Medieval America Mark III

Can you cite an example of that title actually being used in the South?
Outside of general military use in both the US Navy and, when it existed, the Confederate Navy, it is commonly used to refer to the presidents of yacht clubs (giving it an aristocratic bent, for the aristocratic nature of the office), and was a nickname of Cornelius Vanderbilt and is used as the name of sports teams in his namesake university.
 
Outside of general military use in both the US Navy and, when it existed, the Confederate Navy, it is commonly used to refer to the presidents of yacht clubs (giving it an aristocratic bent, for the aristocratic nature of the office), and was a nickname of Cornelius Vanderbilt and is used as the name of sports teams in his namesake university.
I don't see yacht clubs making a big impression on non-maritime mississippi, and Vanderbilt is in Tennessee.
 
You could just scrap it and replace it with Colonel or Mayor.
My instinct would be to make Colonel the replacement, but I don't see Mayor - its modern American connotation being the "ruler" of a city - fitting in a nation which explicitly has next to no cities. Alternatively, I could make Mayor the title of the not-Shogun, but given it's ubiquity in American parlance I thought it wouldn't seem high-ranking enough to be effectively the ruler of the Commonwealth. My third thought was Viceroy, which is perhaps the most accurate to describe what the position does (a sub-regal role), but doesn't have much history of usage in the South. Other options might be Wizard/Grand Wizard/Imperial Wizard, depending on the level of influence the KKK might have.
 
My instinct would be to make Colonel the replacement, but I don't see Mayor - its modern American connotation being the "ruler" of a city - fitting in a nation which explicitly has next to no cities. Alternatively, I could make Mayor the title of the not-Shogun, but given it's ubiquity in American parlance I thought it wouldn't seem high-ranking enough to be effectively the ruler of the Commonwealth. My third thought was Viceroy, which is perhaps the most accurate to describe what the position does (a sub-regal role), but doesn't have much history of usage in the South. Other options might be Wizard/Grand Wizard/Imperial Wizard, depending on the level of influence the KKK might have.
Lieutenant Governor?
 
State of Louisiana
State of Louisiana


  • System of Government: Secratarial State
    • Head of State: Governor, the husband of the Witch-Queen
    • Head of Government: Witch-Queen, chosen by matrilinear descent from the ruling Long family
  • Population: 1,640,000
  • Religion: Voodoo, with tolerance of all faiths
  • Totemic Symbol: Pelican
It’s hard to remember a time when Louisiana was anything other then the regional hegemon. If anything, things have improved for Louisiana in the new Medieval era. The time when N’awleens was a hurricane-ravaged backwater are long forgotten; with anti-flooding measures built to last and construction methods that are more mindful of the Caribbean environment it stands as the largest city in North America, and perhaps even the world. For most American merchants it is the final stop on their voyage before handing their cargo off to Louisianian pilots who navigate the treacherous pirate infested bayous.

A thousand years ago the ongoing collapse of civilization prompted many to turn to religion for answers. In the West this meant the rise of Scientology, the New Age and American Buddhism. On the Great Plains a return to Old Testament values. Across much of the east people found solace in the new state sanctioned non-denominational church, the only ones that were able to stay open in the tumultuous financial situation that accompanied the collapse of the industrial world. On the Gulf of Mexico however people began turning towards voodoo, its polytheistic nature accounting for their chaotic lives. As the movement grew, many Christian leaders launched campaigns of persecution in an attempt to root it out.

The Governor of Louisiana would launch one such pogrom against southeastern Louisiana, the largest center of Voodoo in the formerly contiguous states. The local leader of the Voodoo community in New Orleans, the so-called “Witch-Queen”, organized the resistance against this pogrom. After several victories the Witch-Queen organized a congress consisting of prominent members of the Voodoo community and Christian politicians who opposed the Governor. The congress ruled that the Governor had violated the Louisianan constitution’s provision for freedom of religion and thus rendered his governorship null and void. The Congress elected the Witch-Queen as the state’s new governor, now with a provisional capital in New Orleans.

Louisiana has had to fight hard for its recognition over the years, and for the recognition of voodoo as a legitimate faith. It has taken on a self-appointed role as the protector of religious liberty in the Gulf. Persecutions by the surrounding states have historically prompted reprisals from the Louisianans, which have resulted in the State seizing control over some extremely wealthy exclaves that have solidified its position as regional thalassocrat. It was during such religious conflicts that Louisiana took control of Mobile and Tampa.

Louisiana's strength does not lie in its armies. Its army is small, lacking much on the way of heavy cavalry or a strong professional class. Most troops are armed with machetes or pikes. Louisiana has been able to assure its independence and even become powerful through its massive navy. Thousands of merchant and military ships fly under the Louisianian flag: at a moment’s notice they can shift their operations towards conquest, raiding and razing shorelines while offloading thousands of sailors-turned-shock-troops. Most importantly of all however is its control over the Mississippi and American trade: if it wishes, it can cut off any state in the east from vital trade.

Today the Witch-Queen in N’awleens holds court in her palace while her husband launches a punitive campaign against the burghers of Cuba. Her ascendancy seems assured: it would take a hurricane the size of the Great Plains to dislodge Louisiania from its pedestal.
 
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The Red River Territory
The Red River Territory
Red-River-Territory.jpg


System of Government:
Sovereign Monastic State
Head of State: Imperial Wizard of the Red River Territory, appointed by predecessors and confirmed by their high council
Population: 2,488,750
Religion: American Non-Denominational Church
Totemic Symbol: Alligator

Among the westernmost reaches of eastern civilization, the Red River Territory is a Crusader State, forged in battle against the New Israelite Cowboys of the Plains and maintained by a fearsome array of lancers, horse archers, and macheteros. It is also, however, a land sitting at a crossroads, between the Secretarial States of the Caribbean, the Feudal States of the East, and the Nomadic States of the Plains, and has drawn upon elements of all three in its development. On maps in the east, it and Iowa share the dubious honor of being the final states fully inked before the lands of heathens and barbarians, and the strange countries beyond.

The Red River Territory has it’s roots in the Southern Crusades, a series of wars between the American Non-Denominational Church and the various cowboy lords of the region. For generations, the cowboys had ruled over what was known as Cajunland. The pre-Crusade Cajuns had originated closer to the coast, but as the caribbean, voodoo-worshipping population grew along the coast, many Cajuns migrated inland, forming communities around Natchez, Monroe, Alexandria, and the greatest of them all, Shreveport. Religion was mixed in Cajunland, with some practicing a form of Non-Denominationalism, while others practiced a deeply altered form of Catholicism. Some one hundred and fifty years ago, the region was ruled by the Plauchet Family, a tributary offshoot of the Andersons to the west.

This all changed with the declaration of the Non-Denominational Crusade for Shreveport. This event was spurred on by two factors. The first was the arraying of an unprecedented alliance of Southern District Supervisors in the Supreme Court, who managed to break the Northeast’s traditional hold on evangelical power, and who had greater interest in the expansion of the church in the south. This was coupled with the rise of the Sons of the South, a military order seeking to curb the excessive honor killings occurring amongst southern nobles by directing their energies outwards. The Crusade was declared, and a host joined battle under the banner of the Sons of the South, composed largely of Mississippians, Georgians, Tennesseans, and Carolinians. The lancers of the Crusade overran the Plauchet defenses, and with some Cajun support for their co-religionists, captured Shreveport. The massacre within was brutal, with crusaders killing Israelite, Non-Denom, and Voodoo without discrimination. When it was done, the back of the Plauchets was broken, and the collected lords bestowed upon the Imperial Wizard of the Sons of the South a crown and a banner, depicting the totemic symbol they had selected; the alligator.

The Red River Territory is blessed with natural borders: the Pine Belt to the west, the Mississippi River to the east, the Ouachita Mountains to the north, and the Gulf to the south. However, all of these borders have proven to be more porous than one might hope, and raids from all four directions are common. As a result, the nobility of the Red River Territory is highly militarized. The nobles of the Territory have never forgotten their origins as the Sons of the South, and thus many still wear the blue X pins which denoted membership in that organization, and drill in the most well-organized army in Dixie. Nevertheless, an army composed solely of lancers has proved insufficient, and as such the nobles of the territory have adapted. Some fight as horse archers; most as the Mississippi-style lamellar archers, but many as cowboy-style light horse archers as well. Others arm their peasant levies as pikemen in the style of Louisiana, creating pike formations which can ward off attacks by light cavalry.

Though it was once known as “Cajunland,” the Red River Territory is not uniformly Cajun in character. Cajuns tend to be concentrated in the cities and in the swampy south-east, while the rest of the territory is divided between Texans and Arkansans, who have much more cowboy influence than southern. Of course, the rule by the Sons of the South has imparted much of a Southern aristocratic culture, and the plantations of the Red River Territory do resemble those further east to a large degree. But there are also nomadic clans loyal to Shreveport who guard the Pine Belt, free villages who populate the foothills of the Ozarks, and of course, the burghers and merchants of the major cities of the Red River Territory.

Shreveport is certainly no N’awlins or Houston, but it is nevertheless an important center of trade and commerce unlike anything in the southeast save Augusta. Shreveport serves as the gateway to the southern portion of the Prairie, with a grand caravansary welcoming distant caravans from inner Texas and Oklahoma. Locally-produced goods are also loaded onto either caravans or ships from Shreveport, most notably leatherwork and sugarcane; the former goes south and east, to the Caribbean or Feudal Core, while the latter goes west, with sugar and other foodstuffs, to the wealthy amongst the plains. Alexandria and Monroe see the same things play out on smaller scales; they are wealthy and prosperous towns, but consistently overshadowed by Shreveport.

Leadership-wise, the Sons of the South and the Red River Territory have become one and the same, even if some successor organizations remain scattered across Dixie. The Territory, and organization, is led by the Imperial Wizard and his deputy, the High Dragon. High Dragons are selected by the reigning Imperial Wizard and confirmed by his council of deputies; they are then confirmed again upon the Wizard’s death, before taking up the scepter of the Imperial Wizard. The lines of crusaders still claim membership in the order and rule vast swathes of territory, though increasingly there has been intermarriage between the ruling class and the Cajuns or Texans they rule. Of course, the nature of the several cultures ruled by the Territory means that not everywhere is ruled by installed southern landlords; in the west, Non-Denominational nomadic clans of horsemen patrol the Pine Belt, and their chiefs pay tribute to Shreveport. In the north, among the mountain foothills, live tough villages of Arkansans whose village elders serve a similar role.

The process of ruling this territory has led to cultural elements blending together. The Red River aristocracy has taken to speaking Cajun, and their cuisine has adopted such Cajun elements as alligator meat, blends of carrots, celery, onions, and green peppers, and rice, as opposed to the black beans, pork, corn, and tomatoes that characterize traditional southern cuisine. Beef, too, has been brought in through the cattle herds managed by the cowboys and those descended from them. Alcohol, too, is far less common in Red River than it is elsewhere in the south, owing to a lingering sense of the New Israelites' ban on alcohol - after all, there's no harm in picking up an extra abstention from a vice, right? The presence of cities and towns has also led to peasants generally being freer in the Red River Territory than elsewhere in the south, with the freeman pike organizations being a direct result of this change.

While Cajun and Texan cultural practices have been tolerated, and in some cases even adopted, such as with Cajun cuisine and the Cajun language, the Red River Territory has remained staunchly Non-Denominational. The Cajun population, having already practiced a form of Non-Denominationalism, was easily incorporated into this new structure, but the New Israelites to the west and the Voodoo practitioners to the south have both proved more troublesome. Purges and expulsions have led to trouble with both Louisiana and the Anderson Territory, but active conversion attempts continue. Interestingly, the Red River Territory does not have a District Supervisor, and is thus locked out of power with the Supreme Court. Despite repeated attempts by the Red River Territory, no Supreme Court has broken with tradition and created a new District Supervisor.

The Red River Territory today remains a curiosity among many members of the American Non-Denominational Church; this crusader kingdom follows no hereditary kingship, rules over a strange people seemingly with as much in common with the Caribbeans and Cowboys as with easterners, yet who worship their same faith, and who trade with the cowboys and as far away as the Mormons and New Agers. Cajun culture, blended with Southern culture and Texan culture through the Sons of the South and the Red River Territory, is emerging as a polyglot society on the edge of the Feudal Core.
 
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The Red River Territory
View attachment 426429

System of Government:
Sovereign Monastic State
Head of State: Imperial Wizard of the Red River Territory, appointed by predecessors and confirmed by their high council
Population: 1,855,000
Religion: American Non-Denominational Church
Totemic Symbol: Alligator
The population is bit low. Refer to this to help you. Mississippi's population might have to be lowered a bit too
 
  1. @Imperial Inkstand-filler is two-for-two on creating excellent write-ups for nations.
  2. We previously discussed renaming Red River Territory to Texarkana. What if they use a name derived an “Anglicized” version of “Cajun”. It’s both to further represent how they are America’s Prussians and for the irony of further corrupting “Acadia”.
 
Lost Vegas, Part I
Lost Vegas, Part I



Las Vegas was among the first cities to be lost to the New Middle Ages. Las Vegas was not a city built on some advantageous geography as most other cities in the US and indeed the world had been. Las Vegas was once a sleepy Nevada hamlet. Its rise to prominence came when workers on the new Hoover Dam went looking for somewhere to get a little T&A. Before you knew it the first casinos were opening in Las Vegas, organized crime was moving in, and Las Vegas gained its reputation as the home of sin and vice; a new Babylon.

But Las Vegas was predicated upon the economy of the industrial world, an economy that gave workers unprecedented amounts of free time, disposable income, and the ability to travel long distances on a whim. In the new middle ages a city like Las Vegas, far as it was from water or other civilizations, was quickly depopulated. Unlike most other cities which were depopulated slowly in a piecemeal manner, Las Vegas was depopulated all at once, seemingly overnight. The city was left untouched to be reclaimed by the desert.

Nevada degenerated into a series of pastoral clans, riding their camels and tending their herds of sheep. Mostly they were descended not from the citizens of Las Vegas, who had mostly decamped to the more urban regions of California and Arizona, but the rural people of Northern Nevada. They had few good memories of Vegas, a den of vice that had a long history of stealing their water for its own use. The hulking ruins of the city inspired fear among the tribes. They told tales of it’s ruins and the daemons said to haunt its broad avenues. The ruins became taboo, and the Nevadans avoided it at all costs.

It only made sense, then, that the worst possible punishment possible was to be condemned to the city. Those too terrible to tolerate but not bad enough to execute were exiled to Los Vegas, where they were expected to die not long afterwards. They were branded with a “V”, and expected to be killed on sight if they left the confines of the ruins - but within the ruins, they were not to be harmed. California had a long history of exiling their criminals to Nevada and when these convicts arrived the Nevadans treated them as they would their own. The practice even spread to the people of Bajo Colorado and Western Arizona.

The genesis of the Vegasite state came from two sources. Eight hundred years ago a rebellion in California prompted the exile of thousands of Californian rebels. When they arrived in Nevada they were treated as countless before them, branded by uncouth savages and driven to the dunes where now only a few remnants of the old city peaked out. At the same time, New Age refugees were driven from Phoenix by a lost war and forced to Vegas. These two forces represented the largest and most civilized group to ever arrive in the ruins, and they formulated a plan.

A series of hit-and-run raids subdued the local tribes, most importantly those that sat upon Lake Mead and the Hoover Dam. This secured both water and one of the most vital trade routes in the south west. In Vegas itself they began to drill wells. In the process, they came upon a realization: Las Vegas remained extraordinarily intact. Below their feet there was a fortune in glass and steel, just there for the taking.
 
There should be two groups of people after the Fall of Lost Vegas. Those who scattered to the seven winds and became the region’s answer to gypsies and the very small community clinging to life in the ruins of their former splendour.
 
Mississippi & Red River Population Count
The population is bit low. Refer to this to help you. Mississippi's population might have to be lowered a bit too
Alright, having combed through that map, here's my revised population numbers:

Mississippi
  • Light Green (150k) - 14 full, 5 partial (added) (2,850,000)
  • Yellow (75k) - 2 full, 1.5 partial (262,500)
  • Purple (25k) - 2 partial (50,000)
Total: 3,162,500

Red River
  • Light Green (150k) - 12 full, 1.75 partial (2,062,500)
  • Yellow (75k) - 1 full, 1 partial (150,000)
  • Red (27.5k) - .5 partial (13,750)
  • Purple (25k) - 7 full, 3.5 partial (262,500)
Total: 2,488,750


  1. @Imperial Inkstand-filler is two-for-two on creating excellent write-ups for nations.
  2. We previously discussed renaming Red River Territory to Texarkana. What if they use a name derived an “Anglicized” version of “Cajun”. It’s both to further represent how they are America’s Prussians and for the irony of further corrupting “Acadia”.
Thank you! I personally like the name "Red River Territory," but I'm not opposed to an anglicized Cajun term for it.
 
The Red River Territory is a territory until the Supreme Court decides to admit it to the Union.
That's a very interesting way of looking at it, but by that logic shouldn't the Anderson territory be seeking admission? And aren't Rizzini's ruling over a territory?
 
Speaking of Royal titles, has there been any reason given for the titles of “Commonwealth” vs “State” and “County” in the east? I assume State and Commonwealth are reserved for former states, but is the implication that Commonwealth refers to nations which cover more than one former state (in the same way that “Empire” traditionally refers to a state which encompasses nation/kingdom)? That would cover Mississippi (Mississippi and Alabama) and Ohio (Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, etc) for sure, but Georgia and Michigan only sort of fit that description (Michigan’s holdings in Ontario, Georgia seems to have a bit of northern Florida), but it might suggest that these nations were once more expansive than they are currently - I could see a Georgian Commonwealth once encompassing the Carolina lowlands, but I’m not sure where else Michigan might have held.

Edit: Perhaps the convention for naming states in the American Non-Denomination Church could follow:
  • County - the most basic order of independent states, Counties are still recognized as having a right to self-governance by the Supreme Court and admitted into the union. The majority of the time, counties do not control an antediluvian state capital, which is why they are not granted the title of state, though in a few rare instances, they do.
  • State - descended from the states of the pre-event United States, states are limited to those with claims on pre-regression titles (not unlike the title Emperor being reserved for those with claims on the Roman Empire in the Middle Ages) and always control the District Supervisor's seat of that state (why Allegheny County is not granted the title of State despite being larger and more populous than the states of Virginia and West Virginia).
  • Territory - only coming into play in the west, Territories refer to areas taken from the cowboys (in Red River's case) or taken by cowboys who converted (in Iowa's case) - both times, taking a title previously used by the cowboys. For reference, cowboys adopted the title of territories from old America, seeing their use in pre-admittance states and assuming territories, being larger, were "greater empires" than the states.
  • Commonwealth - the largest and grandest title, Commonwealths have claims on more than one State government, and maintain those claims to the modern day. For some, those claims are de facto, such as Ohio and Mississippi, while for others, Michigan and Georgia, they are relics of past territory (open to suggestions on what those claims are).
 
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Speaking of Royal titles, has there been any reason given for the titles of “Commonwealth” vs “State” and “County” in the east? I assume State and Commonwealth are reserved for former states, but is the implication that Commonwealth refers to nations which cover more than one former state (in the same way that “Empire” traditionally refers to a state which encompasses nation/kingdom)? That would cover Mississippi (Mississippi and Alabama) and Ohio (Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, etc) for sure, but Georgia and Michigan only sort of fit that description (Michigan’s holdings in Ontario, Georgia seems to have a bit of northern Florida), but it might suggest that these nations were once more expansive than they are currently - I could see a Georgian Commonwealth once encompassing the Carolina lowlands, but I’m not sure where else Michigan might have held.
Well, Michigan encompasses part of Ontario which is now considered a state, but the real answer is that Commonwealth now means "Empire".
 
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