in flux, with border lords raiding and taking over villages from each other. Occasionally these lords would stop paying their taxes and rebel, citing some obscure nonsense about taxation without representation as though they knew anything about the old American Constitution. However, as the central authority of the Mississippian governor eroded over time these rebellions would last longer and take more effort to put down.

    This came to a head when the Golden Circle took charge in Mississippi and the Governor's power really took a nosedive. Unfortunately, the Golden Circle seized power in a time when their own control over the remaining warlords of the Commonwealth was shaky. Sensing an opportunity, and locked out of the corridors of power, many landlords in what was once Alabama and Northern Mississippi schemed to wrestled power away from the Golden Circle. This new group, who called themselves the Men of the Red Cross banded together and declared themselves independent. They gathered in Birmingham and marched on Meridian to either split the Commonwealth in two or usurp power from the Golden Circle. At Meridian they managed to capture the puppet Governor Robert IV Maddox and used him as a hostage against the Golden Circle. However, what they did not count on was the Governor of Georgia getting involved. Sensing an opportunity to expand the size of his own lands to shore up his own power-base he invaded from the east. Quickly the Men of the Red Cross marched east and fought the Georgians to a stalemate at Sylacauga. Then they marched back west to the Mississippi River to protect their lands which were being ravaged by Shelby County mercenaries. It was there they met the armies of the Golden Circle.

    Battle did not immediately commence though. Knights were sent to parlay. The Alabamian delegation threatened the Mississippians by stating "If pitched battle should ensue, y'all gonna regret it. We have the governor". The Mississippians responded with "If the governor dies, we'll have the new governor and all y'all going be left with is a stinking body."

    Obviously parlay talks were at an impasse. With violence being the only answer, the Battle of Batesville would ensue. Tired from weeks of marching in the dying heat of summer and grinding down the Georgians, the Alabamian army was defeated but managed a semi-orderly withdrawal. From there they fought a fighting retreat all the way to Montgomery where storms forced an end to the fighting. The seizure of most rebel holdings ensured the integrity of Mississippi was intact and so the Golden Circle stopped and disbanded their armies, personal power secured. Further treaties between the Men of the Red Cross and the Golden Circle would have the Men of the Red Cross rescind their claims over the land they no longer held and for the return of the puppet Governor.

    However for the former rebels, this meant that they were reduced to a thin arc on the northeastern border of the Commonwealth of Mississippi. There was not nearly enough land for many lords still alive. New Governor of Alabama Adrian Henderson hosted a dinner for the remaining lords. He slaughtered all but 3 who had already pledged allegiance to him.

    In the following years, the new State of Alabama would implode. When the eldest of Henderson's vassals Tobias Bringier, died, Henderson would seize all of his lands instead of giving it to Bringier's son as was expected. This would prompt Henderson's remaining vassals John Chambers and Remus Upson to win their own independence from Henderson. Facing an army larger and more organized than his own, Henderson would allow Chambers and Upson to break off. Their nation, centered on Montgomery would tear itself in two upon the death of Chambers. Montgomery would later erupt into a peasant rebellion that made the city and it's surrounding lands independent from warlords. Montgomery's independence is now upheld by both the Commonwealth of Mississippi and Georgia. Neither nation is willing to see the valuable city fall into their rival's hands and so it remains independent.

    What remains of the State of Alabama is a strip of land along the Tennisy river. In it's weakened and diminished state it has come to be dominated by the State of Tennisy who have replaced governors they dislike multiple times. The current Governor Darius Allen was himself installed 20 years ago when as a young colonel he was prohibited from marrying the old Governor's only child. He stole her away in the night and declared for the throne in Huntsville. With support from Tennisy , Darius defeated his father-in-laws army. Caving into his wife's pleading, Darius spared his father-in-laws life, instead locking him away in a castle where he is of no harm to anyone.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2019
  13. tehskyman Engineer for the money

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    Free County of Montgomery

    mongomeryFlagSmall.png

    System of Government: City-State Republic
    Head of State: Mayor, Chosen by and from City Council
    City Council Composition: 5 members chosen by the District Supervisory, 5 members chosen by the Council of Orders, 10 members chosen by the Merchants Council, 15 members directly elected in various city districts
    Population: 220,000

    City: 70,000
    Countryside: 150,000
    Religion: American Non-Denominational Church
    Totemic Symbol: Two Halberds, Crossed

    Birthed when a feudal warlord overstepped his bounds Montgomery is a land of relative freedom in a region locked in rigidity. Aaron II Upson tried to evict several merchant corporations when he wasn't able to bed on of their daughters. In response to the provocation the merchants hired some mercenaries and armed the peasants and overthrew Upson and declared themselves a free republic. The peasants died by the thousands but they overwhelmed the lancers of Upson and were eventually able to prevail. Since then they have been fought over by Mississippi and Georgia each wanting to control the trade and District Supervisory Seat. Sandwiched between the Commonwealth of Mississippi and the Commonwealth of Georgia, Montgomery remains independent because neither nation is willing to allow the other to have it. 150 years ago, the two went to war over the city. When the war ended in a stalement with the loss of thousands of Southern aristocrats the two sides agreed that squabbling over the city was too costly. And as such, they signed the Montgomery Agreement to ensure this deal.

    The 3rd Montgomery war started when Mississippian Lancers crossed over into Montgomery County territory to try and capture a fleeing traitor. The traitor made it into Montgomery proper and took shelter in the local cathedral. The lancers entered the town and threatened to kill everyone in the cathedral if the traitor wasn't brought to them. The deadline passed and the lancers stormed into the cathedral killing several priests of the church and the prisoner. The townsfolk were outraged by the killings and hung the lancers for desecrating the holy basilica. Including in the deaths was a son of the Lieutenant Governor. Mississippi sent an army to punish the county. Hearing about the move, the Governor of Georgia sent out his own army to stop the Mississippians from taking over the city. After several battles the war ended in stalemate and as such the Montgomery Agreement was drafted and signed.

    Now then, the county has become a haven for various merchant corporations, traitors and religious fanatics. Protected by the church supervisory and their enforced independence the city has grown wild. Various merchant corporations have set up shop here, establishing various metalworks and textile mills employing thousands. Merchants here have a level of freedom that is not seen anywhere in Mississippi and Georgia. They pay relatively little taxes and don't have to be concerned about the mercantilism of feudal warlords. The city has also spawned several religious orders and monasteries, abbeys and nunneries dot the landscape. Most influential among the religious orders is the Sons of the South. Birthed here among exiled lancers turned religious fanatics, for a brief moment the Sons of the South united Southerners to expel cowboys from the Red River Basin.

    Wherever possible peasants from surrounding nations will try and make their way here. Being able to have their debts forgotten and farming the lands of the church for a pay that their feudal overseers will not even consider makes the prospect attractive. In response on the roads to Montgomery the warlords have set up checkpoints and watchtowers to prevent their debt-slaves from running away.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
  14. HonestAbe1809 Abraham Lincoln 2020

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    Dec 1, 2013
    1. Having the hammer and sickle be the totemic symbol of Birmingham would be simpler.
    2. I like the combination of Old Union imagery, Confederate Grey, and the hammer and sickle. Makes sense that it’d be a symbol of liberation and freedom stripped of pre-regression Communist baggage.
    I, of course, am glad to see this level of effort put into an unlabelled state on the map.
     
  15. tehskyman Engineer for the money

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    Birmingham would probably be a hammer and pick. And maybe an anvil.

    This is the flag of Montgomery without the laurel. I'll probably change the hammer and sickle to a cross or something. But yea, the sickle and hammer does a great job of representing the peasant. Which is probably why the Soviets chose it.
     
  16. HonestAbe1809 Abraham Lincoln 2020

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    Dec 1, 2013
    The current totemic symbol feels like two totemic symbols co-mingling. Having it be the hammer and sickle/pick alone would be simpler.

    Exactly. If it doesn’t work in Montgomery the hammer and sickle could work elsewhere. Some peasant’s republic in Appalachia could use it. The nearly thousand years would mean that it’s been divorced from any negativity regarding communism.
     
  17. tehskyman Engineer for the money

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    Which variant?
    mFlagVariant1.png mFlagVariant2.png mFlagVariant3.png mFlagVariant4.png
     
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  18. HonestAbe1809 Abraham Lincoln 2020

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  19. HonestAbe1809 Abraham Lincoln 2020

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    Dec 1, 2013
    I definitely like that new flag best. The stars keep the middle stripe from feeling too empty and the flipped halberds make the flag feel more balanced than having them both point up.

    I was just thinking that smaller states could have more Marxist-leaning ideologies because they don’t have the power bases of countries like Ohio or Mississippi. They’re also in much more precarious situation than those countries. So the leaders might have more reason to be concerned of the issues the peasants deal with. This “Medieval Marxism” could be in places that were more left-leaning in pre-regression days.
     
  20. tehskyman Engineer for the money

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    Montgomery County has this "Medieval Marxism" thing going on because it can't be interfered with. Neither Mississippi nor Georgia will allow the other to control the city and so they both let it do it's own sort of thing. The city was also founded on the basis of a peasant rebellion, a peasant rebellion started by merchants and mercenaries which would not have been successful without those mercs.

    Even the smallest medieval state is going to be able to handle a peasant rebellion. High Quality steel armor and swords and horses will allow even a handful of knights (read killers properly fed and trained from birth to kill) to basically solo-kill tens if not a hundred peasants who at best might have some leather armor and a converted sickle.

    Montgomery is probably better thought of as a more libertarian place, dominated by merchants and corporations rather than feudal knights.
     
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