Medieval America Mark III

Victoria Island and the Fractured Coast
Victoria Island and the Fractured Coast

From Ketchikan to Cambell River at the tip of the Strait of Georgia lies a labyrinthine coast. Bisected by mountains and fjords this land is a confusing mess. Ever since it was nearly purged of people by Adam Holt and his vast warband 600 years ago this land has been a blank slate for people to impose their will upon it. And impose they have. Groups from surrounding lands have settled here and prospered off of the lush rainforest and bountiful sea. Native Americans from over the mountains, Laskans from the North and Cascadians from the South come together, to produce a wonderfully chaotic mess of a country. The rainy climate leads to dense forests harvested for their timber as well as fields which feed countless villages and towns. The rich waters also enable the land to carry a greater population than otherwise would be possible.

Victoria Island

Once upon a time this Island was named Vancouver, so was a city, in fact so were two cities, neither of which were on this island. For the people of the new medieval Age this became confusing. If the main city on this island is called Victoria, a city state named Vancouver is across the sea and a town named Vancouver is several hundred kilometers away and is just a suburb of Portland, why are we calling this island Vancouver? It definitely makes more sense to call it Victoria Island and so it was.

Victoria Island has many valleys and a warm climate as well as deep long harbors stretching into the interior. These harbors are home to various Cascadian colonies turned semi-independent town states. Alberni, Cold Harbor, Nanaimo, Campbell River and Cowichan all crowd onto the island. Occasionally these towns will send troops to interfere with the squabbles of the city states. Sometimes they can get lucky and get some concessions/influence from the larger city states. Usually though the towns are under the thumb of other city states. Because of the long infuence of the Cascadian merchants and the relatively close proximity, most people are Buddhist. The island used to be more religiously diverse. But they weren't expecting the Holy Orders.

The Fractured Coast

The coast of British Columbia was cut by many deep and long fjords and countless smaller ones. Most of the major ones will have a colony or two at their head especially if the valleys beyond the fjord cut through the mountains to the interior. These colonies allow Cascadian merchants to trade with interior tribes, providing metal and various luxuries in exchange for minerals and furs. Bella Coola, Arrandale and Osland are islands of Cascadia in a sea of barbarism.

Outside of the colonies, hundreds of small villages live off the land and sea. South of the Johnstone Strait is much more Cascadian in nature, meaning that pretty much everyone is a Bhuddist. But north of the strait, all the way to Ketchikan is a mess of Laskan Orthodoxy, Cascadian Buddhism and Interior Paganism. These villages are in competition for land and piety. These tensions mean that petty wars and micro genocides happen every year. However as the influence of the Cascadians grow here and in the Alzandar Islands, more and more are converting to Bhuddism. Soon Cascadia will begin at Yakutat bay.
 
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The Devil’s Flock
The Devil’s Flock



When men from the east arrived on the shores of America, they brought four legged beasts that could carry a man on it’s back. They brought faceless snakes that burrowed in the dirt and made the soil rich. The people who had lived on these lands for hundreds of years were met with a barrage of unusual beasts. A citizen of the Mayan empire could not purchase a goat for a few coins and the plains people had to rely on their legs to catch their food. However, man became careless and brought alien creatures to these virgin lands. Fish with mouths like a viper, serpents that could swallow a man whole, and plants that clogged the waterways. But the most horrifying beast had a brown shaggy coat and no arms.

There are many tales about how the devil’s flock came to be. Some say that they were man-made abominations after a Heretic wizard attempted to reshape the body of a roadrunner. Others say that the old republic imported a million of them from a desert island off the coast of California. The more religious men and women of America state that God felt that the regression was not enough so he sent a walking plague on earth. While their origin shall remain a mystery to them, we all know that they are a threat to farmers, cities, and kingdoms alike.

However, the devil’s flock are not comprised of demons, warriors, ghouls, or monsters from another dimension. In reality, they are simply animals that were born on this world, were raised on this world, and will die on this world. From a long distance, an individual flock member will resemble a tall and dark man. Their appearance was probably the origin of the western skinwalkers which are giant hairy men that live in the desert. Up close, you can clearly see that they are birds giving them the name of the Devil’s Flock.

Unlike the falcon or hawk, these birds possess very very small wings due the the size of their bodies. Much like their physique, their talons are quite large and are a dangerous weapon when combined with their powerful kicks. Their long and flexible necks also allow them to reach the highest branches and feast upon the smallest of grasses. This allows the birds to grow about 5 feet in height, taller than many of the peasants today. Despite their shaggy coats, they thrive in the American deserts and do not mind bathing in shallow ponds. While one of these birds may be a nuisance, fifty of them are considered to be a menace to society.

For years, these strange beasts have lived happily in the wild west. The New Agers would often associate these creatures with famine, drought, and disease. This superstition was mainly due to the fact that these birds were opportunists and an opportunist will eat what it can get. The farms of New Mexico have been raided by these shaggy bipedal monsters for many years. Not even the pharaohs of California were safe from this mysterious creature. Governor Thomas Cruise the Eight famously tried domesticating these birds to fight against the Nevadan savages. All attempts ended with the emus breaking out of the ranches and attacking the innocent farmers.

During the olden times, the emus were mainly restricted to the dry deserts of lands far away. Travelers said that they would often raid farms consisting of corn, wheat, barley, and sunflowers. In order to show off to their mates, they would jump up and down while swinging their heads back and forth. The locals would often refer to these beaked oddities as emus. Little did they know, the descendants of the travelers would see enough of them to last a lifetime. As the droughts of 400 struck our great continent, the emu population began to dwindle. In an attempt to find new food, thousands of them fled east to the farmlands.

They ravaged the gardens and villages leaving behind wounded farmers. The kings and kingdoms were not very pleased about this so they began to look for a solution. About two hundred and fifty years ago, Governor Lucas Bartholomew Johnson of Arkansas declared war against these beasts and tried to push them into the deserts where they came from. About two hundred and fifty years later, the devil’s flock has only become more bloodthirsty.

If you were to offer a small dog to an emu from the west, they would merely ignore it it. However, if you were to offer it to an easterner, they would smash the blood and bowels out of the poor canine while mercilessly pecking at it’s face. Observers have compared these new emus to the bandit clans as they are always lead by a stronger individual with a bit of black plumage on his head. It appears that mankind’s savage nature has imprinted itself onto the emus. Over two centuries of war have hardwired their minds to exterminate all threats to the flock. As the kingdoms of the east attempt to exterminate this foul pest, one must ask himself. What is mankind but merely another part of the food chain?
 
No, I think he meant House's name as a reference to Fallout: New Vegas. He was that guy who stuffed his brain in a computer, right?
And the name Randall is a reference to Randall Flagg from Stephen King's The Stand. Both Flag and House had control over states in Vegas in their respective stories. It could be that instead Robert House is the founder of the dynasty and Randall is the distant descendent who kept the shattered remnants of the city together after the Fall of Vegas. How distant is he? Randall is the bastard child of Robert House's great-grandchild eleven times removed. The period following the Fall of Vegas was a period of recovery and while it couldn't recover its former glory it's been able to claw back a reasonably good standard of living in about three centuries. Still a pale shadow of its former glory but not the hellhole that it was shortly after the Fall.
 
(Non-Canon) Artifacts
Artifacts


Glassware

In medieval America, glassblowing was one of the few pre-Regression arts to not be lost in the following centuries. Glass objects could serve a practical function as well as have any aesthetic appeal. Though even the crudely-made glass items made in the post-Regression world can only be afforded by the upper crust, as the peasants had to make do with pottery or copper drinking glasses. The highest members of society prize specimens of pre-Regression glassware for their personal use. The few intact specimens of pre-Regression drink bottles are often used as the noble's prized drinking glasses, especially those with the pre-Regression labels still in legible condition. Even, broken pre-regression glass is often used in the construction of the windows of high ranking officials' houses. Pre-Regression glassware is extremely expensive and rare considering how much of it was destroyed in the Regression and the centuries following it.

Electronics

Examples of the lost Pre-Regression art form of "elektronics" are highly prized by the powerful in societies all across the continent. Items such as strange handheld devices that are said to have gifted pre-Regression people with the ability to speak people across the continent, strange boxes that gifted pre-Regression people with the ability to see shows as if they were there in the flesh, wondrous computing machines that were said to gift the pre-Regression user with access to a library with an unfathomable amount of information, and strange goggles that are said to immerse the pre-Regression user in an incredibly lifelike illusion for the purpose of some form of recreation. These astounding artifacts, though non-functional, are still prized possessions of the nobles who own them, as many hold on to the hope that the magic that made them operate them would return and bestow the blessings of the artifact upon them.

Firearms

Virtually nobody in the post-Regression world knows how to produce gunpowder for weapons. The examples of Pre-Regression handheld firearms are only a curiosity at most in virtually every Post-Regression state. A bayoneted rifle is, after all, nothing more than a short spear in the Post-Regression world. Ironically the vintage rifles used by Pre-Regression historical reenactment groups are more effective in this task than their more modern counterparts. At least one Post-Regression leader as had a Pre-Regression rifle melted down and reforged as a sword in a misguided attempt to imbue its deadly abilities into the blade.

PS: Just me wondering how the medieval Americans would perceive Pre-Regression artifacts.
 
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Excellent job but I still have one question. The one I want to ask is whether or not we'll be adding guns or hand-cannons. The first hand cannons were made during the high middle ages in China. While it was a very heavy and very metal item, I can still imagine the United States sending ships filled with men carrying hand cannons. Do any of you think that this could be plausible?
 
So based on the history of gunpowder in the medieval world, either everyone has it and knows about it, or almost noone does.

The muslims (of the old world) were first using gunpowder in about 1240-1280. So from there it only took about 50 to 60 years for gunpowder to spread into Europe. Its a fairly simple creation. Once you know the main ingredients then you can mess around with the percentages to achieve the desired effect. In fact, by the 1320s guns were spreading across Europe rapidly. Word gets around and if the USA knows about gunpowder then so does pretty much every other country.

I don't think that anyone should have gunpowder because it would mean pretty much everyone else has gunpowder and then we're doing a Rennaisance America. If the muslim states have gunpowder, then their neighbors will have encountered gunpowder in the field and now want this weapon. This'll be relatively easy. The muslim states are relatively small. They have a combined population of 100-200,000 people at most. Furthermore, they are divided. All it takes for gunpowder to spread to New Mexico or Utah or even to the cowboys, is one captured/defected alchemist.

The reason why the muslim states are independent (if they actually are) is because of their defensible terrain. They can use the narrow passes and the high ground as force multipliers to defeat intruders from Deseret, New Mexico or the plains. They do not necessarily have to be more technologically advanced inorder for them to be independent. That said, I don't think that they would be independent. They would probably be divided into vassal marcher states for either Deseret or New Mexico. It's simply too hard for such small states to remain independent from these two empires.

In conclusion, if the Muslim states have gunpowder, so do their neighbors. If America has gunpowder, then everyone else they are in contact with does too.
 
The Wheeled Warriors of the Wastes
The Wheeled Warriors of the Wastes



The cold spell was a curse for many. It killed crops, wiped out animals, and killed thousands of men and women. However, it was a blessing for many others. As rain came back to the deserts of the west, forests grew and villages thrived. However, areas like the Chihuahuan Desert only received a slight increase in rainfall. While the forests around them began to grow, many of the nomads were unaware about the droughts and harvests that happened around them. However, they began to use the expanding forests to good use and created strange wooden machines.

Tales of the early collapse were mostly about men riding metal machines through the barren wasteland. However, metal turns to rust and the fuel for these metal machines became harder to find. So mankind turned to the beasts of the world for guidance. But just like man and his machines, the creatures that man tamed had their limits. They required more food and water than your Uncle Joe and would die in the extreme cold or heat. This was the case for the the Chihuahuan desert who had lands so barren, not even the horse arches would think about raiding it. With no horse and no cattle, the Chihuahuas picked up their tools and created something new.

The people would take long walks up the ‘sky islands’ which had large and bountiful forests on their peaks. The trees that grew upon these mountains held the leaves and wood that created their homes. Yet wood was not the deserts only gift for you will spot prickly pears and mormon tea in these drylands. However, the mountain's resources did not last forever and forcing people to once again, roam the lowlands. It was clear that the people of Chihuahua would need a new form of transport that would not only minimize exhaustion, but also allow them to deliver loads that a man could not carry on his own. The vehicle was an odd wooden structure that was known as the kickbike or the ruedaleta.

As you know, metal is much too expensive for something so frivolous in the middle ages especially for a nomad. That is why all kickbikes are created from the wood harvested from the mountain trees. Many could also argue that a wooden chain is far too fragile for something that is used so frequently. That is why the kickbikes are not pedal-powered but powered by one kicking the ground of with his or her foot. The closest thing we have to a kickbike is a large knee scooter with a cart attached to the front. By balancing your body, you can waste much less energy than running especially in the hot summers.

The people of Chihuahua mostly used this as a vehicle that could carry around light loads. The kickbikes were also much faster than your brother Jimmy carrying around a cart all day. These were very useful for the nomads that lived in places where the horse and the camel was rare. It was also much easier to chase down your prey if you didn’t carry all of your weapons on your back. The stray cattle population was hardly affected by the mexican wolves and the increased rainfall only allowed its numbers to grow. This was good news for the desert men that found a new way to bring the hides, meat, and bones back to base camp.

As the years passed, the kickbike found another place in Chihuahuan society, warfare. When the warrior cultures declared war upon each other, the kickbike was used to send messages from camp to camp. No longer would a messenger suffer the fate of Pheidippides by dying only minutes after completing his or her mission. However, they also sent scouts that could travel long distances and spy on enemy tribes and report back to the elders. Smoke messengers could send signals from far away to alert the tribe whether or not they found food.

Mobile infantry now existed thanks to these vehicles and these military kickbikes were usually ridden by two people. The person in the back would usually be the one to power and steer the vehicle while the person in the front would shoot arrows or throw knives at their unsuspecting victims. Several modifications have been made to this machine such as adding daggers, shields, or spikes in order to wound your enemies. While some horses did roam the southern deserts, it was the ruedaleta that allowed the nomads to prosper.
 
The original plan was to flesh out the Pacific Northwest and Laska before moving on to the Great Plains. If you were to write something about the Great Plains that'd be appreciated.
Hold on there, cowboy. A few posts still NEED to be done on Cascadia before we move on to the Plains.

Part of the goal of this project is to also fill in all of the pages we know for a fact that White intended to fill out, but never did. The only one left that HAS to be done is the "Here There Be Monsters" for the Sasquatch.
 
Hold on there, cowboy. A few posts still NEED to be done on Cascadia before we move on to the Plains.

Part of the goal of this project is to also fill in all of the pages we know for a fact that White intended to fill out, but never did. The only one left that HAS to be done is the "Here There Be Monsters" for the Sasquatch.
I stand corrected. I'm just eager to progress to the Islamic countries and the rest of the Great Plains. Not to mention the whole "fallen Hydrological Empire" idea with Vegas. What other posts need to be done with Cascadia other than the "Here There Be Monsters" page?
 
I stand corrected. I'm just eager to progress to the Islamic countries and the rest of the Great Plains. What other posts need to be done with Cascadia other than the "Here There Be Monsters" page?
Nothing else *needs* to be done. Personally, it'd be nice to see Laska finished (I've even got a map in the works), a blurb on Eskimoland, a HTBM on the Pacific Giant Octopus (totemic symbol of the Admiral), I've got a post idea on Boeing and Amazon in the Pac-NW... no other ideas for me.

But again, Sasquatch is the only thing that needs to be done before I'll open up the Great Plains.
 
Nothing else *needs* to be done. Personally, it'd be nice to see Laska finished (I've even got a map in the works), a blurb on Eskimoland, a HTBM on the Pacific Giant Octopus (totemic symbol of the Admiral), I've got a post idea on Boeing and Amazon in the Pac-NW... no other ideas for me.

But again, Sasquatch is the only thing that needs to be done before I'll open up the Great Plains.
All right, you have a point. There's still more that can be written about Laska. I was too hasty.
  1. Does that include posts on the other three warlords?
  2. Eskimoland does seem like it'd be interesting to write about. I'd like to know about the perfectly preserved remains of the Pre-Regression settlements in the area.
  3. That does seem like it'd inspire monster stories.
  4. How does a aircraft manufacturer continue long after Air travel is a thing of the past? I presume Amazon would be a Pony Express-style mounted delivery service.
Once again I'm open to discussing these ideas further.
 
All right, you have a point. There's still more that can be written about Laska. I was too hasty.
  1. Does that include posts on the other three warlords?
  2. Eskimoland does seem like it'd be interesting to write about. I'd like to know about the perfectly preserved remains of the Pre-Regression settlements in the area.
  3. That does seem like it'd inspire monster stories.
  4. How does a aircraft manufacturer continue long after Air travel is a thing of the past? I presume Amazon would be a Pony Express-style mounted delivery service.
Once again I'm open to discussing these ideas further.
1. Yes.
2. Yup.
3. Yup.
4. Moves into other areas of manufacturing. And yup.
 
Nothing else *needs* to be done. Personally, it'd be nice to see Laska finished (I've even got a map in the works), a blurb on Eskimoland, a HTBM on the Pacific Giant Octopus (totemic symbol of the Admiral), I've got a post idea on Boeing and Amazon in the Pac-NW... no other ideas for me.

But again, Sasquatch is the only thing that needs to be done before I'll open up the Great Plains.
With regards to Amazon, what do you have planned? I'm curious because I would be open to going back and re conning the House of Gates-Bezos if that conflicts with what you have in mind.
 
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